Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory

Re-inventing/reconstructing cosmopolitanism in contested spaces and post-conflict zones – Call for Papers

The Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory (University of Belgrade), The Center for Advanced Studies Southeast Europe (University of Rijeka-Cres), The George and Irina Schaeffer Center for the Study of Genocide, Human Rights and Conflict Prevention, The American University of Paris (Paris), The Centre de recherches internationales (SciencesPo-CERI) and The Faculty of Media and Communications (Belgrade)

Re-inventing/reconstructing cosmopolitanism in contested spaces and post-conflict zones

 25–27 May 2022

“The life of the other, the life that is not our own, is also our life since whatever sense ‘our’ life has is derived precisely from this sociality, this being already, and from the start, dependent on a world of others, constituted in and by a social world”. The other of Judith Butler is the universe of others to whom we are inescapably intertwined, irrespective of the arbitrariness of birth, borders, and the cultural particularism that segment social space, and to whom we are joined in “unchosen cohabitation” through the proximities wrought by the historical encounters, frictions, and collisions of people(s).

The purpose of this international conference is to encourage a multi- and transdisciplinary discussion of one of the core analytical and normative problems of our troubled present: the challenge of cultivating inclusive civic and social spaces at a moment when the difference is ubiquitously threatened by exclusionary ethno-nationalisms, the construction of material and symbolic walls of separation, spaces of conflict, and violence-laden representations of the essential alienness of cultural, political, and religious others.

We welcome critical examinations of this problem in various socio-spatial and temporal contexts – refugee flows and transnational migrations generated by poverty and war, civil conflicts and interactions in the world’s border areas and megacities where “North and South” and “East and West” uneasily meet, post-conflict zones at the edges of and in the interstices of states and empire(s)…We aim to broaden the scope to reflections on the necessary rethinking/reinvention/reconstitution of cosmopolitan space(s) challenged by social conflicts, war and/or mass violence.

A summer school will be held in conjunction with the conference. More information on the program, calendar, and registration will be provided in the Fall.

THE VENUE

The Cres antenna of the Center for Advanced Studies Southeast Europe of the University of Rijeka is an emblematic venue for these themes: the Adriatic has always been a crossroads of transnational circulations (people, ideas, and goods), with multiple overlapping and intersecting cultural belongings and political identities. As Anita Sujoldžić has pointed out, until the early twentieth century, there were “firmly connected social spaces”’ in the Habsburg Empire “that cut across anachronistically drawn linguistic and ethno-national lines”, and “in which multiple allegiances (imperial, national, provincial or local) with both cosmopolitan and culturally contingent loyalties could be found.” The region has also, of course, been a locus of sharp ethno-nationalist divisions and armed conflicts, which have submerged the cosmopolitan lifeworlds that today should be purposely reconstituted.

SUGGESTED TOPICS FOR PAPERS:

  • Theoretical and philosophical foundations of cosmopolitanism.
  • Social science inquiry into the dynamics and precursors of social violence leading to disassembling of cosmopolitan space(s)
  • Historical examination of inclusive societies; their establishment and disassembling
  • Innovative interventions and other forms of social activism designed to reconcile conflict and promote co-existence
  • Memory controversies and efforts to address conflicting readings of the cosmopolitan past
  • Cosmopolitan critiques of globalisation and problems of global justice
  • The crisis of hospitality and the sociohistory of the labels of “othering” (refugees,   immigrants, ex-patriot, asylees, displaced persons, IDPs (internally displaced persons), PRSs, stateless persons, etc.)
  • Rethinking cosmopolitanism in Jewish history
  • Peace theory and cosmopolitanism
  • Anti-cosmopolitan rhetorics

ELIGIBILITY 

Applicants should be researchers, post-graduate students, and post-docs interested in or working on the above topics. We also welcome applications from civil society activists bringing particular insights to the conference’s content. Applicants from all countries are eligible to apply.

APPLICATION

/ All applicants should send a short bio and abstract to cosmocres2022@gmail.com no later than September 15th, 2021. We will get back to you by November 15th, 2021.

/ Abstracts should be 500 words max. for a presentation not exceeding 20 mins.

/ Participation fee: 180€ for faculty members; 100€ for students (limited financial aid can be made available to select participants in need, upon examination of their requests).

INFORMATION

Organizers will facilitate arranging accommodation in Cres city and its surroundings on the island of Cres but we kindly ask participants to emphasize if they opt for this option in their application. If any further details are needed, please contact us at cosmocres2022@gmail.com

A venue and forum for various scientific and research activities, the University of Rijeka’s Center for Advanced Studies Southeast Europe welcome visiting students and artists wishing to withdraw for a moment to a serene and inspiring collaboration setting.

We very much hope this event can happen in person. As the epidemiological situation shifts, we will need to decide what is feasible by the end of 2021. If need be we are technically equipped and prepared to transition our event to an online hybrid format.

SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE:

Brian Schiff, Philip Spero Golub, Gazela Pudar Drasko, Zona Zaric, Eileen Lallier, Sanja Bojanic, Constance Pâris de Bollardière, Petar Bojanic, Nadege Ragaru, Vera Mevorah. Dragana Stojanovic

ORGANIZATION BOARD:

Brian Schiff, Nadege Ragaru, Zona Zaric, Dragana Stojanovic, Sanja Bojanic, Petar Bojanic,Vera Mevorah

International Conference: The Epistemic Circumstances of Democracy

The Epistemic Circumstances of Democracy

29th January 2021, 9:00 am – 7:30 pm (CET)

In both academia and layperson political culture, democracy has been enshrined as the system that best respects every citizen’s freedom and political equality. However, it is worth inquiring whether average voters – some of whom are neither informed nor unbiased and impartial – can be trusted to choose the correct option. For decades, studies in political epistemology, political science, and sociology have shown that citizens do not possess the most basic political knowledge and cannot even articulate their moral values. How can their electoral choices reflect the real common good? Those skeptical of democracy point to additional problems at play. Empirical evidence seems to suggest that partisanship is likely to devolve into polarization. Due to their function of representing a particular ideology, political parties often resemble echo chambers, closed epistemic structures that sequester their supporters from opposing viewpoints. Likewise, diverse media platforms, often hailed as good for democracy, make it easy for citizens to select those networks that best agree with their biases, further polarizing their beliefs. These apprehensions raise the question of whether the empirical epistemic circumstances of democracy in modern societies are so flawed that democracy has become another concept that functions only in theory, only to disappoint in real life.

On the other side of the spectrum, proponents of democracy argue the Condorcet Jury Theorem implies that minimally competent, sincere, and independent voters are, when amassed, almost entirely likely to make the correct decision. According to the original Condorcet Jury Theory, as long as voters are merely more probable than random to be right, are independent of each other, and do not vote strategically, the likelihood they are correct converges to certainty the more numerous they are. As a consequence, millions of citizens just slightly above average outperform even the most brilliant individuals. Besides, those eager to defend democratic decision-making stress that diversity reaps copious epistemic benefits: a handful of experts cannot match the political relevance of ordinary citizens’ judgments of their priorities and living conditions. Epistocracy and aristocracy are bound to remain overly elitist for a decent alternative to democracy.

This conference, keeping the debate’s complexity in mind, aims to examine whether democracy can outlast its harshest critics. Can Condorcet Jury Theorem’s requirements survive the real epistemic circumstances of democracy? Are empirical citizens ever genuinely independent of each other, and do our biases make us collectively worse than chance at making the correct choice?  Are political polarization, extremism, and voter ignorance too high a price for diversity? How can democracy be modified to both preserve its advantages and cancel its failures? The represented viewpoints include theorists ranging from those comprehensively distrustful of democracy, over epistemic democrats, to procedural democrats.

Conference program

Organizers:

Center for Advanced Studies Southeast Europe, University of Rijeka
Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade
Hana Samaržija / University of Zagreb

Watch The Epistemic Circumstances of Democracy:

 

International Conference “Horizons of Engagement: Eternalizing Pierre Bourdieu”

22. December – 23. December

The conference “Eternalizing Bourdieu” is organized on the occasion of the ninetieth anniversary of the birth of Pierre Bourdieu (1930–2002), the world’s most-cited sociologist. The achievements of Bourdieu’s academic work are reflected in the high institutional positions he held, such as the position of the general secretary of the Centre de sociologie européenne, the position of the studies director of the École des hautes études en sciences socials and the position of the professor of sociology at Collège de France. His academic work has also been awarded with numerous accolades like the “Golden Medal”, the highest acknowledgment of the French Centre national de la recherche scienti que and the “Huxley” medal, the highest acknowledgment of the Royal Institute of Great Britain and Ireland. The greatest indicator of the scope of Bourdieu’s in science is the fact that we are talking about the world’s most-cited sociologist, ahead of Émile Durkheim and the world’s second most cited author in social sciences and humanities, after Michel Foucault and ahead of Jacques Derrida. As LoÏc Wacquant pointed out: “Bourdieu became a name for a collective research endeavor that transcends the borders of states and disciplines”.

All of Bourdieu’s major works contain a thorough critique of the elements of the established social order: from the school system (in “Reproduction”) to the aristocratic pretensions of the dominant class (in “The Distinction”) and the state as the instrument of the dominant class (in “State Nobility”). Establish and publicly announce the reality of the social world becomes, in his vision, the main stake of the social struggle. Precisely because of that, he criticizes the artificial separation between scientific work that produces knowledge and intellectual engagement that introduces that knowledge into the public sphere. After rarely taking a stand on current political issues with the publishing of “The Weight of the World” in 1993. – in which he pleads for a ‘different way of doing politics’ – Bourdieu became one of the most engaged French intellectuals. The support for strikers, support for the unemployed who blocked École normale supérieure, supporting Algerian intellectuals, and supporting European social movements are just some of the most famous of Bourdieu’s public appearances through which he earned the status of the “main enemy” among the most prominent defenders of the neoliberal order in the French intellectual eld.

The aim of this conference is to familiarise the domestic and regional audiences with the work of Pierre Bourdieu, by presenting his academic work alongside his public engagement. The conference will consist of several thematic segments which will introduce some basic concepts and methodological approaches that appear in his work and Bourdieu’s relationship with some of the most significant authors from his intellectual milieu, as well as the most important theoretical approaches in sociology. The last segment of the conference will deal with Bourdieu’s public engagement and his understanding of the public roles of intellectuals.

Conference program
Book of abstracts
Register here

 

ORGANISERS:

Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade
Center for Advanced Studies Southeast Europe, University of Rijeka
École Normale Supérieure, Paris
Institut français de Serbie

ORGANISING COMMITTEE:

Ivica Mladenović, Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade
Zona Zarić, Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade
Milan Urošević, Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade

PROGRAM COMMITTEE:

Marc Crépon, École Normale Supérieure, Paris
Ivana Spasić, Faculty of Philosophy, University of Belgrade
Laurent Jeanpierre, University of Paris I (Sorbonne)
Adriana Zaharijević, Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade
Philip Golub, American University of Paris

Horizons of Freedom: The Cunning of Freedom in times of a Twin Authoritarianism

On Friday, November 6th, from 11:30 am to 12:30 pm, Yanis Varoufakis gave a talk entitled The Cunning of Freedom in times of a Twin Authoritarianism within the annual series Horizons of Freedom.

As capitalism is transforming into a species of technofeudalism, two seemingly mutually opposing authoritarianisms are rising up. Can an authentic freedom survive these circumstances and culminate into a progressive alternative worth fighting for?

Yanis Varoufakis is a member of the Greek Parliament, Professor of Economics at the University of Athens; Honorary Professor of Political Economy at the University of Sydney; Honorary Professor of Law, Economics and Finance at the University of Turin; Distinguished Visiting Professor of Political Economy at Kings College, University of London.

Portrait by DANAE STRATOU

The series Horizons of Freedom has been organized in cooperation with Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade.

Watch the talk with Yanis Varoufakis:

Horizons of Freedom: On Political Action

On Thursday, October 29th, from 4 to 6 pm, Michael Walzer gave a talk entitled On Political Action within the first event of the annual series Horizons of Freedom.

Michael Walzer’s book Political action: A practical Guide to Movement Politics could be used as an example of how much insightful literature can generate an impression that history has a tendency to repeat itself. The book was initially published 1971 right after American bombing of Cambodia. As the author recalls in the preface to the 2019 reissued edition, this time was marked by a sense of disillusionment with the great tide of activism of the previous decade. Given how much the book remains relevant today, one could argue that this feeling of ubiquitous cynicism has never stop perpetuating itself within the left-wing movement(s). Walzer’s Political Action tackles these issues in a truly approachable and yet discerning manner. Although his main recommendation to the future engaged actors is to focus their attention to concrete issues and arguments and to acknowledge that this approach does not necessarily lead to grand theories of social change, Walzer’s insights still escape the ever-increasing fragmentation of the public sphere generated by the various forms of neoliberal regimes. He is able to avoid this pitfall by advocating an inherent sociability of encounters over pressing social issues which can ultimately transform the I into We and generate long lasting commitments. This is perhaps why this book has aged so well: it asks us to reflect upon connection of radical change and (practical) acts that a group needs to take in order to remain an engaged group.

Photo by PETER VALCK

The series Horizons of Freedom has been organized in cooperation with Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade.

Watch the talk with Michael Walzer:

 

International colloquium with Axel Honneth “Democracy, Socialism and Engagement: Axel Honneth and Critical Theory Today”

Belgrade, June 21-22, 2019

Critical Theory today faces a daunting triple challenge: to explain the far-reaching societal transformations that have undermined democracy across the globe over the past decade, justify the normative foundations for the critique of these processes in universalist terms, and present a vision of the good society that can provide, not just normative orientation, but political inspiration to different kinds of progressive social engagement – all this without succumbing to the dangers of epistemological authoritarianism and the consequent particularism of its own diagnosis. Perhaps more than any other author, Axel Honneth has devoted himself to synthesizing these fundamental tasks of Critical Theory within one comprehensive theoretical perspective. From his early criticism of Habermas to his mature theory of recognition, Honneth has sought to formulate a critique of injustice and domination in contemporary capitalism that would at the same time provide social-theoretical insight into the deep-seated causes of persistent forms of injustice, be post-metaphysical enough to adequately respond to the charges of essentialism, particularism and perfectionism, and overcome epistemological authoritarianism through developing a particular sensitivity for the experiences of ordinary social actors. The culmination of this project is Honneth’s mature Neo-Hegelian perspective centred around the concept of “social freedom” and developed most thoroughly in his two recent complementary studies, Freedom’s Right and The Idea of Socialism. Starting from Honneth’s perspective as exemplary of Critical Theory in its most self-reflexive and nuanced incarnation, this international colloquium will examine the potentials of Critical Theory today to provide conceptual tools for diagnosing and overcoming injustice in the age of complex forms of social domination and the dismantling of liberal democracy from two supposedly juxtaposed directions: those of technocratic “radical centrism” and right-wing populism.

Programme
Friday, 21. June

Venue: Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory (IFDT)

10:00 | Smail Rapić, University of Wuppertal

Honneths Marx-Kritik in Die Idee des Sozialismus – eine Entgegnung (Honneth’s Critique of Marx in The Idea of Socialism  – a Response)

12:00 | Charles Djordjevic, University of Zürich

Recognizing Expressions of Pain: Honneth, Wittgenstein, and the Normative Underpinnings of the Social World

14:00 | Lunch

Venue: Kolarac Open University, Mala sala (Small Lecture Hall)

17:00 | Petar Bojanić, Director of the Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade

Welcome address followed by the Ceremony of the Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory’s Annual Award for Critical Engagement “Miladin Životić”

17:15 | Axel Honneth, Columbia University

Award Lecture: Democracy and the Division of Labor. A blind spot in political philosophy

18:15 | Smail Rapić, University of Wuppertal

Snježana Prijić-Samaržija, University of Rijeka

Marjan Ivković, the Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade

Comments on Axel Honneth’s Award Lecture

Saturday, 22. June

Venue: Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory (IFDT)

09:00 | Seminar with Axel Honneth on the book The Idea of Socialism: Towards a Renewal (Die Idee des Sozialismus: Versuch einer Aktualisierung).

Participants: Željko Radinković, Predrag Krstić, Aleksandar Fatić, Rastko Jovanov, Marjan Ivković, Srdjan Prodanović, Jelena Vasiljević, Adriana Zaharijević, Igor Cvejić, Mark Lošonc (Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory), Đorđe Pavićević (University of Belgrade), Simon Pistor (University of Zürich), and author

12:30 | Lunch

13:00 | Zdravko Kobe, University of Ljubljana

Transformation of Public Knowing: Some Hegelian Remarks in Honneth’s Mode

15:00 | Marco Solinas, Sant’Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa

The Actuality of Marx’s Errors. Neoliberalism and Honneth’s Idea of Socialism


Towards a Harmony of Epistemic and Political Virtues: Seminar on Snježana Prijić-Samaržija’s “Democracy and Truth”

Belgrade, June 20, 2019 at 3.00 pm
Venue: Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory (IFDT)

Address: Kraljice Natalije 45, 11000 Belgrade (4th Floor, Conference Room)

Snježana Prijić-Samaržija’s Democracy and Truth: The Conflict Between Political and Epistemic Virtues (2018) has a two-fold task. First, the book, generally speaking, aims to justify the application of epistemology to real-world situations in order to improve societal epistemic processes and the assessment of socially held beliefs. Second, and more specifically, the book grapples with a pertinent dilemma: when assessing social practices, institutions, and systems, should we sacrifice epistemic virtues for ethical and political virtues or vice versa? Prijić-Samaržija rejects this reasoning as a case of a false dilemma and offers a hybrid proposal which can satisfy, at the same time, political requirements and produce beliefs/judgments/decisions of high epistemic quality. She then argues that her preferred hybrid model – reliability democracy – has the highest likelihood of producing evaluations equally respectful of both values.

Participants: Petar Bojanić (University of Belgrade, Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory), Igor Cvejić (University of Belgrade, Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory), Vedran Džihić (Austrian Institute for International Affairs and University of Vienna, Institute for Political Sciences), Biljana Đorđević (University of Belgrade, Faculty of Political Sciences), Aleksandar Fatić (University of Belgrade, Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory), Marjan Ivković (University of Belgrade, Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory), Ivana Janković (University of Belgrade, Faculty of Philosophy), Marko Konjović (University of Belgrade, Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory), Ivan Mladenović (University of Belgrade, Faculty of Philosophy), Srđan Prodanović (University of Belgrade, Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory), Bojana Radovanović (University of Belgrade, Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory), Smail Rapić (University of Wuppertal, Department of Philosophy) and Marko Luka Zubčić (University of Rijeka, Faculty of Philosophy)

Moderators: Marko Konjović (University of Belgrade, Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory) Bojana Radovanović (University of Belgrade, Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory)

Snježana Prijić-Samaržija is currently the Rector of the University of Rijeka as well as a Full Professor at the Department of Philosophy, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences in Rijeka. She received her BA Degree from the University of Belgrade, her Master Degree from the University of Ljubljana, and her PhD Degree from the University of Zagreb, all in philosophy. Prijić-Samaržija is the author of six books, such as: “Oko i svijet” [Eye and the World] (1995), “Društvo i spoznaja” [Society and Cognition] (2000), “Praktična etika” [Practical Ethics] (2007, with Elvio Baccarini), and “Antička i novovjekovna epistemologija” [Ancient and Modern Epistemology] (2011, with Ana Gavran Miloš). Her latest book is entitled Democracy and Truth: The Conflict Between Political and Epistemic Virtues (2018). Prijić-Samaržija also edited 13 books, published more than 70 papers, and translated several articles. Her main areas of academic interest are social philosophy, epistemology, applied ethics, and gender studies.


 

Fellows at the “TESTIMONY. POETRY. LANGUAGE.” Conference

The conference investigated the concept of testimony, notably war testimony, from different perspectives, i.e., literature, philosophy, sociology and political activism.

The first day of the conference and a roundtable on the third day were entirely devoted to the analysis of the holocaust poet Paul Celan through the contributions of Sue Vice, Pajari Räsänen, Matthew Boswell and Nina Čolović. A philosophical analysis of Celan’s poetry was provided by Petar Bojanić, while Bertrand Badiou was a key figure, providing testimony of Paul Celan’s poetry and biography.

The second day, with panels chaired by CAS Fellows Mónica Cano Abadía and Olimpia Loddo, focused on the role played by poetry in the testimony of the Yugoslav war. A first-hand testimony was offered by the Bosnian writer Asmir Kujović, while Lidija Dimkovska, a Macedonian writer based in Slovenia, paid a moving tribute to a long list of writers that are the voice of a post-Yugoslav languages. Andrijana Kos-Lajtman analyzed the influence of Dadaism on Manifest Mlade Bosne by Darko Cvijetić. Senadin Musabegović described the role played by poetry in testifying the real face of nationalism.

In the panel “Rhetoric, Politics and Poetry after Yugoslav Wars,” Jay Surdukowski showed how Radovan Karadžić used poetry to justify his war crimes. In her presentation To War or to Write, Elizabeta Šeleva described poetry as a means to redesign reality through the creation of an alternative “literary ought.” Goran Lazičić described the rhetoric and politics of testimony in the novels of the Serbian writers Svetislav Basara and David Albahari.

During the third day of the conference, with panels chaired by CAS Fellow Davide Pala, Olivera Marković-Savić showed the use and misuse of the term ‘veteran’ after the end of the Yugoslavian war, and she stressed the legal misrecognition of veterans by the Serbian state. Šeherzada Džafić talked about poetry focussing on war as a powerful form of both testimony and ethical learning, while Selma Zilić Šiljak presented the clash between dominant narratives of war and the horizontal and private accounts of it in Velika Kladuša.

In the first panel of the fourth and last day, chaired by CAS Fellow Mišo Kapetanović, Cornelia Grabner gave voice to the Movement for Peace in Mexico, while Robert von Hallberg focused on the relationship between testimony and poetry in the US. Danijela Majstorović shared her research on the construction of the Yugoslav new woman and the role of the Women’s Antifascist Front (AFŽ). Marzuq Al Halabi talked about Mahmoud Darwish, the prophet of the Palestinian revolution who created a bridge between Palestine and other international movements.

The last panel, chaired by Marco Abram (Osservatorio Balcani e Caucaso), revolved around memorial sites in Rwanda (Matthew Boswell) and the role of women poets in the peace process in Colombia (Cherilyn Elston). Afterwards, Djurdja Trajković moderated a roundtable in which the role of poetry as a form of testimony was discussed. A poetry reading about conflicts in peripheral capitalism closed the conference.

After the conference, the Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory of Belgrade hosted one workshop and two lectures. The workshop consisted in a critical discussion of the important book “Race, Nation, Class: Ambiguous Identities” by Etienne Balibar and Immanuel Wallerstein. Fourteen commentators highlighted different aspects of it, e.g., the relation between race and nation (e.g., Carlo Burelli, Davide Pala), on the one hand, and the link between race and gender, on the other hand (e.g., Mónica Cano Abadía). Djurdja Trajković closed the workshop by stressing the strict historical connections between nationalism, racism, and classism. The first lecture, given by Manuela Bojadžijev and entitled “Is (neo-)racism a form of violence of the past?”, provided a conceptualization of the distinctive features of racism and a great overview of the main literature analyzing racism from the 50’s onwards. The second lecture, given by Sanja Milutinović Bojanić and entitled “Rhetoric of Emancipation vs. Rhetoric of Misogyny”, showed the central traits of the rhetoric of both emancipation and misogyny and illustrated them through the analysis of several historical occurrences of both emancipation and misogyny.

– CAS SEE Fellows

“Race, Nation, Class’: Ambiguous Identities” international seminar with CAS SEE fellows

The coming year will mark three decades since the publication of Immanuel Wallerstein’s and Etienne Balibar’s seminal work Race, Nation, Class: Ambiguous Identities. The book, characterized by a specific ”dialogical” structure, has become influential in the study of racism and in the interdisciplinary school of cultural studies. The publication of the work was preceded by a series of Wallerstein’s and Balibar’s debates at the Maison des sciences de l’homme in Paris between 1985 and 1987. In the course of these encounters, the two authors developed the unique dialogical method, the ”practice-of-theory”, which consisted in the gradual elaboration and intertwining of the three fundamental concepts – race, nation and class – through simultaneous historical-empirical and theoretical analyses.

Wallerstein and Balibar formulate in this study a complex analysis of the roles that the classificatory schemes of race, nation and class played in the process of the genesis and global spreading of capitalism, above all their role in legitimizing the extreme social inequalities that capitalism produces and deepens. Upon the analysis, the authors’ central theoretical claim is that one can identify fissures, ruptures and contradictions in the fabric of the conceptual and empirical inter-imbrication of the three categories, suggesting that any strategy of resistance to forms of social domination grounded in the race-nation-class nexus must identify and exploit these contradictions. The authors finally draw our attention to the fact that the race-nation-class constellation is constantly being reinforced in global capitalism, which also requires constant reflection about new strategies of resistance.

The seminar at the Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory aims to comprehensively reflect on the relevance and heuristic value of Wallerstein’s and Balibar’s study for the present day. Within its temporal limits, the seminar will try to employ the ”practice-of-theory” method of the book in its analysis and attempts at re-actualization. The participants are invited to engage in forms of critical reconstruction, either of particular aspects of the book or its whole, and to explore avenues for the possible application of Wallerstein’s and Balibar’s perspective in analyzing manifold ways in which the fundamental categories of race, class and nation are (individually or synthetically) today used to legitimize or challenge capitalism, globally as well as in the region of former Yugoslavia.

Time: December 18th 2017 at 14:30

Venue: Belgrade, Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory (address: Kraljice Natalije 45, 4th Floor)

Program

14:30 – 14:40  | Welcome Word – Petar Bojanić (Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade)

14:40 – 15:00  | Introductory Remarks – Manuela Bojadžijev (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin/Berliner Institut für empirische Integrations-und Migrationsforschung, BIM)

15:00 – 15:20  | Regional Reception – Marjan Ivković i Djurdja Trajković (Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade)

15:20 – 15:35  | Coffee break

15:40 – 19:00  | Reflections on the Book

Participants

Rastko Močnik (University of Ljubljana and Faculty for Media and Communication, Singidunum University, Slovenia and Serbia), Gordan Maslov (Center for Social and Humanities Research, Croatia), Valida Repovac Nikšić (Faculty of Political Science, University of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina), Nataša Sardžoska (Center for Advanced Studies of Southeastern Europe at the University of Rijeka, Croatia), Vedran Džihić (University of Vienna, Austria; Center for Advanced Studies of Southeastern Europe at the University of Rijeka, Croatia), Petar Bojanić (IFDT), Marjan Ivković (IFDT), Srdjan Prodanović (IFDT), Djurdja Trajković (IFDT), Jelena Vasiljević (IFDT), Adriana Zaharijević (IFDT), Carlo Burelli (Center for Advanced Studies of Southeastern Europe at the University of Rijeka, Croatia), Mónica Cano (Center for Advanced Studies of Southeastern Europe at the University of Rijeka, Croatia), Davide Pala (Center for Advanced Studies of Southeastern Europe at the University of Rijeka, Croatia)

Organizing Committee

Petar Bojanić (Center for Ethics, Law and Applied Philosophy; Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade)

Djurdja Trajković (Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade)

Marjan Ivković (Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade)

Partners

Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade

Center for Advanced Studies of Southeastern Europe (CAS SEE), University of Rijeka

Support

Seminar is supported by Haus der Kulturen der Welt (HKV), Berlin