dr. sc. Sanja Bojanić

Open-source Institutions Talks III

Open-source Institutions Talks 3

October 14th, 15th, and 23rd, 2020

Organized by Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe

The intelligence of the next generation of European institutions hinges on a system of technologically-mediated participatory policy-making and problem-solving.

Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe (University of Rijeka) is currently developing a project in collaboration with RadicalxChange Foundation, that will test and examine several variants of vTaiwan model for open-source governance in the context of european institutions. For purposes of developing this project, we are organizing a series of talks on the relevant contemporary developments in institutional designs that utilize collective intelligence.

First two workshops featured talks from E. Glen Weyl (RadicalxChange Foundation, Microsoft), Anne de Zeeuw (Netwerk Democratie) and Shu Yang Lin (vTaiwan), providing introduction to the work of their organizations and social movements, and feedback on the methodological and project development drafts.

This third and final workshop will feature a talk by Melanija Đurović and Boško Savić (Intrinsic) on the development of algorithms in the field of market research, with a particular focus on adjusting sentiment analysis algorithms to languages. Furthermore, the workshop will feature a talk by Marija Katalinić and Bernard Koludrović (Rijeka 2020 – European Capital of Culture / RiHub) on the topic of Citizens’ Council, which was developed as a part of Rijeka 2020 – ECoC for purposes of deliberating and grading citizens’ urban, cultural and ecological projects.

Program:

14. 10. Marija Katalinić and Bernard Koludrović
(Rijeka 2020 – European Capital of Culture / RiHub):
Citizens’ Council

 

15. 10. Melanija Đurović and Boško Savić
(Intrinsic):
Algorithm Development

23. 10. Sanja Bojanić, Kristina Stojanović-Čehajić, Marko-Luka Zubčić
(Center for Advanced Studies South East Europe):
Towards Open-source Institutions in Europe
– Lessons Learned and Next Steps

(The workshop is a part of “AI and Democracy” program funded by University of Rijeka.)

The Archipelagos of the Living

We are inviting you to participate in a workshop in the afternoon, September 3rd, to discuss the Archipelagos of the Living, a cross-country laboratory territory seeking to develop sustainable modes of life and living on Island territories.

The workshop follows from the seminar hosted by l’IRI and L’Association des amis de la génération Thunberg last June, which consisted of presentations of work already being done on the different territories : on Corsica, Cres, Sherkin in Ireland, the Galapagos Islands and Ile-Saint-Denis. Our goal at this stage is to begin implicating local actors in these discussions, to take the proposition of contributory seriously. Being unable to visit the territories, we have decided to structure the afternoon around testimonies that Sanja Bojanic and Sarah Czerny have collected from dairy farmers from Cres. We hope that working from local perspectives, concerns and savoirs-faire, will allow us to identify potential niches for contributory research, all the while touching on the methodological challenges researches are likely to meet across territories when beginning to translate the theoretical framwork behind contributory research into (multiple) practice(s).

The last part of the workshop will be consecrated to a discussion around how to practically structure the project Archipelagos of the Living the organology of the project so to speak – across different territories, different universities and on different scales; in the short-term, long-term and in the specific reality posed by post-Covid-19.

A follow-up on the first Archipelagos have happen on October 1, 2020, with friends and colleagues from the Galapagos Islands: Ester, Jose Guerrero Vera, Pablo and Noel.

 

You can also read ARCHIPEL DES VIVANTES, one of the last texts by Bernard Stiegler published in Etica & Politica (in French).

Open-Source Institution Talks II

Open-Source Institutions Talks 2

September 3-4, 2020

Organized by Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe

The intelligence of the next generation of European institutions hinges on a system of technologically-mediated participatory policy-making and problem-solving.

Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe (University of Rijeka) is currently developing a project in collaboration with RadicalxChange Foundation, which will test and examine several variants of vTaiwan model for open-source governance in the context of European institutions. For purposes of developing this project, we are organizing a series of talks on the relevant contemporary developments in institutional designs that utilize collective intelligence.

The workshop featured in the review of the project methodology by Shu Yang Lin, the interaction designer and vTaiwan collaborator.

Program:

3.9. Shu Yang Lin (vTaiwan) in conversation with Sanja Bojanić, Kristina Stojanović-Čehajić, Marko-Luka Zubčić, Vladan Šutanovac (Center for Advanced Studies South East Europe): Towards Open-Source Institutions in Europe – Methodology Review

 

4.9. Sanja Bojanić, Kristina Stojanović-Čehajić, Marko-Luka Zubčić, Vladan Šutanovac (Center for Advanced Studies South East Europe): Towards Open-Source Institutions in Europe – Methodology Development

(The workshop is a part of “AI and Democracy” program funded by the University of Rijeka.)

 

The Moise Palace – From Oblivion to an Incubator of Knowledges and Skills

The Croatian island of Cres is an outstanding place to plan getting lost in while discovering its bays and ports, old towns and narrow paths, chimerical legends, and the cultural heritage dating since the Roman days. In 2020, Cres became even more engaging for the intellectual wanderer due to the opening of the Moise Palace, a 16th-century palace the islanders never knew they had. On July 24th, Rijeka’s daily paper, the Novi list, brought the story of the Moise being “Torn from Oblivion”.

The 500-year-old patrician palace has this year become the University of Rijeka’s educational and research center, prior to which it was a famous ruin, erroneously considered to have been an old residential complex. The reason for its neglect during the 20th century was in its being inhabited by the poor and the outcast in society, so the building got nicknamed “Biafra”, as to indicate the caste it stood for during this time. It was only in the late 2000s that the newest research found the “old ghost house” to in fact be the largest Renaissance palace on the Croatian islands. Build in the mid-1550s, the Moise Palace once belonged to the famous aristocratic family of Petris. Given that the Petris collaborated with the Habsburg Empire, their presence was precarious in the then Venetian Cres, yet the family persevered, leaving traces of their political thought, interests, and education in the shapes of the many symbols and murals found in the palace. The palace was added-on in the 19th century, then belonging to another Croatian-Italian aristocratic line, the Moise, thus inheriting the name. This chimerical legend, a palace standing on a natural water spring in the middle of the old-town Cres, now stands to tell yet another interesting story, one which has just begun.

Today, the Moise Palace is a scientific-educational center, an island hub run by the University of Rijeka, where it’s all about being present, dynamic, informed, connected, and – hybrid. The palace is conceived to stand out both as a place and as a principle: to serve the community whilst charging it with new practices and knowledges, and sharing its own local knowledge with the world in an engaging and intimate (personal) way.

For this reason, two of the University’s centers are running the Moise now: Centre for Advanced Studies Southeast Europe and the Centre for Studies and Lifelong Learning. To make things simple, the job of the one university Centre (CSLL) is to share Cres with the world, while the other Centre (CAS SEE) is to bring the world to Cres, doing so by fulfilling its core activities of coordination and research work of visiting postdoctoral scientists. The CAS SEE also organizes activities that follow the construction of new economic paradigms by developing a business culture focused around the man and his work. So, the Moise is to expect “a flux of persons and goods in the winter period, after the tourists have gone, when the rains start immersing the narrow passages and aqua alta reaches the palace. Questioning the uncomfortable position of “academic tourists” and looking for elements that disturb the setting from inside, our guests can challenge their traveler’s comfort zones and immerse into the urban-cum-natural tissue of Cres, in order to develop both locally and globally meaningful research and artistic responses to the materials and signals in situ” – Sanja Bojanić explained, the Executive Director of the CAS SEE.

The current Moise Program evolves around various and versatile activities: from the Berlin symphony orchestra “No Borders” rehearsing there this summer, across a specter of engaging lectures and workshops, to an exhibition of the old Cres Dock-09, which has been reinvented for contemporary purposes by an architect infatuated with the island. Much more is to be expected from the Moise Palace in the challenging times to come, and much is planned for the scientific treatment and discussion(s) on issues such as internal migration, settlement dynamics and social practices of the post-war periods in Rijeka, but also for the cognitive and ethno-pragmatic models in the relationship between individuals and public, the reform of the common European asylum system and/or linguistic landscapes, thus bringing and exercising new insights into already known concepts, practices, and worlds.

Architecturally resurrected as an incubator of knowledges and skills, the Moise Palace is becoming a venue and forum for various scientific and research activities, a center welcoming visiting students and artists wishing to withdraw for a moment to a serene and inspiring collaboration setting. In fact, the Moise Palace already is a study haven for those whose intentions are to conduct scientific and artistic work while enjoying the island’s pristine nature. It is a place to restore individual and group wellness while mapping the local and advancing new investigative practices.

 

Original article (Croatian) is available as a typesetting version on page1, page2, and page3.

Open-Source Institutions Talks I

July 29-31, 2020

Organized by Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe

The intelligence of the next generation of European institutions hinges on a system of technologically-mediated participatory policy-making and problem-solving.

The Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe (University of Rijeka) is currently developing a project in collaboration with RadicalxChange Foundation, which will test and examine several variants of vTaiwan model for open-source governance in the context of European institutions. For purposes of developing this project, we have organized a series of talks on the relevant contemporary developments in institutional designs that utilize collective intelligence.

The first workshop featured a CAS SEE Weekly Seminar talk by E. Glen Weyl on the work and vision of the RadicalxChange Foundation, which has taken place on July 30th, 2020.

The second workshop was led by Anne de Zeeuw, who presented the work of Netwerk Democratie, an organization dedicated to building technologically-assisted participatory democracy.

Finally, the third workshop introduced Aleksandar Šušnjar from the University of Rijeka, who presented the Young Universities for the Future of Europe network. This is meant to enable a conversation about the development of the project in the context of new European universities as the test site for the next generation of intelligent institutions in Europe.

The workshop ended with the presentation of the project rationale and methodology draft by CAS SEE researchers developing the project.

PROGRAM:

29. 7.  

 

Anne de Zeeuw: Netwerk Democratie

Aleksandar Šušnjar (University of Rijeka):

Young Universities for the Future of Europe

30. 7. CAS SEE Weekly Seminars /

E. Glen Weyl: RadicalxChange

31. 7. Sanja Bojanić, Kristina Stojanović-Čehajić, Marko-Luka Zubčić, Vladan Šutanovac
(Center for Advanced Studies South East Europe):
Towards Open-source Institutions in Europe – The Rationale and the Method

 

(The workshop is a part of the “AI and Democracy” program, funded by the University of Rijeka.)

Discussion on Democracy – “Evenings at the Moise”

Thursday, July 2nd, 2020, was at the Moise Palace on Cres Island reserved for an evening of (re)thinking democracy. The cycle of lectures for citizens continued in the scientific and educational center of the University of Rijeka, in line with the (then) upcoming parliamentary elections. The title of the public discussion held was “How Can We Improve Our Democracy?”

Democracy: Advantages, Disadvantages, Traps, and How We Could Contribute to Its Improvement

After a short introduction in the theory of democracy and a review of the basic forms of government, by dr. sc. Marko-Luka Zubčić, the discussion aimed at questioning democracy and today’s democratic principles and practices took off. It developed into a lively exchange of views with the audience attending the discussion. Is democracy the best form of government? What are its advantages, disadvantages, but also its traps and snares? Are we really well informed and what can we do about it? As people of various professions were present in the audience, the proscribed distance was kept in a non-proscribed discussion, enriched with arguments and opinions from various aspects of the immediate social body.