University of Rijeka

EVENINGS AT THE MOISE: “Glagolitic in the Cres-Lošinj archipelago”

On Thursday, June 3rd, professor dr. sc. Sanja Zubčić from the Department of Croatian Studies, Faculty of Philosophy, University of Rijeka gave a lecture “Glagolitic in the Cres-Lošinj archipelago” at the Moise palace.

After the lecture, a discussion developed and the local community from Cres presented some data and stories that were not known to researchers so far, and once again it was shown that the local community preserves many hidden knowledge that can help in research.

The lecture is available for watching at Moise Palace Facebook page: facebook.com/moisepalace/

 

Program of the “Equality and Citizenship 2021” Summer School

Summer School Equality and Citizenship

Summer school program and full schedule is available at the following link: Equality and Citizenship 2021

The Center for Advanced Studies Southeast Europe, the University of Rijeka, the University’s Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, and its Department of Philosophy are organizing the seventh edition of their Summer School on Equality and Citizenship.

This Summer School does not reproduce the familiar educational format of a university course. Instead, it consists of several Author-Meets-Critics symposia dedicated to a prominent author’s publications and present research. Within the School’s model, the leading participants hold lectures on their latest work or recount a recently published book. After the academics partaking in the symposium have presented their papers responding to the principal authors’ research, the keynote speakers reply to their critiques and comments.

This year’s leading participants are:

Prof. Ingrid Robeyns, University of Utrecht

Dr. Collis Tahzib, University of Oxford

Dr. Ivan Cerovac, University of Rijeka

The Summer School pertains primarily to post-doctoral and doctoral researchers, who are invited to contribute to arguments by commenting and asking informed questions. Moreover, post-doctoral and doctoral students who have participated in the School’s previous editions are invited to propose presenting their articles at the symposia. Post-doctoral and doctoral students alone can obtain certificates of participation that describe their engagement at the Summer School.

This year’s Summer School will take place from July 12th to July 16th, 2021, via Zoom.

Information

Participation in the Summer School is free of charge. Active participants should provide their full name, affiliation, and their talk’s title by July 4th. They should also indicate in which Author-Meets-Critics symposium they wish to participate. It is possible to present a paper at more than one symposium. Passive participants can apply by providing their full name and affiliation by July 9th. Potential participants should send all applications by email to politicalphilosophy@cas.uniri.hr.

If you require any further details, please contact us at politicalphilosophy@cas.uniri.hr.

Updated information regarding the Summer School will soon be available at http://www.cas.uniri.hr/, on the Projects – Summer School Equality and Citizenship pages.

Summer School Directors

Elvio Baccarini, University of Rijeka

Snježana Prijić-Samaržija, University of Rijeka

Nebojša Zelič, University of Rijeka

Organization Board

Ivan Cerovac, University of Rijeka

Ana Gavran Miloš, University of Rijeka

Hana Samaržija, University of Zagreb

Viktor Ivanković, CEU Budapest

Kristina Lekić Barunćić, University of Rijeka

Andrea Mešanović, University of Rijeka

EVENINGS AT THE MOISE: “Late medieval woodcarving art heritage of the island of Cres”

On May 27th, 2021, at the Moise Palace doc. dr. sc. Barbara Spanjol-Pandelo (Department of Art History, Faculty of Philosophy, University of Rijeka) and dr. sc. Matko Matija Marušić (independent researcher), gave a lecture on “Late medieval woodcarving art heritage of the island of Cres”.

 
They gave an interesting review of wooden statues of saints, wooden choir seats, and other wooden works of art of our island. Thus, in the first part of the lecture, Matko Matija Marušić spoke about the late medieval wooden sculpture preserved on the island of Cres, while Barbara Spanjol-Pandelo presented the choir seats from the church of the Cres Franciscan monastery.
The lecture is available for watching at Moise Palace Facebook page: facebook.com/moisepalace/

EVENINGS AT THE MOISE: “Mathematical Circus”

On Saturday, May 15, 2021, at the Moise Palace, Associate Professor dr. sc. Vedrana Mikulić Crnković and Associate Professor dr. sc. Bojan Crnković held a workshop for children called “Mathematical Circus”.

Professors from the Department of Mathematics at the University of Rijeka designed the workshops and lectures as part of the Science Festival 2021 – Culture of Science.
Bojan Crnković and Vedrana Mikulić Crnković, mathematicians, designed and created several activities to describe the connections between mathematics and the elements of the circus show. In this workshop, children learned about the mathematics behind some circus elements.

 

Spring 2021 CAS SEE Fellowship recipients

The Center for Advanced Studies of Southeastern Europe (CAS SEE) is pleased to announce the 13th generation of fellows, recipients of the Spring 2021 CAS SEE Fellowship Awards at the University of Rijeka. The purpose of the CAS SEE Fellowship Programme is to further the research and creative work in the fields of the humanities and humanistic social sciences in the Balkans and to provide support for early-stage researchers. Inspired by the cooperation of previous generations of CAS SEE Fellows and their creation of long-term thematic synergies among researchers, the upcoming CAS SEE Fellowship will stimulate fellows to present their research in Rijeka and in the Moise Palace, new university premises in Cres, at the Cres Island. Alongside pursuing their independent research interests, fellows will attend regular CAS SEE regional conferences and seminars.

We congratulate the following CAS SEE Fellowship Awards, University of Rijeka recipients:

Valeria Graziano (Queen Mary University of London, UK)

Project – title: “Get Along Comrade – Tinkering as Care for Freedom”

Desara Dushi (University of Bologna, Italy and University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg)

Project – title: “The Impact of Judicial Reform and New Judicial Institutions in the Rule of Law and EU Integration in Albania”

Nikolina Židek (Complutense University of Madrid, Spain)

Project – title: “The Genie Out of the Bottle: Engagement of the Argentinean-Croat Diaspora in Homeland Politics (1990-today)”

Bojan Bilić (University College London, UK)

Project – title: “Unexpected Challenges to Trans Freedom: Transphobia in Serbian Leftist Activism”

Viktor Pál (University of Tampere, Finland)

Project – title: “Red Trash. The Concept of Waste in Communist Eastern Europe”

Miloš Ćipranić (Faculty of Philosophy, University of Belgrade, Serbia)

Project – title: “The Statutes of Eastern Adriatic Communes in Space”

Marko Luka Zubčić (University of Rijeka, Croatia)

Project – title: “Institutional Epistemology of Open Order”

Gabriele Giacomini (University Vita-Salute San Raffaele in Milan, Italy)

Project – title: “The Utopia of “Rousseauian Democracy” in the Digital Age: A Liberal Critique”

“Evenings at the Moise”: The Forgotten Cornel

The Moise Palace on Cres again hosted an interesting lecture dedicated to health and the knowledges forgotten, when it comes to preserving it. On Thursday, July 16th, 2020, the Moise audience found out about the cornel (Cornus mas L.), on a lecture entitled “Searching for the Super Fruit of our Parts: The Forgotten Cornel”. The project, funded by the “27 Neighbourhoods” program is conceived to present the “Neighbourhood Kampus” as a part of the “Rijeka 2020 European Capital of Culture” project; and those citizens who attended the lecture at the Palace, have been presented with the results of chemical analysis of the cornel gathered around Rijeka (including the cornel collected on Cres). The analysis of the “forgotten cornel” was conducted at the Department of Biotechnology, University of Rijeka, and the lecture was accompanied by a practical introduction to aromas.

 

The healthy properties of the cornel have been known since the dawn of time and thanks to the conducted chemical analysis, we are now familiar with the scientific basis of the general claims praising the many benefits of consuming cornel. The best ways of preparing cornel have also been presented, in order to maximally preserve its useful properties. This was an opportunity to compare the scientifically proven facts about cornel with the practical experiences of the citizens of Cres and other Moise visitors. The lecture was held by an expert on aromas, M.Sc.Land.Arch. Tomislav Pavlešić, who introduced the term “aroma” before taking the audience on a sensory exploration. Under his guidance, the audience tried a multitude of samples of various flavors after the lecture, which was held according to the Croatian epidemiological standards and proscriptions.

 

“Fridays at the Moise” – Dr. Juraj Sepčić

“Fridays at the Moise” gatherings have continued on June 19th, 2020, with a lecture entitled “About Health”, and held by prof. dr. sc. Juraj Sepčić. The lecture is a part of a weekly event organized by the Centre for Lifelong Learning and the University of Rijeka.

“Health Is Silence of the Body”

Dr. Sepčić is professor emeritus at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Rijeka. His long career in working with patients and continuously studying medical science(s), enabled dr. Sepčić to introduce to us the concept of “health” through many aspects and circumstances. He began by asking – What is “health” and what does it mean to be “healthy”? Is it just the absence of disease, or does “being healthy” mean more than that? Those who visited last Friday’s lecture had the opportunity to hear about various approaches to health, as well as about the importance of an individual and a holistic approach to each person when it comes to enhancing their health.

Next Friday, on June 26th, 2020, the Moise Palace will host Tanja Blašković, an art pedagogue whose lecture entitled “From Garbage to Art” will consider the use of plastic bags as a medium for creating works of art and fashion accessories.

Thanks to Walter Salković for the photo coverage of our last Friday event and we hope to see as many interested citizens next Friday at the Moise as well.

“Architectures of Vision” – Call for Papers

The Call for Papers for our 2020 conference, “Architectures of Vision,” is now open!

International Association for Visual Culture’s 6th biennial conference in cooperation with the Department of Cultural Studies, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Rijeka

University of Rijeka, Croatia / September 10 – 12, 2020 / Submissions due May 1, 2020

“[T]he important thing is neither what was said (a content), nor the saying itself (an act), but rather the transformation, and the invention of still unsuspected mechanisms that will allow us to multiply the transformations.” Michel de Certeau, The Practice of Everyday Life

Architecture etymologically belongs to the order of power. Stemming from Greek and Latin, it means “master builder”, derived from archon, chief. Historically, it is understood as building with the vision of the upward, the improved, that is to say an ideal of progress. For its 2020 conference, the International Association for Visual Culture proposes, however, a different formulation of architecture–one of layering, of consciously building from something rather than of scripted building that seeks to level or eliminate the past. What can it mean when we think of architecture as a horizontal network–even a strategy–of different, converging and simultaneous processes?

Our 2020 theme–The Architecture of Vision–unites this lateral, at times instinctive, at times impromptu idea of architecture with a central topic of visual culture–namely vision and visuality. Vision is a central topic of visual culture, a discipline that for a couple of decades now has been trying to (re)imagine the world around us by taking into account the interplay between logos and imago, order and imagination.

Key terms for topics:

  • palimpsestic knowledge
  • propaganda in visual culture (historical and contemporary)
  • origins of change
  • monuments and architecture interventions in public space
  • revolution and counter-revolution: from local case studies to global critical thought subject formation (online/virtual and offline/IRL)
  • building vision: from the visuality of the “subaltern” to surveillance vision
  • visuality in cultural studies and ethnography visual culture, power and control
  • local case studies from Southeast Europe to the Global South: problems and opportunities
  • the subject of decentralized vision: participatory culture, emancipation and the digital
  • archivization / archive as architecture

The topic of this year’s conference seeks to better understand the processes of vision that remake our world as a kind of architectural layering. We seek historical and contemporary topics that respond to these three different strands:

  • First, architecture can be appropriated for the uses of literally “building a vision”, or creating a vision. Here, we are thinking of both the “countervisual” that is imagined and then acted upon–that is to say, made material in an architecture that has both an order and flexibility, which may be applied, reapplied, and grow. We are also thinking of the populist practices of the alt-right and other movements that oppose social or climate justice, whose philosophy and action are built on the production of a worldview based on “alternative facts” and feeling. In other words, how do movements rely on vision as much as infrastructure, i.e. “master building”? In what ways does contemporary visual culture help enable these counter-revolutionary practices, and in what ways can it be used as a weapon of critical thought against them?
  • Therefore, we seek to inspect vision also on a temporal level: as clairvoyance, the process of seeing the future. What is the future of visual culture? How are we to deal with new concepts in the field of cultural studies (from climate crisis to migration or redefinitions of gender, citizenship, and subjectivity on a global scale, to local important struggles specific to a region)? How do we re-articulate those concepts within the frameworks of Visual Culture Studies, including its counter-hegemonic and anti-colonial approach?

Finally, we wish to inspect vision as one of the central themes of visual culture. Vision as a way of seeing, placing the one who looks in the forefront. How is a subject placed in the position of looking? Who is a subject? What is the position of looking today, in a world without a stable vantage point? Can we still insist on the notion of a subject, if the Renaissance position of the stable agent of the look and its object is no longer useful in the digital realm of intersubjective exchange, deep fakes, bots, and algorithms? In other words, how can we reimagine vision as a process of political and cultural emancipation as the world exists today?

We seek proposals for short (20 minute) papers and creative presentations. The IAVC’s conferences work to achieve a balance between thoughtful and attentive listening and animated discussion. Speakers will be prepared for both.

Please submit your 300 to 400 word proposal, a 100 to 200 word biography in a single running Word document or PDF to greetingsIAVC@gmail.com by May 1, 2020. Please title your document in the form of “your surname_abstract_IAVC2020”.

We will announce our conference program in late Spring 2020.

Confirmed guests include: David Ayala-Alfonso (Independent Curators International, USA/Colombia); Manca Bajec (Biennial Foundation, London/New York); Brooke Belisle (Stony Brook University, USA); Irene Chien (Muhlenberg College, USA); Jae Emerling (The University of North Carolina at Charlotte, USA); Jennifer González (University of California Santa Cruz, USA); Natalija Majsova (Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium and University of Ljubljana, Slovenia); Joanne Morra (Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design, University of the Arts London, UK); Rahul Mukherjee (University of Pennsylvania, USA); Krešimir Purgar (Academy of Arts and Culture, J. J. Strossmayer University, Croatia); Irit Rogoff (Goldsmiths, University of London, UK); Marquard Smith (University College London, UK / Vilnius Academy of Arts, Lithuania); Nina Trivedi (Royal College of Art, UK); and Øyvind Vågnes (University of Bergen, Norway).

UNIRI Moise Palace: Cres

The Moise Palace – an education center of the University of Rijeka

This five-hundred-year-old patrician townhouse is the largest Renaissance palace on the Croatian island of Cres. A venue and forum for various scientific and research activities, it welcomes visiting academics, students, artists, as well as teams of experts and practitioners wishing to withdraw for a moment to a serene and inspiring working setting.

 

Seminar With Oszkár‎ Roginer: “/self/perception of minorities and knowledge production”

“The research project proposed a comprehensive analysis of a structural flaw in the social sciences and humanities, which is similar to – or even part of – methodologic nationalism. A concept, which is proposed by many scholars of late-modern nationalism studies, migration studies, globalisation studies, global history, historical sociology, comparative literature, and which emerged as a specific form of an analytic problem in research of Central- and Southeast European ethnic minorities as well. Encountered first in the Hungarian minorities in the post-Yugoslav states, Romania, Ukraine and Slovakia, the problem is also present in the research on Albanian minorities in Macedonia, Serbia and Montenegro; Serbian minorities in Kosovo and Montenegro, the German minority in Italy, or even smaller communities like Czechs in Banat, Croats in Molise or Arbanasi in Zadar, as well as other ethnic or religious groups and metropolitan diasporas throughout the continent. A similar methodological perception can be seen in case of the Armenian, Jewish and Roma communities, as well as in the research of current migration flows and refugees throughout Europe. From the viewpoint of a state’s population, all these types of non-majority communities share a specific perception in research, which is insular, often simplistic and analytically insufficient.

Imagining the inter-state system as a set of bordering containers, the country in which the given minority lives is considered as the elementary frame of research. This way however, neither the findings nor the conclusions did usually not extend beyond state borders, while in most cases, they stayed within the inhabited region of the given minority. Furthermore, this insular (self)perception is hallmarked by a discourse of exclusion, oppression, denial and rejection throughout the 20th century, which in turn is almost without exception understood as a unique signifier of the researched minority. These, and a number of other delimiting circumstances left only the given nation-state as the sole point of reference, moreover as an agent of exclusion from participation, and denial of rights. This resulted in an archipelagic logic of ethnic minorities throughout the 20th century and determined most research trajectories since the early 1920’s, up until contemporary scholarly work. Traditionally, research on ethnic minorities has been mostly done in the fields of history, ethnography and literature, supplemented by sociology, political science, art history and architecture in the past three decades. It addressed folklore, literary production and a number of historical topics, while there is a focus since the 1990’s on demography, European integration and peace-building as well. Nevertheless, this structural flaw can be traced throughout the 20th century until today, and it can be accepted to some degree within the hard inter-state system of borders in the era of modern, industrialised nation-states. It is however more and more questionable in the last decades, when cross-border cooperation, migration and flow of commodities increases, and when the rejections from the side of majorities are rendered irrelevant.
The aim of my research is thus, to point out the deficiencies in the (self)perception of minorities, by which the inter-state system is imagined as a combination of bordering containers, with minorities as secluded subsystems of these societies. Moreover, the inquiry attempts to contest the binary structure of majority-minority, address it beyond methodologic nationalism, and by deconstructing the conventional perceptions of time, space and social realities, lift up the narrow composition of the conceptual imagination in a world, where (various) ethnicities are more interconnected, than ever before. By questioning these routine assumptions, I will tried put them in a historical perspective as well, and define a framework from which research on minorities should be emancipated.”

Oszkár Roginer was born in 1986, in Novi Sad, Yugoslavia, where he studied Hungarian Studies at the University of Novi Sad (Serbia). After receiving his diploma in 2009, he moved to the University of Pécs (Hungary) in order to pursue his PhD in Literary Sciences, and defending his thesis in 2016. In 2014 he started an International Joint Degree MA in Cultural Sociology at the University of Zadar (Croatia) and the Karl Franzens University in Graz (Austria), and obtaining his MA in 2016. He is currently a PhD candidate at the Centre for Southeast European Studies in Graz, where he is working on his thesis on the construction of the Hungarian minority literary field in the post-Habsburg space. Between 2009 and 2014 he worked as a radio journalist and theatre critic in RTV Vojvodina, and in the daily newspaper Magyar Szó in Novi Sad. His most important publications include the monographs A város mint (ellen)érv. [The City as a (counter)argument]. (2015), and A jugoszláviai magyar irodalom terei – A (poszt)jugoszláv magyar irodalom és a téralapú közösségi identitás-konstrukciók viszonya a sajtóban (1945–2010)[Terrains of Hungarian Literature from Yugoslavia – Correlations between (post)Yugoslav Hungarian Literature and the constructions of spatial collective identities in the press (1945–2010)]. (2019) His academic interests lay in Hungarian minority literature, Hungarian press history of Yugoslavia, geocriticism, historical literary sociology, collective identities, memory studies.

Seminar with Oszkár Roginer in dialogue with UNIRI CAS SEE fellows was held at the University campus in Rijeka on December 6, 2019.