Nilay Kilinc

Values at Stake – SE Europe: A Normative Marketplace?

The region of Southeast Europe has been expected to progress almost linearly on the European and democratic path, accepting, implementing, and internalizing the democratic and liberal values that the European Union stands for. The EU was founded as the “greatest peace project of all time”. Its steady political and economic progress before the Great Recession of 2008 had attracted neighboring countries, especially those coming from post-communist and post-conflict zones, promising a realistically “utopian” horizon and the promise of a better, normal life.

In these times of obvious crisis for the European model in Southeast Europe, it is our message that a true transfer of European norms and values is possible only with a strong participatory democratic process that allows citizens to exchange opinions and construct shared definitions of the public good. We cannot have this process without creating society engaged in critical public debate where SEE citizens can socialize as active citizens and are treated as equal, responsible, and responsive towards their communities. This is the only path towards living as European citizens, no matter whether we live in the European Union or not. However, the first and the most important struggle in the region is for democracy of active citizens – a condicio sine qua non before we can talk at all about European values and any meaningful future of Southeast Europeans.

 

Featuring contributions by Gazela Pudar Draško, Vedran Džihić, Bojan Baća, Nilay Kilinç, and Senada Šelo Šabić, the most recent study in our “Academia in Dialogue” series investigates the idea of European values and their limits. The authors suggest a new “normative marketplace” is emerging, where the universality of EU norms and values such as democracy, human rights and freedoms, and the rule of law may be at stake. The paper aims to analyze this “new marketplace” and to engage in thinking about possible utopian horizons, which undoubtedly remain relevant beyond the current state of emergency.

[pdf-embedder url=”http://cas.uniri.hr/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/Values-at-stake-pdf.pdf” title=”Values at stake pdf”]

 

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Spring – Autumn 2019 CAS SEE Fellowship Recipients

The Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe (CAS SEE) is pleased to announce the recipients of the Spring – Autumn 2019 CAS SEE Fellowship Awards at the University of Rijeka. The purpose of the CAS SEE Fellowship Programme is to further the research and creative work in the fields of the humanities and humanistic social sciences in the Balkans. Fellows will present their work within the CAS-Collegium, creating an intellectually heterogeneous atmosphere and fostering a productive self-examination or even friction, which may lead to new and unexpected ideas and innovation.

Please join us in congratulating the following CAS SEE Fellowship Awards, University of Rijeka recipients:

Bojan Baca (York University, Canada)

Project – title: “Digitalization of the Marketplace of (Reactionary) Ideas: The Alt-Right as a Political Ideology, Social Movement, and Counter-Culture”

Monica Cano Abadia (University of Zaragoza, Spain)

Project – title: “New Materialist Cartographies of Patterns of Exclusion in Digital Environments”

Guglielmo Feis (University of Milan, Italy)

Project – title: “Channeling Social Justice through the Blockchain? A Critical Review of the Potentiality of Distributed Ledger Technology (DTL) in Reducing Financial Inequalities and Improve the Access to Financial Information”

Ivan Flis (Utrecht University, Netherlands)

Project – title: “Open Science as a Movement of Digital Disruption”

Greta Favara (University of Milan, Italy)

Project – title: “Normative Political Theory and the Public Role of the Theorist”

Natasha Jankovic (University of Belgrade, Serbia)

Project – title:Rijeka: an experimental field of concrete utopia”

Nilay Kilinc (University of Surrey, UK)

Project – title: “Highly-Skilled Turkish Migrants’ Search for Alternative Diaspora Spaces in Europe: How They Build (Digital) Social Networks Beyond the ‘Culture of Rejection’”

Dragana Kovačević Bielicki (University of Oslo, Norway)

Project – title: “Mapping the anti-migrant protests in Serbia, Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina through their online media coverage (2015-present)”

Massimo Leone (University of Fribourg, Switzerland)

Project – title: “Democracy and Trolling in Internet Threads (DETROIT)”

Andrey Menshikov (Ural State University, Russia)

Project – title: “Unequal Distribution of Religious Freedom in the Discourse on Human Rights”

Valentina Moro (University of Padova, Italy)

Project – title: “Deconstructing Languages of Rejection: a Political Theory Analysis of Feminist Discourses and Methodologies”

Sabino Paparella (University of Bari, Italy)

Project – title: “Political Disintermediation in the Digital Era”

Roberto Roccu (LSE, London, UK)

Project – title: “Comparative Political Economies of Lost Hope: Subaltern Trajectories of Inequality, Transformation and Rejection from the Arab Uprisings to Crisis Europe”

Oszkar Roginer (University of Graz, Austria)

Project – title: “Cultures of Rejections – (self)perception of minorities and knowledge production”

Francesca Rolandi (University of Milan, Italy)

Project – title: “Doš’o sam u grad iz pasivnog kraja. Internal Migration, Settlement Dynamics and Social Practices in post-World War II Rijeka”

Snezana Vesnic (University of Belgrade, Serbia)

Project – title: “Positive European Futures: Creating New Concepts for the Transformation and Redefinition of Digital European Values Case study: Rijeka Between Analog and Digital”