Call for papers

Re-inventing/reconstructing cosmopolitanism in contested spaces and post-conflict zones – Call for Papers

The Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory (University of Belgrade), The Center for Advanced Studies Southeast Europe (University of Rijeka-Cres), The George and Irina Schaeffer Center for the Study of Genocide, Human Rights and Conflict Prevention, The American University of Paris (Paris), The Centre de recherches internationales (SciencesPo-CERI) and The Faculty of Media and Communications (Belgrade)

Re-inventing/reconstructing cosmopolitanism in contested spaces and post-conflict zones

 25–27 May 2022

“The life of the other, the life that is not our own, is also our life since whatever sense ‘our’ life has is derived precisely from this sociality, this being already, and from the start, dependent on a world of others, constituted in and by a social world”. The other of Judith Butler is the universe of others to whom we are inescapably intertwined, irrespective of the arbitrariness of birth, borders, and the cultural particularism that segment social space, and to whom we are joined in “unchosen cohabitation” through the proximities wrought by the historical encounters, frictions, and collisions of people(s).

The purpose of this international conference is to encourage a multi- and transdisciplinary discussion of one of the core analytical and normative problems of our troubled present: the challenge of cultivating inclusive civic and social spaces at a moment when the difference is ubiquitously threatened by exclusionary ethno-nationalisms, the construction of material and symbolic walls of separation, spaces of conflict, and violence-laden representations of the essential alienness of cultural, political, and religious others.

We welcome critical examinations of this problem in various socio-spatial and temporal contexts – refugee flows and transnational migrations generated by poverty and war, civil conflicts and interactions in the world’s border areas and megacities where “North and South” and “East and West” uneasily meet, post-conflict zones at the edges of and in the interstices of states and empire(s)…We aim to broaden the scope to reflections on the necessary rethinking/reinvention/reconstitution of cosmopolitan space(s) challenged by social conflicts, war and/or mass violence.

A summer school will be held in conjunction with the conference. More information on the program, calendar, and registration will be provided in the Fall.

THE VENUE

The Cres antenna of the Center for Advanced Studies Southeast Europe of the University of Rijeka is an emblematic venue for these themes: the Adriatic has always been a crossroads of transnational circulations (people, ideas, and goods), with multiple overlapping and intersecting cultural belongings and political identities. As Anita Sujoldžić has pointed out, until the early twentieth century, there were “firmly connected social spaces”’ in the Habsburg Empire “that cut across anachronistically drawn linguistic and ethno-national lines”, and “in which multiple allegiances (imperial, national, provincial or local) with both cosmopolitan and culturally contingent loyalties could be found.” The region has also, of course, been a locus of sharp ethno-nationalist divisions and armed conflicts, which have submerged the cosmopolitan lifeworlds that today should be purposely reconstituted.

SUGGESTED TOPICS FOR PAPERS:

  • Theoretical and philosophical foundations of cosmopolitanism.
  • Social science inquiry into the dynamics and precursors of social violence leading to disassembling of cosmopolitan space(s)
  • Historical examination of inclusive societies; their establishment and disassembling
  • Innovative interventions and other forms of social activism designed to reconcile conflict and promote co-existence
  • Memory controversies and efforts to address conflicting readings of the cosmopolitan past
  • Cosmopolitan critiques of globalisation and problems of global justice
  • The crisis of hospitality and the sociohistory of the labels of “othering” (refugees,   immigrants, ex-patriot, asylees, displaced persons, IDPs (internally displaced persons), PRSs, stateless persons, etc.)
  • Rethinking cosmopolitanism in Jewish history
  • Peace theory and cosmopolitanism
  • Anti-cosmopolitan rhetorics

ELIGIBILITY 

Applicants should be researchers, post-graduate students, and post-docs interested in or working on the above topics. We also welcome applications from civil society activists bringing particular insights to the conference’s content. Applicants from all countries are eligible to apply.

APPLICATION

/ All applicants should send a short bio and abstract to cosmocres2022@gmail.com no later than September 15th, 2021. We will get back to you by November 15th, 2021.

/ Abstracts should be 500 words max. for a presentation not exceeding 20 mins.

/ Participation fee: 180€ for faculty members; 100€ for students (limited financial aid can be made available to select participants in need, upon examination of their requests).

INFORMATION

Organizers will facilitate arranging accommodation in Cres city and its surroundings on the island of Cres but we kindly ask participants to emphasize if they opt for this option in their application. If any further details are needed, please contact us at cosmocres2022@gmail.com

A venue and forum for various scientific and research activities, the University of Rijeka’s Center for Advanced Studies Southeast Europe welcome visiting students and artists wishing to withdraw for a moment to a serene and inspiring collaboration setting.

We very much hope this event can happen in person. As the epidemiological situation shifts, we will need to decide what is feasible by the end of 2021. If need be we are technically equipped and prepared to transition our event to an online hybrid format.

SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE:

Brian Schiff, Philip Spero Golub, Gazela Pudar Drasko, Zona Zaric, Eileen Lallier, Sanja Bojanic, Constance Pâris de Bollardière, Petar Bojanic, Nadege Ragaru, Vera Mevorah. Dragana Stojanovic

ORGANIZATION BOARD:

Brian Schiff, Nadege Ragaru, Zona Zaric, Dragana Stojanovic, Sanja Bojanic, Petar Bojanic,Vera Mevorah

Semiotic Landscapes of Southeastern Europe – Call for papers

Semiotic Landscapes of Southeastern Europe

(May 28-29, 2021, Island of Cres)

The Center for Advanced Studies of Southeastern Europe (CAS SEE) at University of Rijeka in conjunction with the Berlin Centre for Transnational Border Research “Border Crossings – Crossing Borders” at Humboldt University is organizing a two-day conference (May 28-29, 2021) in Moise Palace on the Island of Cres.

Studying the diversities of human meaning-making on public display allows for expedient insights into visualized social patterns and allows for a wide range of possible research subjects from different disciplines. Drawing on Halliday’s observation that “there can be no semiotic act that leaves the world exactly as it was before” (2002: 254), any instance of shaping the landscape can in itself be seen as both a cause for and a consequence of political, cultural, economic and other meaning-making. The planned conference aims at bringing together recent research considering any such semiotic acts and their interpretation(s) in Southeastern Europe.

The concept of semiotic landscapes, although initially mainly appealing work on writing and image in the public space (Jaworski & Thurlow 2010: 2), neatly embraces various possible occurrences of humans shaping place and creating space. Verbal as well as nonverbal modes of engaging with the outer world may create very particular semiotic landscapes, while possibly alluding to more specific concepts such as semiotic regimes (van Leeuwen 2005: 53), geosemiotics (Scollon & Wong Scollon 2003) or semiospheres (Lotman 2002/1982). The diverse geographical and social premises of Southeastern Europe, where hegemonic discourses have been both questioned and changing in (recent) history, provide a promising frame for researching the sign and the public space in all their potential interconnection.

Possible topics when contributing to this workshop include (but are not limited to):
– visual cultures of everyday life
– public discourses and memoryscapes
– linguistic landscape studies and graffscapes
– activist encounters in public space
– manifestations of the urban/rural divide
– communist and post-communist public space-making
– socialist vs. capitalist semiotic meaning-making
– ideological accounts and claims of public space

Drawing on a growing number of research initiatives and outcomes on visually tangible discourses in Southeastern Europe, this workshop aims at providing room for exchanging academic, artistic, activist work on semiotic landscapes in Southeastern Europe.

Please send your abstract of up to 500 words to roswitha.kersten-pejanic@uniri.hr and cas@cas.uniri.hr by November 15, 2020. Papers may be in Croatian, English, or German.

We will publish a (peer-reviewed) volume, for which proposals will be welcomed at a later stage. More information on this publication project will be communicated at the beginning of 2021.

There will be compensation for participants for travel expenses and accommodation, whether this will be full or in part reimbursement depends on ongoing fundraising efforts.

“Architectures of Vision” – Call for Papers

The Call for Papers for our 2020 conference, “Architectures of Vision,” is now open!

International Association for Visual Culture’s 6th biennial conference in cooperation with the Department of Cultural Studies, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Rijeka

University of Rijeka, Croatia / September 10 – 12, 2020 / Submissions due May 1, 2020

“[T]he important thing is neither what was said (a content), nor the saying itself (an act), but rather the transformation, and the invention of still unsuspected mechanisms that will allow us to multiply the transformations.” Michel de Certeau, The Practice of Everyday Life

Architecture etymologically belongs to the order of power. Stemming from Greek and Latin, it means “master builder”, derived from archon, chief. Historically, it is understood as building with the vision of the upward, the improved, that is to say an ideal of progress. For its 2020 conference, the International Association for Visual Culture proposes, however, a different formulation of architecture–one of layering, of consciously building from something rather than of scripted building that seeks to level or eliminate the past. What can it mean when we think of architecture as a horizontal network–even a strategy–of different, converging and simultaneous processes?

Our 2020 theme–The Architecture of Vision–unites this lateral, at times instinctive, at times impromptu idea of architecture with a central topic of visual culture–namely vision and visuality. Vision is a central topic of visual culture, a discipline that for a couple of decades now has been trying to (re)imagine the world around us by taking into account the interplay between logos and imago, order and imagination.

Key terms for topics:

  • palimpsestic knowledge
  • propaganda in visual culture (historical and contemporary)
  • origins of change
  • monuments and architecture interventions in public space
  • revolution and counter-revolution: from local case studies to global critical thought subject formation (online/virtual and offline/IRL)
  • building vision: from the visuality of the “subaltern” to surveillance vision
  • visuality in cultural studies and ethnography visual culture, power and control
  • local case studies from Southeast Europe to the Global South: problems and opportunities
  • the subject of decentralized vision: participatory culture, emancipation and the digital
  • archivization / archive as architecture

The topic of this year’s conference seeks to better understand the processes of vision that remake our world as a kind of architectural layering. We seek historical and contemporary topics that respond to these three different strands:

  • First, architecture can be appropriated for the uses of literally “building a vision”, or creating a vision. Here, we are thinking of both the “countervisual” that is imagined and then acted upon–that is to say, made material in an architecture that has both an order and flexibility, which may be applied, reapplied, and grow. We are also thinking of the populist practices of the alt-right and other movements that oppose social or climate justice, whose philosophy and action are built on the production of a worldview based on “alternative facts” and feeling. In other words, how do movements rely on vision as much as infrastructure, i.e. “master building”? In what ways does contemporary visual culture help enable these counter-revolutionary practices, and in what ways can it be used as a weapon of critical thought against them?
  • Therefore, we seek to inspect vision also on a temporal level: as clairvoyance, the process of seeing the future. What is the future of visual culture? How are we to deal with new concepts in the field of cultural studies (from climate crisis to migration or redefinitions of gender, citizenship, and subjectivity on a global scale, to local important struggles specific to a region)? How do we re-articulate those concepts within the frameworks of Visual Culture Studies, including its counter-hegemonic and anti-colonial approach?

Finally, we wish to inspect vision as one of the central themes of visual culture. Vision as a way of seeing, placing the one who looks in the forefront. How is a subject placed in the position of looking? Who is a subject? What is the position of looking today, in a world without a stable vantage point? Can we still insist on the notion of a subject, if the Renaissance position of the stable agent of the look and its object is no longer useful in the digital realm of intersubjective exchange, deep fakes, bots, and algorithms? In other words, how can we reimagine vision as a process of political and cultural emancipation as the world exists today?

We seek proposals for short (20 minute) papers and creative presentations. The IAVC’s conferences work to achieve a balance between thoughtful and attentive listening and animated discussion. Speakers will be prepared for both.

Please submit your 300 to 400 word proposal, a 100 to 200 word biography in a single running Word document or PDF to greetingsIAVC@gmail.com by May 1, 2020. Please title your document in the form of “your surname_abstract_IAVC2020”.

We will announce our conference program in late Spring 2020.

Confirmed guests include: David Ayala-Alfonso (Independent Curators International, USA/Colombia); Manca Bajec (Biennial Foundation, London/New York); Brooke Belisle (Stony Brook University, USA); Irene Chien (Muhlenberg College, USA); Jae Emerling (The University of North Carolina at Charlotte, USA); Jennifer González (University of California Santa Cruz, USA); Natalija Majsova (Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium and University of Ljubljana, Slovenia); Joanne Morra (Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design, University of the Arts London, UK); Rahul Mukherjee (University of Pennsylvania, USA); Krešimir Purgar (Academy of Arts and Culture, J. J. Strossmayer University, Croatia); Irit Rogoff (Goldsmiths, University of London, UK); Marquard Smith (University College London, UK / Vilnius Academy of Arts, Lithuania); Nina Trivedi (Royal College of Art, UK); and Øyvind Vågnes (University of Bergen, Norway).

Call for Papers: Feminist Responses to Populist Politics

Special Issue 25, European Journal of English Studies

Guest editors: Mónica Cano Abadía (University of Graz), Sanja Bojanić (University of Rijeka), Valentina Moro (University of Padova/University of Rijeka)

‘Populism’ is as slippery a term as the political soil it rhizomes in. During the last decade, it has been tested in political reality on numerous occasions and with varying outcomes. The distinction between right and left populisms has also become a staple in everyday academic, policy, and civil society discourses. On the left or the right, populisms often act as a bogeyman, as a threat to politics as usual, and as a sure sign that the world is, yet again, out of joint.

But are these misgivings of any substance? Perhaps the world is actually disjointed. It may be that populisms, left or right, fill in the cracks and fissures that have been lain open for only a short period of time, one that coincides with decades of sustained feminist efforts to change the world for the better. Despite the gains, much of what has been won is now being brought to a halt – and it seems that populisms play their share in this stoppage. It is therefore vital to ask what feminist responses to populisms could be. Can the answer to this question be reduced to the issue of political allegiance, or is it a matter of needing to adjust to new political realities? Would this imply then embracing these realities as well? What is the role that populisms now play in shaping the relationship between radical and mainstream feminisms? If we claim that feminism has always been populist to a certain extent, then we have to have a clear notion of the populus at its core. Alternatively, we might categorically posit that feminist populism is a contradiction in terms and therefore also reject the possibility of left populist feminisms.

This special issue addresses feminist visions of politics as a different answer to populisms’ challenges. We wish to mark ambivalences and name conceptual reasons for why it is insufficiently daring or even reactionary to place feminist emancipatory strategies close to politically divisive contemporary tendencies. Instead, we call for a return to notions of feminist resistance and resilience – notions that put an emphasis on agency, change, and hope in the face of the grave challenges we are faced with around the world. The following topics may be addressed:

  • What does ‘feminist populism’ refer to?
  • To what does feminist resistance to populism refer?
  • How does feminist resilience function?
  • What are the consequences, challenges and possible solutions that feminist resilience can bring about in civil society and institutions?

Detailed proposals (up to 800 words) for full essays (7,500 words), as well as a short biography (max. 100 words) should be sent to all of the editors by 31 December 2019: Mónica Cano Abadía (monica.cano-abadia@uni-graz.at), Sanja Bojanić (sanja.bojanic@uniri.hr), Valentina Moro (valentinamoro8@gmail.com).

Call for Papers: “Rules without Words: Inquiries into Non-linguistic Normativities”

Special Issue of the journal Phenomenology and Mind

Deadline for paper submission: March 27th, 2019
The issue will be published by December 2019

Call for Papers:

In the common thinking, rules are often considered linguistic entities. However, forms of normativity not necessarily connected with verbal or written language emerge in the social reality. A number of normative phenomena (e.g. folk law, customs, pictorial law, graphic rules, hostile architecture, animal societies) widely described in the literature do not seem to involve the use of words. Indeed, apparently, in these cases, rules have non-lexical nature.

Phenomenology and Mind invites submissions for a special issue dedicated to “Rules without Words: Inquiries into Non-linguistic Normativities”. This special issue aims to bring together researchers from all around the world who focus on non-linguistic rules from different philosophical perspectives: social philosophy, philosophy of law and jurisprudence, epistemology, political philosophy, philosophy of language, media studies, philosophy of architecture, philosophy of design, performance studies, ethology, cognitive science and social psychology, gender studies.

The main purpose of this special issue is to provide a critical overview of some of the most

interesting topics and methodologies from the current philosophical debate, focusing on (but not limited to) the following issues:

  1. Ontology of non-linguistic rules
  • What are the distinctive ontological features of non-linguistic rules?
  • What are the relations between non-linguistic rules and social reality?
  • Are non-linguistic rules essentially connected to human societies or do they regulate the social life of some non-human members of the animal kingdom?
  1. Epistemology of non-linguistic rules
  • What are the distinctive epistemic features of non-linguistic rules?
  • What are the cognitive and psychological aspects of non-linguistic rules?
  • How is it possible to understand a non-linguistic rule?
  • Is it possible to have a normative experience independently from language?
  1. Deontology of non-linguistic rules
  • Do non-linguistic rules contribute to the development or the maintenance of traditional and new social inequalities?
  • What are the seminal cases of non-linguistic rules in disseminating or imposing political and social values and habits?
  • How can non-linguistic rules promote the social good?
  • How do architecture and design shape social reality through the creation of tacit normative social constraints?

Phenomenology and Mind is the Journal of the Faculty of Philosophy of San Raffaele University (Milan). It was founded in 2011 and since then has hosted works of outstanding philosophers. The journal is anonymously peer-reviewed and open-access. We are committed to publishing papers of high academic quality and making them accessible to a wide audience. Submissions from underrepresented groups in philosophy are particularly encouraged.

Confirmed Invited Authors:

Amedeo Giovanni Conte (University of Pavia)

Giuseppe Lorini (University of Cagliari)

Patrick Maynard (University of Western Ontario)

Valeria Bucchetti and Francesca Casnati (Politecnico di Milano, Design Department)

Guest Editors:

Sanja Bojanić (University of Rijeka, Academy of Applied Arts Rijeka, Center for Advanced Studies – Southeastern Europe)

Olimpia Loddo (University of Cagliari)

Marko-Luka Zubčić (University of Rijeka, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences Rijeka, Center for Advanced Studies – Southeastern Europe)

Submission Guidelines

Submissions must be prepared for double blind review. Manuscripts – in .doc format – should not contain any identifying information and they cannot exceed 6000 words (references included). Moreover, they must contain:

– An abstract of no more than 150 words,

– The section to which the author(s) wants to contribute to;

– 4/5 keywords.

All manuscripts must be in English.

For stylistic details, see: http://www.fupress.net/public/journals/60/pam_guidelines.pdf;

Submissions should be sent via the Phenomenology and Mind website

(http://www.fupress.net/index.php/pam) by the 27th of March, 2019.

The author should register here and then log in to submit her paper. Please, be sure to register as author in order to submit your paper (flag the option “Author” in your Profile), and to indicate your current affiliation (if applicable).

For information, please contact: phenomenologyandmind@unisr.it

Important dates:

Deadline for submissions: March 27th, 2019 

Notification of acceptance: May 27th, 2019

Publication of the issue: December, 2019


 

Call for papers: Croatian International Relations Review (CIRR)

Special issue on ‘European Union and Challenges of Cultural Policies: Critical Perspectives’

Guest editors: Jaka Primorac, Aleksandra Uzelac and Paško Bilić, Department for Culture and Communication, Institute for Development and International Relations (IRMO), Zagreb, Croatia

Vol. 24 No. 83 (2018)

The Croatian International Relations Review (CIRR) now accepts contributions for its special thematic issue with the provisional title ‘European Union and Challenges of Cultural Policies: Critical Perspectives’ that will focus on the systematic and critical reflections on the impact of the European Union on the national level policies that are framing the cultural field, shedding light on the challenges of implementing cultural policies, as well as, on the challenges of creating and thinking about new cultural policies. CIRR (ISSN 1848-5782) published by the Institute for Development and International Relations, is a peer-reviewed journal in the social sciences that is indexed by Scopus – Elsevier and over 30 other services.

Description and scope

The world in which we live is changing rapidly and hence, local and global levels are no longer easily separated. In the 21st century, cultural policies have to deal with a (post) globalisation context that is marked by cultural, social and economic transformations; issues of rapid technological change and digital shift driven mostly by economic interests, market concentration and the dominance of global corporations; mobility and migration movements; rapid urbanisation; social and financial instability, etc. All this has an impact on the conditions under which the cultural sector operates today.

In the context of EU politics, culture has increasingly been used as an instrument for different social, political or economic objectives. EU international relations are increasingly becoming intercultural, while the concept of culture as public value is weakening in comparison to its commodity value. The crisis in Europe and of the European model has implications for the cultural field as well; today’s Europe needs to reimagine itself – its aims, values and identities – and needs to find an adequate model for its sustainable cultural development. Due to the subsidiarity principle engrained in the Lisbon Treaty, the European Union has not been involved in formulating an explicit common cultural policy. Nevertheless, the EU has been indirectly contributing to the creation of common cultural policy frameworks through its soft cultural policy instruments and mechanisms that represent a de facto policy approach to the various cultural policy issues and their related instruments (e.g. Open Method of Coordination – OMC, the Creative Europe programme, the European Capitals of Culture (ECOC) as the EU cultural programme initiatives and other similar mechanisms). The EU has been also contributing through other explicit policies that affect the field of culture (e.g. through the strategy on the Digital  Single Market (DSM)  and  other  similar  strategies). It is questionable whether  such an approach is still adequate for today’s cultural and social challenges, and whether national level cultural policies can tackle complex global problems, especially in the context where many other public policies are increasingly influencing the field of culture.

The Special Issue on ‘European Union and Challenges of Cultural Policies: Critical Perspectives’ calls for contributions that critically address the different issues and challenges that the EU and national cultural policies are facing in the 21st  century, including, but not limited to:

EU and cultural policy issues: What are the limits of subsidiarity?

What are the impacts of EU soft policy mechanisms on national contexts (OMC, Structured Dialogue, Creative Europe, European Capital of Culture)?

How to contextualise explicit and implicit cultural policies in the context of transversality and convergence of policies?

What is the role of civil society and networks in formulating cultural policies?

Who are the new actors in intersectoral connection (culture, education, science, ICT)

The role of culture in EU international relations – what are the benefits for the cultural sector?

What are the implications of digital shift to sustainable culture of the future?

What is the role of the strategy of the Digital Single Market for sustainable digital cultural resources?

Media and communication policy issues: What is the place of media freedom and media pluralism?

How to tackle socio-cultural inequalities in Europe from the cultural policy perspective?

Innovative cultural policies: what new models are there for achieving sustainability in cultural development?

What new theoretical perspectives on cultural policy can be used?

We welcome articles that develop theoretical arguments or offer strong empirical evidence as either comparative or single-case studies.

Submission and Important dates

We welcome original articles written in English up to 8000 words in length (including footnotes and an abstract of 150 words, and excluding the bibliography). All selected articles are subject to double-blind refereeing by at least two reviewers. Please consult the Instructions for authors before submitting your contributions.

Articles should be sent to cirr@irmo.hr with the subject line stating ‘Article submission for the Special Issue on ‘European Union and Challenges of Cultural Policies: Critical Perspectives’.

Article submission deadline: November 12th, 2017 First round of notifications: February 2nd, 2018 Revised papers due: March 6th, 2018

Further reviews and acceptance: April 17th, 2018 Expected publication date: June, 2018

Please find the full Call for for papers at the following link.

 

Call for papers – John Searle Symposium

19th Edition of the International Conference
Contemporary Philosophical Issues

Place:  University of Rijeka, Croatia

Organizers:  Department of Philosophy, Faculty for Humanities and Social Sciences; Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe, University of Rijeka; Croatian Society for Analytic Philosophy; PhD programme “Contemporaneity and philosophy”, LabOnt, University of Torino; Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade

Date: May 22-23, 2017

Deadline for applications: April 30, 2017

We cordially invite you to the 19th conference Contemporary Philosophical Issues: John Searle Symposium on Social Ontology.

The annual conference is this year dedicated to philosopher John Searle, whose influence on and relevance for the contemporary analytic philosophy, cognitive sciences and neurobiology can hardly be overestimated. Professor Searle’s work in philosophy of language, philosophy of mind, metaphysics and epistemology set foundations for many of the most discussed issues in these fields, and his renditions of problems as diverse as consciousness, intentionality, meaning, free will, artificial intelligence, reality, social reality, human rights, institutions and power, provided new directions for philosophers and scientists alike. In his books, Seeing Things as They Are: A Theory of Perception and Making the Social World: The Structure of Human Civilization, as well as in his work at the recently founded The John Searle Center for Social Ontology, Professor Searle focuses on themes in social sciences, which is why our focus at the conference will be on social ontology. However, we appreciate papers on all and every aspect of John Searle’s rich philosophical oeuvre.

Confirmed participants:

In addition to John Searle, our guests will be Jennifer Hudin, Director of the John Searle Center for Social Ontology, Maurizio Ferraris, LabOnt University of Torino, Tiziana Andina, Director of LabOnt University of Torino, Paolo de Lucia, University of Milano, Giuseppe Lorini, University of Cagliari, Nenad Miščević, University of Maribor, Boran Berčić, University of Rijeka, Snježana Prijić-Samaržija, University of Rijeka, Petar Bojanić, Universities of Belgrade and Rijeka

Abstract submission and deadline:

If you are interested in participating, please send a title of your paper and a short abstract of maximum 400 words by April 30th 2017 to Iris Vidmar (ividmar@ffri.hr) and Andrea Mešanović (andrea.mesanovic@gmail.com). Notifications regarding the acceptance will be issued by May 1st 2017.

Please note that our conference allows for the possibility of presentation of papers concerned with contemporary themes in analytic philosophy that do not address Professor Searle’s opus directly. These presentations will be organized as a parallel session of the conference, which, in case of a large number of applicants, can extend to May 24th. Ideally, we designate 30 minutes for presentations of papers, followed by 15 minutes for discussions.

There will be no registration fee. Conference organizers will provide lunch and light refreshments during the conference program. Participants are kindly requested to make their own accommodation and travel arrangements.

Organizational Committee:

Andrea Mešanović

Iris Vidmar

Luca Malatesti

Gazela Pudar Drasko

Nenad Smokrović

Snježana Prijić-Samaržija

Sanja Bojanić

Vera Tripodi