University of Rijeka

Rijeka Industrial Heritage – Education for Tourist Guides

University of Rijeka, Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe and Center for Industrial Heritage organized an education for tourist guides, which took place on November 28 -29, 2018 in RiHub, a newly opened creative hub in the center of Rijeka.

University of Rijeka is working alongside the City of Rijeka and Rijeka Tourist Board in a program and infrastructure development project “Touristic Valorisation of Representative Monuments of Rijeka’s Industrial Heritage”, focusing on the renovation of the Sugar Refinery Palace in the Benčić complex and the Galeb ship – two objects to be renovated and opened in Rijeka, managed by the City Museum of Rijeka in 2020. The project includes various education and research activities and the creation of the industrial and marine route, connecting diverse cultural and historic city locations.

The education focused on introducing the tourist guides with the future Route of Industrial and Marine Heritage, the objects currently in the process of renovation and the themes connected with the industrial heritage of Rijeka in the aim of developing a unique cultural-touristic product which will distinguish and enrich Rijeka touristic offer and contribute further developments on the local and regional level. This year’s education for tourist guides is the first of the following educations, to be continued in 2019 and 2020.

The first day of the program included a guided tour of the future Route elaborated within the Project, and the expert guidance was provided by Ivana Golob Mihić (UNIRI CIB) and Velid Đekić (City Museum of Rijeka). The second day of the program continued with the presentations and lectures by Ivan Šarar (Head of the City of Rijeka Culture Department) and Dominik Damiš (Rijeka Tourist Board) who provided attendants with the current project developments and the future plans and innovations of the Rijeka Tourist Board.

Associate Professor Zrinka Zadel (UNIRI FMTU) gave a lecture entitled Industrial Heritage – From a Resource to a Touristic Product, an inspiring showcase of the relevant European and global examples of the usage of industrial heritage in tourism.

Kristina Pandža (UNIRI CIB) presented the activities and plans of the Univeristy of Rijeka Centers and proposed further collaboration with the tourist guides in the field of education on Rijeka cultural and industrial heritage. The director of the City Museum of Rijeka, M.Sc. Ervin Dubrović held a lecture on the history of Rijeka commerce organization and the Sugar Refinery Palace, closing the two-day program of the education.


The education of tourist guides is a part of the program activities of the University of Rijeka, partner in execution of the “Touristic Valorisation of Representative Monuments of Rijeka’s Industrial Heritage” project, funded by the European Regional Development Fund – Operational Program “Competitiveness and Cohesion”. Once renovated, in 2020 the Baroque Palace and the Galeb ship will be managed by the City Museum of Rijeka. The project is managed by the City of Rijeka in partnership with the Rijeka Tourist Board and the University of Rijeka – Center for Industrial Heritage and the Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe.

Call for Papers: “Rules without Words: Inquiries into Non-linguistic Normativities”

Special Issue of the journal Phenomenology and Mind

Deadline for paper submission: March 13th, 2019
The issue will be published by December 2019

Call for Papers:

In the common thinking, rules are often considered linguistic entities. However, forms of normativity not necessarily connected with verbal or written language emerge in the social reality. A number of normative phenomena (e.g. folk law, customs, pictorial law, graphic rules, hostile architecture, animal societies) widely described in the literature do not seem to involve the use of words. Indeed, apparently, in these cases, rules have non-lexical nature.

Phenomenology and Mind invites submissions for a special issue dedicated to “Rules without Words: Inquiries into Non-linguistic Normativities”. This special issue aims to bring together researchers from all around the world who focus on non-linguistic rules from different philosophical perspectives: social philosophy, philosophy of law and jurisprudence, epistemology, political philosophy, philosophy of language, media studies, philosophy of architecture, philosophy of design, performance studies, ethology, cognitive science and social psychology, gender studies.

The main purpose of this special issue is to provide a critical overview of some of the most

interesting topics and methodologies from the current philosophical debate, focusing on (but not limited to) the following issues:

  1. Ontology of non-linguistic rules
  • What are the distinctive ontological features of non-linguistic rules?
  • What are the relations between non-linguistic rules and social reality?
  • Are non-linguistic rules essentially connected to human societies or do they regulate the social life of some non-human members of the animal kingdom?
  1. Epistemology of non-linguistic rules
  • What are the distinctive epistemic features of non-linguistic rules?
  • What are the cognitive and psychological aspects of non-linguistic rules?
  • How is it possible to understand a non-linguistic rule?
  • Is it possible to have a normative experience independently from language?
  1. Deontology of non-linguistic rules
  • Do non-linguistic rules contribute to the development or the maintenance of traditional and new social inequalities?
  • What are the seminal cases of non-linguistic rules in disseminating or imposing political and social values and habits?
  • How can non-linguistic rules promote the social good?
  • How do architecture and design shape social reality through the creation of tacit normative social constraints?

Phenomenology and Mind is the Journal of the Faculty of Philosophy of San Raffaele University (Milan). It was founded in 2011 and since then has hosted works of outstanding philosophers such as Lynne Baker, Thomas Fuchs, Anna Elisabetta Galeotti, Shaun Gallagher, Margaret Gilbert, Jürgen Habermas, Edward Harcourt, Robin Jeshion, Dieter Lohmar, Michael Pauen, John Searle, Nadia Urbinati, and many others. The journal is anonymously peer-reviewed and open-access. We are committed to publishing papers of high academic quality and making them accessible to a wide audience. Submissions from underrepresented groups in philosophy are particularly encouraged.

Confirmed Invited Authors:

Amedeo Giovanni Conte (University of Pavia)

Giuseppe Lorini (University of Cagliari)

Patrick Maynard (University of Western Ontario)

Valeria Bucchetti and Francesca Casnati (Politecnico di Milano, Design Department)

Guest Editors:

Sanja Bojanić (University of Rijeka, Academy of Applied Arts Rijeka, Center for Advanced Studies – Southeastern Europe)

Olimpia Loddo (University of Cagliari)

Marko-Luka Zubčić (University of Rijeka, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences Rijeka, Center for Advanced Studies – Southeastern Europe)

Submission Guidelines

Submissions must be prepared for double blind review. Manuscripts – in .doc format – should not contain any identifying information and they cannot exceed 6000 words (references included). Moreover, they must contain:

– An abstract of no more than 150 words,

– The section to which the author(s) wants to contribute to;

– 4/5 keywords.

All manuscripts must be in English.

For stylistic details, see: http://www.fupress.net/public/journals/60/pam_guidelines.pdf;

Submissions should be sent via the Phenomenology and Mind website

(http://www.fupress.net/index.php/pam) by the 13th of March, 2019.

The author should register here and then log in to submit her paper. Please, be sure to register as author in order to submit your paper (flag the option “Author” in your Profile), and to indicate your current affiliation (if applicable).

For information, please contact: phenomenologyandmind@unisr.it

Important dates:

Deadline for submissions: March 13th, 2019 

Notification of acceptance: May 13th, 2019

Publication of the issue: December, 2019

Closing of the Summer school of Innovative interpretation of industrial heritage

The press conference and the official closing of the Summer School of Innovative Interpretation of Industrial Heritage program was held on Friday, September 28th, at the Delta Lab in Rijeka. The Summer school is a part of the “Touristic Valorisation of Representative Monuments of Rijeka’s Industrial Heritage” program, and on this subject, the program was presented by Prof. Snježana Prijić Samaržija, Rector of the University of Rijeka, Mr Ivan Šarar, Head of the Department of Culture and the project leader of “Touristic Valorisation of Representative Monuments of Rijeka’s Industrial Heritage”, Dr. Bert Ludwig, director of European Heritage Volunteers and Marina Batinić, co-founder of Culture Hub Croatia, alongside of Kristina Pandža, Project and Research Coordinator at the University of Rijeka – the education and research component and one of the partners in project implementation.

The University Rector, Prof. Snježana Prijić Samaržija stated that it takes courage and motivation to come to a foreign city and to try to interpret its industrial and cultural heritage, and that the whole concept of the summer school is innovative in itself so that the product remaining as its legacy, the proposals of student’s interpretation of Rijeka’s (industrial) heritage is equally innovative as is the way it has come to being.

Mr Ivan Šarar pointed out that sometimes the current social climate and the “tones” of daily political polemics can go far from any congruous interpretations of the heritage that is the subject of this debate. It’s really about two allegoric and symbolically charged represents of the city. These two objects are and continue to remain open platforms for diverse interpretations, so these (student’s) inputs remain equally important in a reality that never ceases to interpret its history.

Dr Bert Ludwig presented the work and activities of European Heritage Volunteers organization with different participatory projects open to the public, such as European Heritage Volunteers Projects, European Heritage Training Projects, World Heritage UNESCO Projects, EHV Partner Projects.

Marina Batinić, co-founder of Culture Hub Croatia reflected on the importance of the experiences accumulated abroad with exchange being one of the most valuable resources of the volunteers which indeed reflects on the local context, but also manages to shape broader, international co-operations and projects. At the end, she concluded that history is valuable in itself – it cannot and doesn’t have to be forgotten but giving chance to the young experts to provide some possible future perspectives and a positive relationship with the heritage is really what is most important.

After a brief discussion on the Project goals and the relevance of heritage interpretation, the student – volunteers from Croatia, Italy, Hungary, Chile, Germany, Russia, Taiwan and China took the stage to present the innovative heritage interpretation proposals, focusing on the “Galeb” ship and the Sugar Refinery administrative building in Rijeka.

During the past two weeks of intense workshops and discussions in Rijeka, the final report „Between Past, Present and Future – Interpreting the Industrial Heritage of Rijeka” with more than thirty proposals was produced as a result and the legacy of the volunteers joint work and can be downloaded here, as well as on the Center for Industrial Heritage and Culture Hub Croatia websites.

Summer School of Innovative Interpretation of Industrial Heritage

Summer School of Innovative Interpretation of Industrial Heritage, organized by Center for Industrial Heritage and Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe of University of Rijeka in cooperation with Culture Hub Croatia and European Heritage Volunteers, started on Monday, 17th of September with the volunteers’ visit to the City of Rijeka, where they were welcomed by Deputy Mayor Marko Filipović, Ivan Šarar, Head of the Department of Culture at the City of Rijeka and Ms Helga Večerinović, expert associate for product development at the City of Rijeka Turist Board.

During the two weeks long Summer School, the students from Croatia, China, Russia, Chile, Hungary, Germany, Italy and Taiwan investigated and researched the possibilities of the innovative interpretation of the school ship „Galeb“ and the Sugar Refinery, two representative objects of Rijeka’s industrial heritage, which are currently in the process of renovation. The mentioned reception at the City of Rijeka was also an opportunity for a short presentation of the project “Touristic Valorisation of Representative Monuments of Rijeka’s Industrial Heritage”, funded by the European Regional Development Fund – Operational Program “Competitiveness and Cohesion”. The Croatia’s Ministry of Regional Development and the EU funds provided substantial amount of 68.891.606,18 kuna for the project’s development, with the total worth of the project of 81.339.442,05 kuna.

On Tuesday, 18th of September, Summer School program continued in Delta Lab, with a Conference on the Interpretation of Industrial Heritage, with experts from the field of cultural and industrial heritage valorisation and interpretation, including doc. dr. sc. Darko Babić (University of Zagreb, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Department of Information and Communication Sciences) co-founder of the “Interpret Croatia” Association, who provided a remarkable and detailed overview of the interpretation theory, focusing on the need of creating an emotional link between the audiences and the (information regarding) the heritage, and focusing on interpretation as a creative informal education and, moreover, the importance of understanding that heritage comes into being by being interpreted. He concluded that the ideal situation is that in which the local communities recognize their heritage and know what they want to gain from it and then seek the experts to tell its story.

The program continued with lectures and workshop with the „Muses“: Dragana Lucija Ratković Aydemir and Ivana Jagic Boljat who emphasized the importance of good communication and openness in working with the clients and the users of the interpretation, and the pronounced relevance of understanding the needs of the local communities from the very start of interpretation process. The afternoon session continued with lectures and presentations of best practice examples with Jelena Mateševac (Primorje-Gorski Kotar County) presenting the project Cultural-tourist Route “the Routes of the Frankopans”, followed by mr. sc. Vlatko Čakširan (City Museum Sisak) presenting the „Info center of Industrial Heritage – Holland House“. Best practice example with regards to EU projects aimed at promoting co-operation between central European cities, and providing other cities, though their associations, with recommendations on how to improve hidden cultural heritage potentials were presented by Sonja Lukin and Tanja Pavlovic – Flegar (City of Rijeka), with the „Forget Heritage“ project, followed by Luka Rodela (Molekula Association) presenting the re-use center pilot within the same project, providing us with a short „beginners guide“ to heritage management in the context of forlorn industrial factories of Rijeka.

On Wednesday, September 19th, the most important current Rijeka project, Rijeka 2020 – European Capital of Culture was presented by Dorian Celcer, Partnership and Protocol Coordinator at the Rijeka2020 d.o.o.  He provided a showcase of the initial idea, application process, current developments and the seven flagships overview with the goals and legacy of the project, expected after 2020.

On Thursday, the volunteers were greeted by the University of Rijeka representatives, Prof. Sanja Baric, Vice Rector for Studies and Students, and Associate Professor Bojana Ćulum, Department of Education at the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, giving an overview of the University’s policies and strategies aimed at developing and fostering student activism and volunteering. The volunteers also met with the representatives of the Student Council at the University of Rijeka: Margime Hasani, Tea Dimnjašević and Kruno Topolski, followed by a walk around the University Campus.

On Friday, the students worked on the SWOT analysis of the Galeb ship, a week-long task with an agenda of forming innovative interpretation proposals and a final document to be presented after working in situ at the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, in vicinity of the Sugar Refinery administrative building, a magnificent late Baroque palace remained from the former complex, built in 1786 in Rijeka. The building is currently in the process of renovation within the program of the “Touristic Valorisation of Representative Monuments of Rijeka’s Industrial Heritage” project, funded by the European Regional Development Fund – Operational Program “Competitiveness and Cohesion”. Once renovated, in 2020 the Baroque palace will become the new City Museum of Rijeka. The project is managed by the City of Rijeka in partnership with the Rijeka Tourist Board and the University of Rijeka – Center for Industrial Heritage and the CAS SEE.

Over the weekend, the volunteers visited Labin and Raša in Istria, where they had a guided tour and a short lecture on the interesting and somewhat hidden history of coal mining industrial town of Raša. On Monday, the working session continued with the Sugar Refinery analysis at the DeltaLab.

On Tuesday afternoon at Delta Lab the volunteers had another public event in the framework of the International Workshop on Interpretation of Industrial Heritage summer school, they were presenting examples of good practices from all over the world.

On Wednesday, the morning session began with a guided visit to the Sugar Refinery administrative building and then we continued the day with the analysis for the Sugar Refinery interpretation proposals at the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in Rijeka during another public event, the Open Doors Day, which gave the opportunity to welcome guests at the working site of the Museum. The volunteers also visited the opening of the newly built RiHub, a co-working space aimed at hosting the creative industry, Rijeka 2020 d.o.o. offices and freelancers as well as providing a space for versatile educational and creative events.

The final proposal presentation of innovative interpretations by the European Heritage Volunteers is set for Friday, Saturday 28th, starting at 5.00 pm at the Delta Lab (Delta 5) in Rijeka.


Notation, Algorithm, Criticism: Towards a Critical Epistemology of Architecture

Venue and date: IUC, Dubrovnik, September 17-22, 2018

Course description:

In modernity, there is no place for architecture without critical reflection, just as modern culture without cultural criticism is no better than the barbarism it has replaced (Schnädelbach). Critique is necessary of any activity, be it artistic, political, or scientific. In 1976, it was the „crisis of utopia” that laid the foundation for the late Manfredo Tafuri’s “ideological criticism”. By contrast, the philosopher and politician Massimo Cacciari maintained that crisis “must be produced”, thus proclaiming that any intellectual position that does not posit itself as productive in regard to crisis is reactionary.

Admittedly, we look back today with a certain nostalgia on a critical theory of architecture as it emerged in the 1960s — the heyday of critical thought in sociology and philosophy. Architects such as Peter Eisenman, Frank Gehry, and Bernhard Tschumi along with philosophers such as Theodor Adorno, Jacques Derrida, Gianni Vattimo, and Fredric Jameson were among the pioneers of critical discourse in architecture. Each had their own specific critical agenda, with some of them more inclined toward subversive methods that aimed at undermining architecture as the last stronghold of metaphysics. In architecture, critical theory always coincides with critical practice.

Since then, criticism has been absorbed and utilized by the very same institutions that it had helped to create. It can hardly be overlooked that in digital consumer societies, criticism has become a powerful economic agent. “The task of criticism has, in fact, changed,” Tafuri wrote in the introduction to his seminal book Theories and History of Architecture, published in 1976. But even more has changed with the advent of digital media technology. In unprecedented ways, today’s media technologies interfere with the practice of knowledge and change them according to their own – digital – agenda. Cacciari’s plea for crisis as a driving force for the production of knowledge has turned into a common cultural practice.

The seminar addressed the concept of critique in architecture from a historic as well as contemporary perspective. It investigated core concepts such as critique and practice, authorship and agency, history and documentation, concept and diagram, as well as idea and project. What are the possibilities of critical practice today in the age of digital transparency? What are the cultural, aesthetic, and social implications of the current transition from 2-D design processes to 3-D modeling (BIM)? Is this shift to digital media technology of equal importance as Alberti’s 15th century shift to notation? The transfer of ideas into drawings onto paper first opened up architecture to the creative and intellectual play of representation, and allowed for references to architectural history and its philosophical ideas. Architectural practice turned into a critical practice when it separated thinking about architecture from building architecture. The potential of graphic notation transformed architecture into a modern, ambivalent, contradictory, and critical cultural practice equal to literature and philosophy. At times, it seems as if media technology hollows out architecture’s critical consciousness and returns it to a simple practice of mere physical and material presence.

Course Directors:

Prof. Snjezana Prijic-Samarzija (University of Rijeka)

Prof. Joerg Gleiter (Technical University of Berlin)

Prof. Petar Bojanic (University of Belgrade/University of Rijeka)

Prof. Giovanni Durbiano (Politecnico di Torino)

Prof. Alessandro Armando (Politecnico di Torino)

 Lecturers:

Prof. Snjezana Prijic-Samarzija (University of Rijeka)

Prof. Joerg Gleiter (Technical University of Berlin)

Prof. Petar Bojanic (University of Belgrade/University of Rijeka)

Prof. Sanja Bojanic (University of Rijeka)

Prof. Alessandro Armando (Politecnico di Torino)

Dr. Lidia Gasperoni (Technical University of Berlin)

Dr. Christoph Engemann (Bauhaus-Universität Weimar)

Summer School Program

 

Industrial Heritage Interpretation Conference

Center for Industrial Heritage
and Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe at the University of Rijeka
in collaboration with the Culture Hub Croatia and European Heritage Volunteers

invite you to the

“Industrial Heritage Interpretation” Conference

September 18, 2018 at the Delta Lab (Delta 5, 51000 Rijeka)

Photo credits: Museum of the City of Rijeka

09.00 – 14.00 | Morning Session

09.00 – 10:30 | „Introduction to Heritage Interpretation – theoretical basis and principles“, doc. dr. sc. Darko Babić, University of Zagreb, Department of Information and Communication Sciences, Museology and Heritage Management Section, co-founder and president of the association Interpret Croatia

10.30 – 12:00 | „Touristic Valorisation of Industrial Heritage – trends, possibilities, products“, mr. sc. Vlasta Klarić, co-founder and vice-president of the heritage interpretation association – Interpret Croatia

12.00 – 14:30 | „Interpretative Heritage Planning“, lecture and workshop, Dragana Lucija Ratković Aydemir, Muze d.o.o.


15.30 – 18.00 | Afternoon Session

Participating:

Jelena Matešavac, Primorsko – goranska County, project Cultural-touristic route Itineraries of Frankopan

mr. sc. Vlatko Čakširan – Municipal Museum of Sisak, project Info center of industrial heritage – Holland House

Sonja Lukin, Tanja Pavlović- Flegar, the City of Rijeka, project Forget Heritage

Luka Rodela, Molekula association, presentation of the reuse center in the framework of the Forget Heritage project.

Photo credits: Museum of the City of Rijeka

The Summer School of Innovative Industrial Heritage Interpretation is organized by the Center for Industrial Heritage and the Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe at the University of Rijeka in cooperation with the European Heritage Volunteers organization and the Culture Hub Croatia Platform. The Summer School is one of University of Rijeka’s activities, within the program of the “Touristic Valorisation of Representative Monuments of Rijeka’s Industrial Heritage” project, funded by the European Regional Development Fund – Operational Program “Competitiveness and Cohesion”. The Croatia’s Ministry of Regional Development and the EU funds provided substantial amount of 68.891.606,18 kuna for the project’s development with the total worth of the project of 81.339.442,05 kuna. Find more information on the Project at the official website of the Center for Industrial Heritage at the University of Rijeka.

“Critique of Violence Now. From Thinking to Acting Against Violence” with Judith Butler

The CAS SEE 2018 Summer School “Critique of Violence Now. From Thinking to Acting Against Violence” (June 18 – 22, 2018) opened with at inaugural lecture by Judith Butler, entitled “Interpreting Non-Violence”. The event took place at the Croatian National Theater “Ivan pl. Zajc” in Rijeka on Monday, June 18th 2018. During the lecture Butler posed a question: who is the “we” that gathered at this occasion? Whoever we were, she said, we are all different, and conflict, is surely already among us. The challenge is to live with the conflict without (any) violence.

Judith Butler, Maxine Elliot Professor at the University of California, Berkeley, reminded us how our society stems from a powerful foundational fiction that is based on a conception of the human as masculine, self-sufficient, adult individual. This fiction inaugurates a societal structure that sustains ideas of individualism. But, what would happen if we tried another story?

We are all born into a condition of radical interdependency. Judith Butler advocated for changing our focus on interdependency against the self-sufficiency fantasy that is deeply rooted in our societies. Coming to the realization of our mutual interdependency is the condition of equality that can lead towards the understanding of our global obligations (toward our fellow humans, other animals, other living processes, and the environment). Butler argued against the mechanisms that cause that some lives are more grievable than others and some lives are more precarious than others. This is why an ethics of non-violence has to do with an equal distribution of the conditions of livability. In her final words, she concluded that arguing for non-violence is usually regarded as unrealistic, but maybe those who claim this are too enamored with reality.

On Tuesday 19th 2018, the City of Rijeka Town Hall hosted the public debate “Political Violence: is counterstrike possible?”, moderated by Manuela Bojadžijev (Humboldt University). In this debate, Donatella della Porta (Scuola Normale Superiore, Firenze) argued for the need of analyzing violence at different levels: macro (economic injustice and ethnic discrimination), meso (incapsulation of ideology), and micro (through acts of intolerant identities). Peter Fenves (Northwestern University) used Immanuel Kant’s fantasy of perpetual peace to argue that we do not have a fantasy of the state that can lead towards a theory of right. Do we, then, need new fantasies? Also, he presented Walter Benjamin’s idea of the connection between the state and criminality: criminality is an alibi to the State foundation – all States are organized violent organizations, and violent syndicates have pretensions of taking over the State.

Marc Crepon (Ecole Normale Superiore, Paris) added that there is a murderous consent as a dimension to our belonging to this world. Ignorance is also a part of murderous consent to violence and we need legal action of lawmakers to withhold certain forms of violence. Child labour, slavery, political violence, death penalty, domestic violence/masculine domination, are examples of violences that have to be tackled through legal actions. The media theorist Astrid Deuber-Mankowsky (Ruhr University Bochum) used the example of the Counter-Strike videogame to reflect on the politics of the game against terrorism.

Judith Butler reflected on the title of the debate: Is counterstrike possible? What is a strike? Is it violent or non-violent, or is it perhaps both? Is a non-violent counter-strike possible? We often think about violence as a physical blow, but is it the case for political violence? Political violence seems to act at the level of the state (police, army, prisons), of the violent laws (permitting genocide or femicide), of institutions (abandoning the migrants, for example). States also fail at taking political stances against these violences. And this, she argued, is not a physical blow, but it is violence. This passive way of failing to provide sanctuary fosters particular ways of circulating violence. In her final words, Manuela Bojadzijev claimed that nowadays it is more than ever necessary that institutions take an affirmative stance by pronouncing themselves as sanctuaries for migrants and for marginalized people. This positive act of taking positions in favor of human rights can maybe become the affirmative counterstrike that helps us face contemporary violences.

On Wednesday afternoon, June 21th, the Summer School rendered a tribute to Saba Mahmood, Professor of Anthropology at the University of California at Berkeley who passed away on March 10th, 2018. This tribute took form of a round table, moderated by Sanja Bojanić (UNIRI CAS SEE/Academy for Applied Arts), with participation by Judith Butler, Rebeka Anić (Institute of Social Sciences Ivo Pilar – Center Split), Zilka Spahić Šiljak (Standford University/TPO Foundation Sarajevo), Sanja Pontonjak, (University of Zagreb), Adriana Zaharijević (IFDT University of Belgrade), and Senka Božić (University of Zadar). Together, they reflected on Mahmood’s important contribution to contemporary debates on secularism, feminism, ethics and politics, with viewpoints that contested Western ideas on pious Muslim women.

For Saba Mahmood, secularism can be an instrument for intolerance and leads towards conflict because of its own ambiguity: it advocates equality while imposing inequalities and producing minorities. In this sense, the participants of the table deliberated on the features of a state that considers itself as secular, specifically reflecting on the Croatian context.

Regarding feminism, there was an interesting reflection on the relationship between secular and religious feminisms. It was stated that an entirely secular (or religious) feminism would be provincial; thus, it would be wise to overcome the secularism/religion divide in order to escape the reactive cycle that is often established and to work towards a cooperation between secular and religious feminisms.

Summer school organizers: University of Rijeka, Center for Advanced Studies Southeast Europe (UNIRI CAS SEE), Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory (University of Belgrade).

Partners: Friedrich Ebert Stiftung Zagreb, HNK Ivan pl. Zajc, Erste Stiftung, European Fund for the Balkans, Institut Francais Croatia, Consulato generale d’Italia – Fiume, Goethe Institute Zagreb, Art-kino Croatia and the City of Rijeka.

The 2018 Summer School program is part of the “Kitchen” and “Seasons of Power” Flagships of the project “Rijeka 2020 – European Capital of Culture.”

"Non-violent resistance works." A Talk Europe! interview with Judith Butler

Talk Europe!Is non-violent resistance able to end aggression and wars? And are there times when violence is, in fact, necessary? Judith Butler believes that non-violent resistance can be a strong and forceful instrument to undermine sources of state power and bring about change.Special thanks goes to the Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe for making this interview possible. #cassee #uniri

Objavljuje ERSTE Foundation u Srijeda, 29. kolovoza 2018.

The “Non-violent resistance works.” A Talk Europe! interview with Prof. Judith Butler, brought to us by ERSTE Foundation at the UNIRI CAS SEE in June 2018.

Fashion Week Spring 2018 – Food: Policies & Innovations

Fashion Week Spring 2018 – Food: Policies & Innovations gathered, for the first time in Croatia, the representatives of the European parliament, Croatian government, the civil sector, scientific community, media, architecture and activism in a two-day discussion on the growing economic, ecological, social and urban problem of Europe – food waste, donation and production. Organizers of the conference are European Capital of Culture Rijeka 2020, Center for Culture of Dialogue (CeKaDe), Food Network and CAS SEE.

The problem of rising food waste and insufficient food donations entered the Croatian media space with the removal of VAT on food donations in 2015. However, the change in the state of affairs has not been substantial enough.

Among the numerous conclusions of this spring’s Fashion Week are also the following:

  • It is necessary to establish a cooperation between civil society organizations and state entities for the purposes of dismantling legislative, logistical and administrative problems with regards to food donating
  • It is necessary to push for long-term education of donors and communication among intermediaries with regards to food donation and food waste, but also for possibilities of upgrading their operations
  • It is necessary to reduce food waste at every phase in the food distribution chain
  • It is necessary to educate citizens on the imprecision of “best before” signs on food and push for governmental responsibility to offer recommendations as to how long after the “best before” date can the food be regarded as available for consumption
  • It is advisable to create bold plans for urban food production in order to allow for the production of sufficient amount of quality food for the needs of the citizens (and Rijeka’s abandoned port areas offer a compelling site for reinvention for such purposes)

Fashion Week Spring 2018

Fashion Week Spring 2018 is organized in collaboration with CeKaDe (Center for the Culture of Dialogue) and Food Network, and its central theme is food. Researchers, politicians, business representatives, philosophers, architects and activists will – for the first time in Croatia – have chance to thoroughly discuss the developing a food network with the future possibility of universal access to food. The focus are the problem of food waste and the issue of upgrading the system of food donations, as well as reinventions and innovative solutions to food production in the urban environment. The program is developed in close collaboration with the “Food and Community” project, financed by European Social Fund and Office for Cooperation with NGOs of the Government of Republic of Croatia, which connects research on University of Rijeka with the efforts to establish the food network in Croatia.

Organizers of Fashion Week Spring 2018 – Food: Policy & Innovation are Rijeka2020 – European Capital of Culture, CeKaDe, Food Network and Center for Advanced Studies South East Europe.

Fashion Week is the seasonal showcase of Sweet&Salt flagship, which is part of the Rijeka – European Capital of Culture 2020 project, presenting the themes, concepts, works, plans and cooperative developments connected to the understanding and designing the future city through the context of Rijeka and the S&S territory.


Food: Policy & Innovation

Date and Venue: June 8 – 9, 2018

DeltaLab, Delta 5 (Ivex building), Rijeka

Day 1

8:00-9:00             Registration

9:00-9:15             Opening Ceremony

Snježana Prijić-Samaržija, Rector of the University of Rijeka

9:15-9:45             Food and Community – Presentation of the Project

Participants: Ana Bobinac, Project manager

Nenad Vretenar, Faculty of Economics, University of Rijeka

Nebojša Zelič, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Rijeka

9:45-10:00           Break

10:00-12:00        Food Policies: European Futures

Participants: Tomislav Tolušić, Minister of Agriculture and vice president of the Government of Republic of Croatia

Biljana Borzan, European Parliament Rapporteur on Food Waste

Mladen Iličković, Journalist, HRT (Croatian National Television)

Dražen Šimleša, ZMAG (Green network of activist groups)

Moderator: Zoran Grozdanov

12:00-13:00        Lunch

13:00-14:00        Donor Perspectives

Participants: Ivana Džakula, Director of Business Support Sector, Konzum

Kristina Klarić Rubčić, Head of Corporate Communications, Dukat

Vladimir Margeta, President of the Association of Croatian family farms

Marina Tomić, The Croatian Institute for Corporate Social Responsibility

Moderator: Vjekoslav Đaić

14:00-14:15        Break

14:15-16:30        How Much Food is Being Wasted?

Participants: Marija Batinić, Ministry of Agriculture, Directorate of Food and Phytosanitary Policy

Branka Ilakovac, Centre for the Prevention of Food Waste

Urša Zgojznik, Ecologists without Borders, Slovenia

Ana Marija Cuglin

Moderator: Ana Bobinac

Day 2

8:00-9:00             Registration

9:00-10:30           Innovation Fair with Coffee

Participants: Sanja Bijonda, President of Humanitarian Organization Portal dobrote

Food Not Bombs,

Food Network Croatia

Moderator: Marko Košak

10:30-10:45        Break

10:45-11:45        The Most Innovative Solution

Food Cloud, Ireland

COO Emma Walsh

11:45-12:00        Break

12:00-14:00        Food: Reinvention

Participants: Damian Sobol Turina – Rijeka Port Areas & Innovative Urban Food Production

Ante Toni Debelić, Growcity

Ida Križaj Leko – Food in the City

14:00                     Lunch



 

 

Public Lecture by Judith Butler: “Interpreting Non-Violence”

Venue: Croatian National Theatre Ivan pl. Zajc in Rijeka

Date and time: June 18th 2018 at 6 p.m.

This year’s Summer School opens with a public lecture by Judith Butler (University of California, Berkeley), entitled “Interpreting Non-Violence.” The lecture will be held on Monday, June 18th 2018, at 6.00 p.m. at the Croatian National Theatre ‘Ivan pl. Zajc’, and will be moderated by Sanja Bojanic (UNIRI CAS SEE; Academy of Applied Arts; Center for Women’s Studies, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences).

“Interpreting Non-Violence”

“If non-violence is to make sense as an ethical and political position, it cannot simply repress aggression or do away with its reality; rather, non-violence should emerge as a meaningful concept precisely when destruction is most likely or seems most certain.

We need to think first about an ethics of non-violence that presupposes forms of dependency, and interdependency that are unmanageable or become the source of conflict and aggression. Second, it proposes that we consider how our understanding of equality relates to the ethics and politics of non-violence. For that connection to make sense, we would have to admit into our idea of political equality the equal grievability of lives. Only a disorientation from a presumptive individualism will let us understand the possibility of an aggressive non-violence, one that emerges in the midst of conflict, one that takes hold in the force field of violence itself.”

 Judith Butler is Maxine Elliot Professor in the Department of Comparative Literature and the Program in Critical Theory at the University of California, Berkeley. She served as Founding Director of the Program in Critical Theory. A prolific author, she is perhaps best known for “Subjects of Desire: Hegelian Reflections in Twentieth-Century France” (1987); “Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity” (1990); “Bodies That Matter: On the Discursive Limits of ‘Sex’” (1993); “Frames of War: When Is Life Grievable?” (2009); and “Is Critique Secular?” (co-written with Talal Asad, Wendy Brown, and Saba Mahmood, 2009). Her most recent books include: “Notes Toward a Performative Theory of Assembly” (2015); “Vulnerability in Resistance,” (2016), edited with Zeynep Gambetti and Leticia Sabsay.

Butler is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Andrew W. Mellon Award for Distinguished Academic Achievement in the Humanities (2009-13). She is currently the principal investigator in a four-year grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to develop the International Consortium of Critical Theory Programs. Her visit to Rijeka is part of this endeavor, since the Center for Advanced Studies Southeast Europe and the Center for Women’s Studies (both of the University of Rijeka) and the Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory (University of Belgrade) are Consortium members.

Tickets to the lecture are free, but need to be reserved ahead of time. Please e-mail blagajna@hnk-zajc.hr or call +385 (0)51 337 114 to reserve. Reserved tickets are available for pick-up no later than twenty-four hours before the event. The theater box office hours of operation are Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., as well as two hours before the event.

The lecture will be followed by the play TURBOFOLK-RiLOUDID, a production of Croatian National Theatre Ivan pl. Zajc in Rijeka, beginning at 8 p.m. Tickets for the play can be purchased at the box office of Croatian National Theatre Ivan pl. Zajc in Rijeka or online at Ulaznice.hr, starting on May 28th, 2018.

Panel discussion: “Political Violence: Is Counterstrike Possible?”

Rijeka June 19th at 5 p.m. | City of Rijeka Town Hall

“Southeastern Europe has seen more than its share of violence. It has also seen loud proclamations of anti-violent ideology from states and governments, from organizations of civil society, down to sundry public voices. The region has seen the adoption and implementation of various EU laws and policies to a far greater and more drastic extent than even in their countries of origin. This trend is partly a symptom of identity crises and identity insecurity, for which policies are designed to curtail all kinds of societal violence, shifting power towards ever-increasing prerogatives of wanton administrations. Instances of violence tend to be interpreted as systemic social degeneration that needs to be uprooted by draconian control and repressive policies. The results are a police force and state institutions with sweeping authority over individuals on the one hand, and widespread apathy and defeatism among ordinary people, on the other. Thus, the study of violence as well as anti-violence policy addresses a core quality of life issue in Southeastern Europe.”

The panel discussion “Political Violence: Is Counterstrike Possible?,” in addition to Judith Butler and the mayor of the city of Rijeka, Vojko Obersnel, will include by Donatella della Porta (Scuola Normale Superiore di Firenze), Astrid Deuber-Mankowsky (Ruhr University Bochum), Peter Fenves (Northwestern University) and Marc Crepon (Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris), and will be moderated by Vedran Dzihic (oiip/UNIRI CAS SEE). The discussion will be held in English.

Round Table with Judith Butler “In Tribute to Saba Mahmood”

Rijeka | June 20th 2018, 5:30 p.m. | Art-kino Croatia

The round table discussion, entitled In Tribute to Saba Mahmood, is dedicated to the recently deceased anthropologist from the University of California, Berkeley who dedicated her scientific research career to studying the relationship of different religious forms and sexual practices, in particular as regards women. At the conversation in Art-kino Croatia, guests from the region will join Judith Butler in evoking Saba Mahmood’s book Religious Difference in a Secular Age. A Minority Report, focusing specifically on aspects directly relevant to the regional context. Participating in the conversation are Rebeka Anic (Institute of Social Sciences Ivo Pilar – Split), Zilka Spahic Siljak (University of Stanford, TPO Foundation Sarajevo), Sanja Potkonjak (University of Zagreb), Adriana Zaharijevic (IFDT, University of Belgrade), Senka Bozic (University of Zadar), and will be moderated by Sanja Bojanic (CAS SEE, APURI). The discussion will be held in Croatian and English. The round table will be followed by the projection of Martha Rosler’s film Semiotics of the Kitchen (USA, 1975).

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Organizers: University of Rijeka, Center for Advanced Studies Southeast Europe (UNIRI CAS SEE) and the Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory (University of Belgrade).

Partners: Friedrich Ebert Stiftung Zagreb, HNK Ivan pl. Zajc, Erste Stiftung, European Fund for the Balkans, Institut Francais Croatia, Consulato generale d’Italia – Fiume, Goethe Institute Zagreb, Art-kino Croatia and the City of Rijeka. The Summer School program is part of the “Kitchen” and “Seasons of Power” Flagships of the project “Rijeka 2020 – European Capital of Culture.”