Vedran Dzihic

Back to the future – Livable life between nostalgia and utopia

As hundreds of representatives of civil society from Western Balkan countries assembled in Trieste for the Civil Society Forum, CAS co-organized a kick-off event which included the screening of the documentary “Trieste, Yugoslavia” and a lively debate themed “Back to the future – Livable life between nostalgia and utopia”. Introduced by Franz Karl Prueller of the ERSTE Foundation and Branka Panić from the European Fund for the Balkans, the event took place in the Revoltella Museum Gallery of Modern Art. CAS directors, staff, and fellows welcomed the diverse audience, which included civil society representatives from the region, academics and various local actors.

CAS’s choice of the documentary “Trieste, Yugoslavia” by Alessio Bozzer to open the discussions took advantage of the Forum’s special location in a city with an urban history closely intertwined with that of the Western Balkans. The documentary explored the particularly important role of Trieste for many Yugoslav citizens who traveled there during socialist time to buy goods, as the first city across a border which gradually became more open and more porous, rather unique in the overall context of the Cold War. The film pondered upon practices of border crossings and aspirations of shoppers and sellers alike. It touched upon the diverse experiences of people coming from republics close and far, to buy jeans or coffee, by car, train, or packed buses, creative strategies of coping with border regulations, while also mentioning the underlying tensions and discriminatory tones existing the host city regarding the visitors from the nearby country, with their alterity derived from ethnicity-based  stereotypes – with a longer history than the film alludes- and the ideological representations of a Cold War border. Ending abruptly with the scenes of emptied streets and stalls while wars descend upon former Yugoslavia and borders close, the film prompted a debate which shifted from nostalgia to utopia, perceptions from within the former Yugoslavia and the outer region, and musings of perspectives for freedom, equality and solidarity in the region.

 

The debate „Back to the future – Livable life between nostalgia and utopia” was moderated by CAS’s Vedran Džihić and featured special guest, Rade Šerbedžija, CAS SEE Honorary Fellow, Professor Emeritus at the University of Rijeka, who also appeared in the documentary. Vedran Džihić asked the panel, which also included Snježana Prijić-Samaržija, Chancellor, University of Rijeka, Marek Szilvasi, CAS SEE Fellow and Gruia Bădescu, CAS SEE Fellow, to spontaneously reflect on three concepts that relate both to the film and the challenges and opportunities of civil society in the Western Balkans: nostalgia for the past, utopias for the future, and the meaning of freedom in the contemporary context.  The panel participants first approached the film from their positionality: Snježana Prijić-Samaržija and Rade Šerbedžija as citizens of former Yugoslavia for whom both trips to Trieste and the discontinuities of the 1990s triggered memories and emotional reflections,  Marek Szilvasi and Gruia Bădescu as growing up in other socialist societies – Czechoslovakia and Romania, respectively- for which borders were distinctively rigid and for which Yugoslavia, with its open borders and closeness to the West exerted a particular fascination. The two CAS fellows also discussed the tensions that emerge from the film regarding material aspirations and disparities, ideological clashes, as well as in the difference between accounts of celebrated intellectuals and artists, and the anonymized shopper, who becomes a mere “witness” in the account of the film.

These tensions between whose stories, whose narratives, and whose nostalgia were to be discussed emerged throughout the debate. While common tropes of urban versus rural, kulturni and nekulturni ljudi, appeared as explanatory frameworks of 1990s events, Bădescu pointed out from his research in Sarajevo how nostalgias for a cosmopolitan past could also lead to different forms of exclusion of newcomers, burning possible bridges and utopias for what Hanna Arendt called a “world in common”.  Arendt was frequently mentioned by panelists, with Džihić inquiring about freedom from the perspective of both Arendt and material relations. Both Bădescu and Szilvasi addressed the question of freedom from its relationship to human dignity, equality and solidarity. Snježana Prijić-Samaržija brought forward the role of CAS as an institution which embodies the aspiration to research both issues surrounding the past as well as potentialities and utopias at the scale of Southeastern Europe. All throughout, Rade Šerbedžija’s interventions captured the lived experience of the events evoked in the film, nostalgia and exile, sublimated in creative acts, which included two live performances on stage of his songs. They included “Second Call”, which was translated in English and read by CAS Fellow Nataša Sardžoska. His second act, Djevojka iz moga kraja closed the debate, which was followed by a reception and a tour of the exhibit of the Revoltella Museum Gallery of Modern Art. The Civil Society Forum started the following morning, with Trieste again a stage of diverse people and perspectives from the Western Balkans.

 

Civil Society Forum Trieste of the Western Balkans Summit Series

Screening of the documentary “Trieste, Yugoslavia”

Date: Monday, July 10, 2017

Venue: Revoltella Museum Gallery of Modern Art, Via Armando Diaz 27, Trieste


18.00 – 18.30 | Welcome speech

Franz Karl Prueller, ERSTE Foundation

Branka Panic, European Fund for the Balkans

18.30 – 20.30 | Screening of the documentary movie: “Trieste, Yugoslavia”

Discussion: „Back to the future – Livable life between nostalgia and utopia“; organized in cooperation with Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe (CAS SEE), University of Rijeka

Special guest: Rade Serbedzija, CAS SEE Honorary Fellow, Professor Emeritus at the University of Rijeka

Speakers:

Snjezana Prijic-Samarzija, Chancellor, University of Rijeka

Gruia Bădescu, CAS SEE Fellow, University of Rijeka

Marek Szilvasi, CAS SEE Fellow, University of Rijeka

Mateja Kurir, CAS SEE Fellow, University of Rijeka

Gregor Moder, CAS SEE Fellow, University of Rijeka

Marija Ott Franolic, CAS SEE Fellow, University of Rijeka

Natasha Sardzoska, CAS SEE Fellow, University of Rijeka

Moderator:

Vedran Dzihic, Austrian Institute for International Affairs, Vienna; CAS SEE, University of Rijeka


20.30 – 21.30 | Dinner Reception at the Revoltella Museum Gallery of Modern Art

Aktionstage: Refugees – Migration – Democracy

The first panel of the Aktionstage: Refugees – Migration – Democracy Symposium held at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna, entitled (Not) Learning from history, part I: Yugoslav refugee crisis – how Europe dealt with it from left to right, moderated by Vedran Džihić (CAS SEE, University of Rijeka, oiip, Vienna) included the presentations of Zoran Slavinić (REMESO, Linköping University), Branka Likić-­Brborić (REMESO, Linköping University) and Melita H. Sunjic (UNHCR, Vienna) that engaged both listeners and speakers in debates on the changing nature of European democracy in the midst of the ongoing refugee crisis.

The second panel, (Not) Learning from history, part II: Integration and democracy from left to right, moderated by Sanja Bojanić (CAS SEE, University of Rijeka) delt with the nature of the contemporary demos. The panel provided experts from various disciplines: Ilker Ataç (University of Vienna), Gudrun Biffl (Danube University Krems), Holly Case (IWM, Brown University) and Li Bennich-­Björkman (Department of Government, Uppsala University) with the opportunity to offer sensible and culturally diverse outlooks on political participation, contribution and agency. Their explorations of the topics of political optimism, institutional control and emotional engagement provided a fascinating basis for further discussions about the proper response to the refugee crisis.

The third panel, Demos – Who belongs to the political community? moderated by Gerd Valchars (Initiative Minderheiten, Vienna) included presentations of Hedvig Morvai (European Fund for the Balkans, Belgrade), Katharine Sarikakis (University of Vienna) and Snježana Prijić-­Samaržija (CAS SEE, University of Rijeka).

Snjezana Prijic-Samarzija

At the conference, the co-director of the Center for Advanced Studies SEE, professor Snježana Prijić-Samaržija presented her answer to the problem of belonging to a political community. Prijić-Samaržija’s presentation approached the issue of migration from an institutional perspective, questioning the legitimacy of someone’s right to impose limits on the freedom of movement. Throughout the speech, she explored the legitimacy of unilateral prohibitive decisions made by particular states and the implications of their unsustainable one-dimensionality, juxtaposing them with the notion of migration as a basic human right. Should we choose to view the right to seek better political and economic conditions as a manifestation of contemporary social mobility, we would need to address the option that nobody can legitimately limit the movement of others. Striving to reach a balanced conclusion, Prijić-Samaržija proposed delegating the issue of migrations to international institutions capable of adjusting the subjective interests of particular states to the interests of migrants. Relating to the broader topic of the conference, she emphasized the necessary hierarchy of urgency between the migration of genuine refugees, low-skilled workers escaping poverty and high-skilled experts seeking better payment. Her presentation incited many responses from the audience, leading to a discussion about the nature of credible international institutions and the danger of excessive euro centrism.

What is Left in Diversity and what is Diverse in Left?

The panel discussion: “What is Left in Diversity and what is Diverse in Left?” was the last event of the CAS SEE “Rethinking Politics of Diversity” Rijeka summer school and was held at the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences (University of Rijeka) on Friday, September 16th, 2016.

The discussion was led by Felix Henkel (FES Regional Office, Sarajevo), Athena Athanasiou (Panteion University of Social and Political Sciences, Athens) , Adriana Zaharijevic (IFDT), Vuk Prica (Chair of the Youth Council, SDP, Primorje – Gorski Kotar County), Vedran Dzihic (CAS SEE) and moderated by Sanja Bojanic (CAS SEE).

CAS SEE Summer school Programme

RETHINKING POLITICS OF DIVERSITY

RIJEKA UNIVERSITY CAMPUS, FACULTY FOR THE HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES, Sveučilišna avenija 2, IV Floor; Room 401, Rijeka
September 12th – September 16th 2016

Organized by:

Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe, University of Rijeka

In cooperation with:

Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade

Friedrich Ebert Stiftung – Zagreb

University Paris 8, Vincennes-St Denis

Center for Women’s Studies, University of Rijeka

This summer school should provide space for recasting frameworks of “diversity politics” and “diversity discourses” in Europe. In light of recent events, we would like to challenge the crisis of multiculturalism and core European values of solidarity and human rights. The “failure of multiculturalism” narrative has become all too present in Europe, shifting the rhetoric to cultural anxieties and articulating immigration as a national threat. This discourse has also affected “internal immigration”, making certain groups throughout Europe less visible and more vulnerable: Roma, refugees and internally displaced persons, certain LGBTQ communities. Moreover, ethnicity, nationality, religion and race are being forcefully reshuffled, inviting contemporary forces of nationalism and securitization. Hereby, we are particularly interested to the effects of the ways how European countries ‘manage’ diversity through its policies and practices: from ethnic and racial to socio-economic diversity, but also particularly to citizenship and migration status diversity. It is of crucial interest to map and evidence differences among significantly varying Western European practices (France, UK, Germany etc.), Central European practices (former communist countries with strong opposition to multiculturalism) and South-Eastern European practices in countries where migration is observed as passing-by phenomenon.

The lectures and seminars of this summer school particularly investigate how these three identified regions policies connected to governmentality of diversity are changing after the recent and actual conflicts and migration flows. The summer school will particularly focus on policies and practices that affect marginalized and vulnerable groups in these regions.

The summer school’s main goal is to highlight the agency of these marginalized groups in order to understand, how they themselves respond to the reconfigurations of diversity politics and practices.

TIMETABLE
Monday, Sept 12, 2016

Time

Activity Lecturers

Abstract and/or suggested readings

10.30

11.30

Arrival and Registration
11.30

12.00

Opening session:

 

Introduction

Julija Sardelic, Gazela Pudar Drasko, Sanja Bojanic, Brigita Milos, Adriana Zaharijevic
12.00

12.30

Coffee break
12.30

14.00

Lecture and Debate:

 

Refugee Crises, the Question of Multiculturalism and Position of Marginalized Minorities

Julija Sardelic

 

School of Law and Social Justice, University of Liverpool

–         Biljana Đorđević (2015) Whose Rights, Whose Return? The Boundary Problem and Unequal Restoration of Citizenship in the Post-Yugoslav Space, Ethnopolitics, 14:2, 121-139, DOI: 10.1080/17449057.2014.991150

–         Giuseppe Forino (2016) From Gevgelija to Budapest: The bare life in transit camps of the Balkans and Eastern Europe, Transnational Social Review, 6:1-2, 180-186, DOI: 10.1080/21931674.2016.1186420

–         Viktor Koska (2015) Refugee Integration and Citizenship Policies: The Case Study of Croatian Serbs in Vojvodina, Ethnopolitics, 14:2, 180-196, DOI: 10.1080/17449057.2014.991155

–         Gëzim Krasniqi (2015) Equal Citizens, Uneven Communities: Differentiated and Hierarchical Citizenship in Kosovo, Ethnopolitics, 14:2, 197-217, DOI: 10.1080/17449057.2014.991152

–         Julija Sardelić (2015) Romani Minorities and Uneven Citizenship Access in the Post-Yugoslav Space, Ethnopolitics, 14:2, 159-179, DOI: 10.1080/17449057.2014.991154

14.00

15.30

Lunch Break
15.30

16.30

Presentation of the project and Debate:

 

Global Migration Governance: Will 2016 be the decisive year?

 

Caroline Schultz

 

Expert Council of German Foundations on Integration and Migration, Berlin

Migration management remains one of the last bastions of national sovereignty. As a result, most countries traditionally tend to be more cautious when setting international standards related to migration. Global migration governance therefore resembles a fragmented tapestry. Since the turn of the millennium, however, there has been considerable movement in the international fabric of norms and rules on migration: migration plays a role in many areas of the UN system, outside of the UN as well, migration issues are increasingly discussed on the international stage. Germany is also more and more involved in global migration policy, and not just since the sharp rise in refugee arrivals over the last two years. For example, in 2017/2018 Germany, together with Morocco, will chair the Global Forum on Migration and Development (GFMD). The presentation will provide a critical overview of global migration governance, taking into account the most recent developments leading up to the September 19th UN high-level meeting to address large movements of refugees and migrants and sketch out what lays ahead in this field.
16.30

17.00

Concluding remarks for the day
17.00

17.30

Photo exhibition opening (Faculty for the Humanities and Social Sciences, Main Hall):

 

Out of Sight: Poverty, Rurality, Gender

Jelena Ćeriman, CELAP

Miloš Kosovac, CELAP

Kristina Smoljanović, CAS SEE

The exhibition “Out of Sight: Poverty, Rurality, Gender” deals with gender and social disparities in rural areas and focuses on specific areas of social politics. The intersection of exclusion, poverty and gender means that the slightest social tremor plunges those living in poverty and isolation into isolation and neglect. We innovated the way in which we communicate research results by including representatives of the group itself into the creative part of work and allowing them to demonstrate their capacity of perceiving inequalities, barriers and obstacles they meet in everyday life. They achieve this through making photos. Using a camera, girls, young women and women from rural areas complemented our results and ethnographic materials made by our researchers, by giving a human face to poverty and social exclusion.
 Tuesday, Sept 13, 2016
Time Activity Lecturers

Text

10.00

11.30

Lecture and Debate:

 

Modern citizenship struggles and the (impossible) choice between cultural recognition and socioeconomic justice in Southeastern Europe

Gezim Krasniqi

 

School of Slavonic and East European Studies, University College London

–      Andreas Wimmer, Nationalist Exclusion Ethnic Conflict: Shadows of Modernity (Cambridge University Press), 2002.

–      Rogers Brubaker, Grounds for Difference. Harvard University Press, 2015. Chapter 1.

–      Nancy Fraser, From Redistribution To Recognition? Dilemmas Of Justice In A ‘Post-Socialist’ Age, New Left Review, I/212, July-August 1995

–      https://newleftreview.org/II/3/nancy-fraser-rethinking-recognition

–      Nina Bandelj and Mathew C Bahutga, How Socio-Economic Change Shapes Income Inequality in Post-Socialist Europe, Social Factors (2010), 88:5

11.30

12.00

Coffee break
12.00

13.30

Lecture and Debate:

 

Multilingualism in European Literature and Cultural Diversity

Jörg Schulte

 

Institute of Slavonic Studies, University of Cologne

–         Mehrsprachigkeit in Zentraleuropa: Zur Geschichte einer literarischen und kulturellen Chance. Hrsg. v. András F. Balogh. Wien 2012.

–         Nabokov, Vladimir/Boyd, Brian: Verses and Versions: Three Centuries of Russian Poetry. Orlando 2008.

–         Niger, Samuel: Bilingualism in the History of Jewish Literature. Lanham 1990.

–         Radaelli, Giulia: Literarische Mehrsprachigkeit: Sprachwechsel bei Elias Canetti und Ingeborg Bachmann. Berlin 2011.

–         Weissbort, Daniel: Translation: Theory and Practice. A Historical Reader. Oxford 2006.

13.30

15.00

Lunch Break
15.00

16.30

Presentation of the Project and Debate:

 

Accepting the Difference: Feminist Theory in the class and Feminist Press in Serbia in the 1990s and 2000s

Biljana Dojcinovic and Ana Kolaric

 

Faculty of Philology, University of Belgrade

–     Biljana Dojčinović  (2006). “De-centerd Pluralism of Methods: Feminist Literary Criticism in Serbia” u GendeRingS, Gendered Readings in Serbian Women’s Writing, Indok centar 2006. (pdf knjige u prilogu, prvi tekst u knjizi)

–     Dojčinović B., Koch, M. (2011) “In Search of Women Authors”, an Interview with Suzan van Dijk, http://www.knjizenstvo.rs/magazine.php?text=25.

–     Afterword: We Other Periodicalists, or, Why Periodical Studies?, Manushag N. Powell, Tulsa Studies in Women’s Literature, Volume 30, Number 2, Fall 2011, pp. 441-450

–     Ana Kolarić “Rane kritike Rebeke Vest” http://www.knjizenstvo.rs/magazine.php?text=132

16.30

17.00

Concluding remarks for the day
 Wednesday, Sept 14, 2016
Time Activity Lecturers

Text

10.00

11.30

Lecture and Debate:

 

Europe and its Others: The Figure of the Migrant in the Construction of the European Union

Céline Cantat

 

Central European University, Budapest

–      Balibar, Etienne, 2003, We, the People of Europe? Reflections on Transnational Citizenship (Princeton University Press)

–      Delanty, Gerard, 1995, Inventing Europe: Idea, Identity, Reality  (Macmillan).

–      Fekete, Liz, 2001, “The Emergence of Xeno-Racism,” Race & Class, Vol. 43, no. 2.

11.30

12.00

Coffee break
12.00

13.30

Lecture and Debate:

 

The Road Not Taken. Neoliberalism, Xenophobia, and Terrorism

Eric Fassin

 

University Paris 8, Vincennes-St Denis

–       Eric Fassin, “National Identities and Transnational intimacies: sexual democracy and the politics of immigration in Europe”, Public Culture, 22:3, Duke University Press. http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/historypresent.1.2.0265?origin=JSTOR-pdf&seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents

–       Roms, une politique de la race https://vimeo.com/131783052

–       Eric Fassin, “Criticism to Critique”, History of the Present, Vol. 1, No. 2 (Fall 2011), pp. 265-274.

13.30

15.00

Lunch
17.30

19.00

Round Table, City Hall, Rijeka

 

Hosted by the Mayor of Rijeka, M Vojko Obersnel

Crossing Roads: Civil Society and Academia

 (Speaking in Croatian)

The question of representing the reality of society is fundamental and is now threatened by the triumph of simplified visions of society, visions of the other who does not correspond to reality. We couldn’t make democracy if we stayed in terrible ignorance of each other. Participating in this very same reality also demands a willingness to recognize that the democracy is intermittent and thoughtless, that it needs knowledge. Academia and civil society meet on crossroads of action and thinking. Both realms of common reality should think and study their actions and act in their research and studies.

Doris Kramaric / PaRiter, Rijeka

Lorena Zec / SOS Rijeka – centre for nonviolence and human rights

Vedran Obucina / Institute for European and Globalisation Studies

Nebojša Zelic / Faculty for Philosophy and Social Sciences, University of Rijeka

Bojana Culum / Faculty for Philosophy and Social Sciences, University of Rijeka  (TBC)

Moderator: Danko Zitinic / University of Rijeka

19.00

20.30

Reception at the Cukarikafe Bar (Trg Jurja Klovica 4, 51000, Rijeka)
 Thursday, Sept 15, 2016

Time

Activity Lecturers

Text

10.00

11.00

Presentation of the project:

 

When the Rooftops Became red Again: Post War Community Dynamics in Bosnia and Herzegovina

Marika Djolai

 

CAS SEE Fellow, University of Rijeka, Institute for Development Studies, Brighton

–      George Hillery (1982), Research odyssey: developing and testing a community theory. New Brunswick. Transaction Books.

–      Roger Brubaker (2014), Ethnicity without groups. Cambridge, Mass; London: Harvard University Press.

11.00

11.30

Coffee break
11.30

12.30

Presentation of the project:

Topic area: Freedom of Expression and Hate Speech in Today’s Diversified Europe: Was that Supposed to Be Funny?

Stand-Up Satire and ‘Political Correctness’

Edward Djordjevic and Jelena Ceriman

 

Center for Ethics, Law and Applied Philosophy, Belgrade

–         Fairclough, Norman. ‘Political Correctness’: Politics of Culture and Language. Discourse and Society 14(1):17-28, 2003.

–         Raul, Perez. Learning to make racism funny in the ‘color-blind’ era: Stand-up comedy students, performance strategies, and the (re)production of racist jokes in public. Discourse and Society 24: 478-503, 2013.

–         Borns, Betsy. Comic Lives: Inside the World of Stand-Up Comedy. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1987.

–         Butler, Judith. Excitable Speech: A Politics of the Performative. New York: Routledge, 1997.

12.30

13.30

Presentation of the campaign and debate:

NO hate speech movement: lessons to be learnt

Gazela Pudar Drasko

 

Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, Belgrade

 

Member of the National Committee for Implementing Campaign for Combating Hate Speech Online of Republic Serbia

–         BOOKMARKS: a manual for combating hate speech online through human rights education
13.30

15.00

Lunch Break
15.00

16.30

Lecture and Debate:

 

Rethinking Inequality: Affect, knowledge, and politics of difference

 

Marjo Kolehmainen

 

Visiting fellow, GEXcel International Collegium for Advanced Transdisciplinary Gender Studies, Linköping university, Sweden,

Postdoc, School of Social Sciences and Humanities, University of Tampere, Finland

–      Ahmed, Sara (2004): Affective Economics. Social Text 79, 22(2), pp. 117-139

–      Hemmings, Clare (2012): Affective solidarity: Feminist reflexivity and political transformation. Feminist Theory 13(2), pp. 147-161

16.30

17.00

Concluding remarks of the day:

 

All lives matter: whose life is livable?

 

Is it enough to speak up? About affective inequalities and other misunderstandings

 

 

Adriana Zaharijevic

 

 

Sanja Bojanic, Brigita Milos

IFDT, University of Belgrade, CAS SEE, Center for Women’s Studies

University of Rijeka

 Friday, Sept 15, 2016

Time

Activity Lecturers

Text

10.00

11.30

Lecture and Debate:

 

The “icy waters” of Europe and agonistic politics

Athena Athanasiou

 

Panteion University of Social and Political Sciences, Athens

–         Judith Butler, Notes Toward a Performative Theory of Assembly. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2015.

–         Chantal Mouffe, Agonistics: Thinking the World Politically. London: Verso 2013.

11.30

12.00

Coffee break
12.00

13.30

Lecture and Debate:

 

Nomadism and belonging in feminist postcolonial art

Elena Tzelepis, Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities, University of London

–         Braidotti, Rosi, 2011, Nomadic Subjects: Embodiment and Sexual Difference in Contemporary Feminist Theory, New York: Columba UP, Second Edition.

–         Butler Judith and Athena Athanasiou, 2013, Dispossession: The Performative in the Political, Cambridge: Polity Press.

13.30

15.00

Lunch Break
15.00

17.00

Panel Discussion:

 

What is Left in Diversity and what is Diverse in Left?

Opening remarks: Max Brändle (FES Zagreb)

 

Felix Henkel (FES Regional Office, Sarajevo), Athena Athanasiou (Panteion University of Social and Political Sciences, Athens), Adriana Zaharijevic (IFDT), Vuk Prica, (Chair of the Youth Council, Primorje – Gorski Kotar County), Nebojsa Zelic (Faculty for Philosophy and Social Sciences, University of Rijeka), Vedran Dzihic (CAS SEE), Sanja Bojanic (CAS SEE)

CAS SEE University of Rijeka will prepare official CAS SEE certificates with detailed overview of the summer school program and students’ requirements (sufficient for 3 ECTS). The recognition of the ECTS depends solely on the institutions students are coming from. Summer School Program committee will sign the certificates at the end of the course.

Programme Board of the summer school:

Sanja Bojanic, CAS SEE/CWS, University of Rijeka

Eric Fassin, University Paris 8

Brigita Miloš, Center for Women Studies (CWS), University of Rijeka

Adriana Zaharijevic, IFDT, University of Belgrade

Violetta Zentai, CEU, Budapest

Petar Bojanic, CAS SEE, University of Rijeka / IFDT, University of Belgrade

Organization Board:

Gazela Pudar Drasko, IFDT, University of Belgrade (gazela.pudar@instifdt.bg.ac.rs)

Andrea Mešanovic, University of Rijeka (andrea.mesanovic@gmail.com)

Kristina Smoljanovic, University of Rijeka (ksmoljanovic@gmail.com)

Social Justice in the Regional Perspective: Inequalities in the Western Balkans

Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory organised the Round table ‘Social Justice in the Regional Perspective: Inequalities in the Western Balkans’ as a part of the International Conference ‘Social Justice: New Perspectives, New Horizons’. It aimed to provide the space for discussion on the current trends and socio-political process that contribute to increasing social inequalities in the region. Participants provided their personal perspectives on the different aspects of social inequality and discussed the challenges of social policies and desirable changes in the relation to/opposed to EU integration pathways.

Participants:
Vedran Džihić, Director of CAS SEE and Senior Researcher of the Institute for Political Studies, University in Vienna
Slobodan Cvejić, Faculty of Philosophy, University of Belgrade
Mihail Arandarenko, Faculty of Economics, University of Belgrade
Ivan Sekulović, Social Inclusion and Poverty Reduction Unit, Government of the Republic of Serbia
Mirna Jusić, Social Research Center Analitika, Bosnia and Herzegovina
Gezim Krasniqi, School of Slavonic and East European Studies, University College London