summer school

Closing of the Summer school of Innovative interpretation of industrial heritage

The press conference and the official closing of the Summer School of Innovative Interpretation of Industrial Heritage program was held on Friday, September 28th, at the Delta Lab in Rijeka. The Summer school is a part of the “Touristic Valorisation of Representative Monuments of Rijeka’s Industrial Heritage” program, and on this subject, the program was presented by Prof. Snježana Prijić Samaržija, Rector of the University of Rijeka, Mr Ivan Šarar, Head of the Department of Culture and the project leader of “Touristic Valorisation of Representative Monuments of Rijeka’s Industrial Heritage”, Dr. Bert Ludwig, director of European Heritage Volunteers and Marina Batinić, co-founder of Culture Hub Croatia, alongside of Kristina Pandža, Project and Research Coordinator at the University of Rijeka – the education and research component and one of the partners in project implementation.

The University Rector, Prof. Snježana Prijić Samaržija stated that it takes courage and motivation to come to a foreign city and to try to interpret its industrial and cultural heritage, and that the whole concept of the summer school is innovative in itself so that the product remaining as its legacy, the proposals of student’s interpretation of Rijeka’s (industrial) heritage is equally innovative as is the way it has come to being.

Mr Ivan Šarar pointed out that sometimes the current social climate and the “tones” of daily political polemics can go far from any congruous interpretations of the heritage that is the subject of this debate. It’s really about two allegoric and symbolically charged represents of the city. These two objects are and continue to remain open platforms for diverse interpretations, so these (student’s) inputs remain equally important in a reality that never ceases to interpret its history.

Dr Bert Ludwig presented the work and activities of European Heritage Volunteers organization with different participatory projects open to the public, such as European Heritage Volunteers Projects, European Heritage Training Projects, World Heritage UNESCO Projects, EHV Partner Projects.

Marina Batinić, co-founder of Culture Hub Croatia reflected on the importance of the experiences accumulated abroad with exchange being one of the most valuable resources of the volunteers which indeed reflects on the local context, but also manages to shape broader, international co-operations and projects. At the end, she concluded that history is valuable in itself – it cannot and doesn’t have to be forgotten but giving chance to the young experts to provide some possible future perspectives and a positive relationship with the heritage is really what is most important.

After a brief discussion on the Project goals and the relevance of heritage interpretation, the student – volunteers from Croatia, Italy, Hungary, Chile, Germany, Russia, Taiwan and China took the stage to present the innovative heritage interpretation proposals, focusing on the “Galeb” ship and the Sugar Refinery administrative building in Rijeka.

During the past two weeks of intense workshops and discussions in Rijeka, the final report „Between Past, Present and Future – Interpreting the Industrial Heritage of Rijeka” with more than thirty proposals was produced as a result and the legacy of the volunteers joint work and can be downloaded here, as well as on the Center for Industrial Heritage and Culture Hub Croatia websites.

Summer School of Innovative Interpretation of Industrial Heritage

Summer School of Innovative Interpretation of Industrial Heritage, organized by Center for Industrial Heritage and Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe of University of Rijeka in cooperation with Culture Hub Croatia and European Heritage Volunteers, started on Monday, 17th of September with the volunteers’ visit to the City of Rijeka, where they were welcomed by Deputy Mayor Marko Filipović, Ivan Šarar, Head of the Department of Culture at the City of Rijeka and Ms Helga Večerinović, expert associate for product development at the City of Rijeka Turist Board.

During the two weeks long Summer School, the students from Croatia, China, Russia, Chile, Hungary, Germany, Italy and Taiwan investigated and researched the possibilities of the innovative interpretation of the school ship „Galeb“ and the Sugar Refinery, two representative objects of Rijeka’s industrial heritage, which are currently in the process of renovation. The mentioned reception at the City of Rijeka was also an opportunity for a short presentation of the project “Touristic Valorisation of Representative Monuments of Rijeka’s Industrial Heritage”, funded by the European Regional Development Fund – Operational Program “Competitiveness and Cohesion”. The Croatia’s Ministry of Regional Development and the EU funds provided substantial amount of 68.891.606,18 kuna for the project’s development, with the total worth of the project of 81.339.442,05 kuna.

On Tuesday, 18th of September, Summer School program continued in Delta Lab, with a Conference on the Interpretation of Industrial Heritage, with experts from the field of cultural and industrial heritage valorisation and interpretation, including doc. dr. sc. Darko Babić (University of Zagreb, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Department of Information and Communication Sciences) co-founder of the “Interpret Croatia” Association, who provided a remarkable and detailed overview of the interpretation theory, focusing on the need of creating an emotional link between the audiences and the (information regarding) the heritage, and focusing on interpretation as a creative informal education and, moreover, the importance of understanding that heritage comes into being by being interpreted. He concluded that the ideal situation is that in which the local communities recognize their heritage and know what they want to gain from it and then seek the experts to tell its story.

The program continued with lectures and workshop with the „Muses“: Dragana Lucija Ratković Aydemir and Ivana Jagic Boljat who emphasized the importance of good communication and openness in working with the clients and the users of the interpretation, and the pronounced relevance of understanding the needs of the local communities from the very start of interpretation process. The afternoon session continued with lectures and presentations of best practice examples with Jelena Mateševac (Primorje-Gorski Kotar County) presenting the project Cultural-tourist Route “the Routes of the Frankopans”, followed by mr. sc. Vlatko Čakširan (City Museum Sisak) presenting the „Info center of Industrial Heritage – Holland House“. Best practice example with regards to EU projects aimed at promoting co-operation between central European cities, and providing other cities, though their associations, with recommendations on how to improve hidden cultural heritage potentials were presented by Sonja Lukin and Tanja Pavlovic – Flegar (City of Rijeka), with the „Forget Heritage“ project, followed by Luka Rodela (Molekula Association) presenting the re-use center pilot within the same project, providing us with a short „beginners guide“ to heritage management in the context of forlorn industrial factories of Rijeka.

On Wednesday, September 19th, the most important current Rijeka project, Rijeka 2020 – European Capital of Culture was presented by Dorian Celcer, Partnership and Protocol Coordinator at the Rijeka2020 d.o.o.  He provided a showcase of the initial idea, application process, current developments and the seven flagships overview with the goals and legacy of the project, expected after 2020.

On Thursday, the volunteers were greeted by the University of Rijeka representatives, Prof. Sanja Baric, Vice Rector for Studies and Students, and Associate Professor Bojana Ćulum, Department of Education at the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, giving an overview of the University’s policies and strategies aimed at developing and fostering student activism and volunteering. The volunteers also met with the representatives of the Student Council at the University of Rijeka: Margime Hasani, Tea Dimnjašević and Kruno Topolski, followed by a walk around the University Campus.

On Friday, the students worked on the SWOT analysis of the Galeb ship, a week-long task with an agenda of forming innovative interpretation proposals and a final document to be presented after working in situ at the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, in vicinity of the Sugar Refinery administrative building, a magnificent late Baroque palace remained from the former complex, built in 1786 in Rijeka. The building is currently in the process of renovation within the program of the “Touristic Valorisation of Representative Monuments of Rijeka’s Industrial Heritage” project, funded by the European Regional Development Fund – Operational Program “Competitiveness and Cohesion”. Once renovated, in 2020 the Baroque palace will become the new City Museum of Rijeka. The project is managed by the City of Rijeka in partnership with the Rijeka Tourist Board and the University of Rijeka – Center for Industrial Heritage and the CAS SEE.

Over the weekend, the volunteers visited Labin and Raša in Istria, where they had a guided tour and a short lecture on the interesting and somewhat hidden history of coal mining industrial town of Raša. On Monday, the working session continued with the Sugar Refinery analysis at the DeltaLab.

On Tuesday afternoon at Delta Lab the volunteers had another public event in the framework of the International Workshop on Interpretation of Industrial Heritage summer school, they were presenting examples of good practices from all over the world.

On Wednesday, the morning session began with a guided visit to the Sugar Refinery administrative building and then we continued the day with the analysis for the Sugar Refinery interpretation proposals at the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in Rijeka during another public event, the Open Doors Day, which gave the opportunity to welcome guests at the working site of the Museum. The volunteers also visited the opening of the newly built RiHub, a co-working space aimed at hosting the creative industry, Rijeka 2020 d.o.o. offices and freelancers as well as providing a space for versatile educational and creative events.

The final proposal presentation of innovative interpretations by the European Heritage Volunteers is set for Friday, Saturday 28th, starting at 5.00 pm at the Delta Lab (Delta 5) in Rijeka.


Notation, Algorithm, Criticism: Towards a Critical Epistemology of Architecture

Venue and date: IUC, Dubrovnik, September 17-22, 2018

Course description:

In modernity, there is no place for architecture without critical reflection, just as modern culture without cultural criticism is no better than the barbarism it has replaced (Schnädelbach). Critique is necessary of any activity, be it artistic, political, or scientific. In 1976, it was the „crisis of utopia” that laid the foundation for the late Manfredo Tafuri’s “ideological criticism”. By contrast, the philosopher and politician Massimo Cacciari maintained that crisis “must be produced”, thus proclaiming that any intellectual position that does not posit itself as productive in regard to crisis is reactionary.

Admittedly, we look back today with a certain nostalgia on a critical theory of architecture as it emerged in the 1960s — the heyday of critical thought in sociology and philosophy. Architects such as Peter Eisenman, Frank Gehry, and Bernhard Tschumi along with philosophers such as Theodor Adorno, Jacques Derrida, Gianni Vattimo, and Fredric Jameson were among the pioneers of critical discourse in architecture. Each had their own specific critical agenda, with some of them more inclined toward subversive methods that aimed at undermining architecture as the last stronghold of metaphysics. In architecture, critical theory always coincides with critical practice.

Since then, criticism has been absorbed and utilized by the very same institutions that it had helped to create. It can hardly be overlooked that in digital consumer societies, criticism has become a powerful economic agent. “The task of criticism has, in fact, changed,” Tafuri wrote in the introduction to his seminal book Theories and History of Architecture, published in 1976. But even more has changed with the advent of digital media technology. In unprecedented ways, today’s media technologies interfere with the practice of knowledge and change them according to their own – digital – agenda. Cacciari’s plea for crisis as a driving force for the production of knowledge has turned into a common cultural practice.

The seminar addressed the concept of critique in architecture from a historic as well as contemporary perspective. It investigated core concepts such as critique and practice, authorship and agency, history and documentation, concept and diagram, as well as idea and project. What are the possibilities of critical practice today in the age of digital transparency? What are the cultural, aesthetic, and social implications of the current transition from 2-D design processes to 3-D modeling (BIM)? Is this shift to digital media technology of equal importance as Alberti’s 15th century shift to notation? The transfer of ideas into drawings onto paper first opened up architecture to the creative and intellectual play of representation, and allowed for references to architectural history and its philosophical ideas. Architectural practice turned into a critical practice when it separated thinking about architecture from building architecture. The potential of graphic notation transformed architecture into a modern, ambivalent, contradictory, and critical cultural practice equal to literature and philosophy. At times, it seems as if media technology hollows out architecture’s critical consciousness and returns it to a simple practice of mere physical and material presence.

Course Directors:

Prof. Snjezana Prijic-Samarzija (University of Rijeka)

Prof. Joerg Gleiter (Technical University of Berlin)

Prof. Petar Bojanic (University of Belgrade/University of Rijeka)

Prof. Giovanni Durbiano (Politecnico di Torino)

Prof. Alessandro Armando (Politecnico di Torino)

 Lecturers:

Prof. Snjezana Prijic-Samarzija (University of Rijeka)

Prof. Joerg Gleiter (Technical University of Berlin)

Prof. Petar Bojanic (University of Belgrade/University of Rijeka)

Prof. Sanja Bojanic (University of Rijeka)

Prof. Alessandro Armando (Politecnico di Torino)

Dr. Lidia Gasperoni (Technical University of Berlin)

Dr. Christoph Engemann (Bauhaus-Universität Weimar)

Summer School Program

 

Industrial Heritage Interpretation Conference

Center for Industrial Heritage
and Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe at the University of Rijeka
in collaboration with the Culture Hub Croatia and European Heritage Volunteers

invite you to the

“Industrial Heritage Interpretation” Conference

September 18, 2018 at the Delta Lab (Delta 5, 51000 Rijeka)

Photo credits: Museum of the City of Rijeka

09.00 – 14.00 | Morning Session

09.00 – 10:30 | „Introduction to Heritage Interpretation – theoretical basis and principles“, doc. dr. sc. Darko Babić, University of Zagreb, Department of Information and Communication Sciences, Museology and Heritage Management Section, co-founder and president of the association Interpret Croatia

10.30 – 12:00 | „Touristic Valorisation of Industrial Heritage – trends, possibilities, products“, mr. sc. Vlasta Klarić, co-founder and vice-president of the heritage interpretation association – Interpret Croatia

12.00 – 14:30 | „Interpretative Heritage Planning“, lecture and workshop, Dragana Lucija Ratković Aydemir, Muze d.o.o.


15.30 – 18.00 | Afternoon Session

Participating:

Jelena Matešavac, Primorsko – goranska County, project Cultural-touristic route Itineraries of Frankopan

mr. sc. Vlatko Čakširan – Municipal Museum of Sisak, project Info center of industrial heritage – Holland House

Sonja Lukin, Tanja Pavlović- Flegar, the City of Rijeka, project Forget Heritage

Luka Rodela, Molekula association, presentation of the reuse center in the framework of the Forget Heritage project.

Photo credits: Museum of the City of Rijeka

The Summer School of Innovative Industrial Heritage Interpretation is organized by the Center for Industrial Heritage and the Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe at the University of Rijeka in cooperation with the European Heritage Volunteers organization and the Culture Hub Croatia Platform. The Summer School is one of University of Rijeka’s activities, within the program of the “Touristic Valorisation of Representative Monuments of Rijeka’s Industrial Heritage” project, funded by the European Regional Development Fund – Operational Program “Competitiveness and Cohesion”. The Croatia’s Ministry of Regional Development and the EU funds provided substantial amount of 68.891.606,18 kuna for the project’s development with the total worth of the project of 81.339.442,05 kuna. Find more information on the Project at the official website of the Center for Industrial Heritage at the University of Rijeka.

Round Table “In Tribute to Saba Mahmood” with Judith Butler

Round Table with Judith Butler “In Tribute to Saba Mahmood” took place at the Art-kino Croatia in Rijeka on June 20th 2018,  within the summer school “Critique of Violence Now: from Thinking to Acting against Violence” program.

The round table discussion, entitled In Tribute to Saba Mahmood, was dedicated to the recently deceased anthropologist from the University of California, Berkeley who dedicated her scientific research career to studying the relationship of different religious forms and sexual practices, in particular as regards women. At the conversation in Art-kino Croatia, guests from the region joined Judith Butler in evoking Saba Mahmood’s book Religious Difference in a Secular Age. A Minority Report, focusing specifically on aspects directly relevant to the regional context. Participating in the conversation: Rebeka Anic (Institute of Social Sciences Ivo Pilar – Split), Zilka Spahic Siljak (University of Stanford, TPO Foundation Sarajevo), Sanja Potkonjak (University of Zagreb), Adriana Zaharijevic (IFDT, University of Belgrade), Senka Bozic (University of Zadar), with moderation by Sanja Bojanic (CAS SEE, APURI). The discussion was held in Croatian and English. The round table was followed by the projection of Martha Rosler’s film Semiotics of the Kitchen (USA, 1975).

Organizers: University of Rijeka, Center for Advanced Studies Southeast Europe (UNIRI CAS SEE), Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory (University of Belgrade).

Partners: Friedrich Ebert Stiftung Zagreb, Croatian National Theatre Ivan pl. Zajc, Erste Stiftung, European Fund for the Balkans, Institut Francais Croatia, Consulato generale d’Italia – Fiume, Goethe Institute Zagreb, Art-kino Croatia and the City of Rijeka. The Summer School program was part of the “Kitchen” and “Seasons of Power” Flagships of the project “Rijeka 2020 – European Capital of Culture.”

Photo credits: Art-kino Croatia

“Critique of Violence Now. From Thinking to Acting Against Violence” with Judith Butler

The CAS SEE 2018 Summer School “Critique of Violence Now. From Thinking to Acting Against Violence” (June 18 – 22, 2018) opened with at inaugural lecture by Judith Butler, entitled “Interpreting Non-Violence”. The event took place at the Croatian National Theater “Ivan pl. Zajc” in Rijeka on Monday, June 18th 2018. During the lecture Butler posed a question: who is the “we” that gathered at this occasion? Whoever we were, she said, we are all different, and conflict, is surely already among us. The challenge is to live with the conflict without (any) violence.

Judith Butler, Maxine Elliot Professor at the University of California, Berkeley, reminded us how our society stems from a powerful foundational fiction that is based on a conception of the human as masculine, self-sufficient, adult individual. This fiction inaugurates a societal structure that sustains ideas of individualism. But, what would happen if we tried another story?

We are all born into a condition of radical interdependency. Judith Butler advocated for changing our focus on interdependency against the self-sufficiency fantasy that is deeply rooted in our societies. Coming to the realization of our mutual interdependency is the condition of equality that can lead towards the understanding of our global obligations (toward our fellow humans, other animals, other living processes, and the environment). Butler argued against the mechanisms that cause that some lives are more grievable than others and some lives are more precarious than others. This is why an ethics of non-violence has to do with an equal distribution of the conditions of livability. In her final words, she concluded that arguing for non-violence is usually regarded as unrealistic, but maybe those who claim this are too enamored with reality.

On Tuesday 19th 2018, the City of Rijeka Town Hall hosted the public debate “Political Violence: is counterstrike possible?”, moderated by Manuela Bojadžijev (Humboldt University). In this debate, Donatella della Porta (Scuola Normale Superiore, Firenze) argued for the need of analyzing violence at different levels: macro (economic injustice and ethnic discrimination), meso (incapsulation of ideology), and micro (through acts of intolerant identities). Peter Fenves (Northwestern University) used Immanuel Kant’s fantasy of perpetual peace to argue that we do not have a fantasy of the state that can lead towards a theory of right. Do we, then, need new fantasies? Also, he presented Walter Benjamin’s idea of the connection between the state and criminality: criminality is an alibi to the State foundation – all States are organized violent organizations, and violent syndicates have pretensions of taking over the State.

Marc Crepon (Ecole Normale Superiore, Paris) added that there is a murderous consent as a dimension to our belonging to this world. Ignorance is also a part of murderous consent to violence and we need legal action of lawmakers to withhold certain forms of violence. Child labour, slavery, political violence, death penalty, domestic violence/masculine domination, are examples of violences that have to be tackled through legal actions. The media theorist Astrid Deuber-Mankowsky (Ruhr University Bochum) used the example of the Counter-Strike videogame to reflect on the politics of the game against terrorism.

Judith Butler reflected on the title of the debate: Is counterstrike possible? What is a strike? Is it violent or non-violent, or is it perhaps both? Is a non-violent counter-strike possible? We often think about violence as a physical blow, but is it the case for political violence? Political violence seems to act at the level of the state (police, army, prisons), of the violent laws (permitting genocide or femicide), of institutions (abandoning the migrants, for example). States also fail at taking political stances against these violences. And this, she argued, is not a physical blow, but it is violence. This passive way of failing to provide sanctuary fosters particular ways of circulating violence. In her final words, Manuela Bojadzijev claimed that nowadays it is more than ever necessary that institutions take an affirmative stance by pronouncing themselves as sanctuaries for migrants and for marginalized people. This positive act of taking positions in favor of human rights can maybe become the affirmative counterstrike that helps us face contemporary violences.

On Wednesday afternoon, June 21th, the Summer School rendered a tribute to Saba Mahmood, Professor of Anthropology at the University of California at Berkeley who passed away on March 10th, 2018. This tribute took form of a round table, moderated by Sanja Bojanić (UNIRI CAS SEE/Academy for Applied Arts), with participation by Judith Butler, Rebeka Anić (Institute of Social Sciences Ivo Pilar – Center Split), Zilka Spahić Šiljak (Standford University/TPO Foundation Sarajevo), Sanja Pontonjak, (University of Zagreb), Adriana Zaharijević (IFDT University of Belgrade), and Senka Božić (University of Zadar). Together, they reflected on Mahmood’s important contribution to contemporary debates on secularism, feminism, ethics and politics, with viewpoints that contested Western ideas on pious Muslim women.

For Saba Mahmood, secularism can be an instrument for intolerance and leads towards conflict because of its own ambiguity: it advocates equality while imposing inequalities and producing minorities. In this sense, the participants of the table deliberated on the features of a state that considers itself as secular, specifically reflecting on the Croatian context.

Regarding feminism, there was an interesting reflection on the relationship between secular and religious feminisms. It was stated that an entirely secular (or religious) feminism would be provincial; thus, it would be wise to overcome the secularism/religion divide in order to escape the reactive cycle that is often established and to work towards a cooperation between secular and religious feminisms.

Summer school organizers: University of Rijeka, Center for Advanced Studies Southeast Europe (UNIRI CAS SEE), Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory (University of Belgrade).

Partners: Friedrich Ebert Stiftung Zagreb, HNK Ivan pl. Zajc, Erste Stiftung, European Fund for the Balkans, Institut Francais Croatia, Consulato generale d’Italia – Fiume, Goethe Institute Zagreb, Art-kino Croatia and the City of Rijeka.

The 2018 Summer School program is part of the “Kitchen” and “Seasons of Power” Flagships of the project “Rijeka 2020 – European Capital of Culture.”

"Non-violent resistance works." A Talk Europe! interview with Judith Butler

Talk Europe!Is non-violent resistance able to end aggression and wars? And are there times when violence is, in fact, necessary? Judith Butler believes that non-violent resistance can be a strong and forceful instrument to undermine sources of state power and bring about change.Special thanks goes to the Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe for making this interview possible. #cassee #uniri

Objavljuje ERSTE Foundation u Srijeda, 29. kolovoza 2018.

The “Non-violent resistance works.” A Talk Europe! interview with Prof. Judith Butler, brought to us by ERSTE Foundation at the UNIRI CAS SEE in June 2018.

Summer School Program: “Critique of Violence Now: from Thinking to Acting against Violence”

University of Rijeka, Center for Advanced Studies Southeast Europe (UNIRI CAS SEE)

In cooperation with
The Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory University of Belgrade

Supported by Friedrich Ebert Stiftung Zagreb, National Theatre Ivan pl. Zajc, Goethe Institute Zagreb, Erste Foundation, European Fund for the Balkans, French Institute Croatia, Consulato generale d’Italia – Fiume, City of Rijeka, Art-kino Croatia

Venues: Akvarij, University campus, Croatian National Theatre Ivan pl. Zajc, DeltaLab, Art-kino Croatia, City of Rijeka Town Hall

Dates: June 18th – 22nd 2018

Rationale and background:

The 2018 CAS SEE Summer School examines one of today’s most pressing topics: how to think and what to do with violence in our present society. To what extent is it possible to deconstruct and name the emerging mechanisms of violence? What kinds of phenomena precipitate coercion and violence, making it difficult to suppress and rendering it seemingly inevitable? Assuming that in myriad social contexts, violence is not a self-contained, but rather a relational/social phenomenon (across families, associations, corporations, nations, states, religions), is there any social purpose to it, and does it have any productive alternative? Is violence a form of communication, and might there be strategic communicative substitutes that could non-repressively reduce the recourse to violence?

Southeastern Europe has seen more than its share of violence. It has also seen loud proclamations of anti-violent ideology from states and governments, from organizations of civil society, down to sundry public voices. The region has seen the adoption and implementation of various EU laws and policies to a far greater and more drastic extent than even in their countries of origin. This trend is partly a symptom of identity crises and identity insecurity, for which policies are designed to curtail all kinds of societal violence, shifting power towards ever-increasing prerogatives of wanton administrations. Instances of violence tend to be interpreted as systemic social degeneration that needs to be uprooted by draconian control and repressive policies. The results are a police force and state institutions with sweeping authority over individuals on the one hand, and widespread apathy and defeatism among ordinary people, on the other. Thus, the study of violence as well as anti-violence policy addresses a core quality of life issue in Southeastern Europe.

“Critique of Violence Now” will:

  • Provide a framework for an exchange of views and insights among activists and academics on the following topics: political violence, administrative violence, legal violence, domestic violence, collective violence in the regional and global context, countering (discourses of) violence through social engagement, social inequalities and neoliberal conquest of state and society;
  • Inspire and build capacity of participants through stimulating topical and theoretical input by renowned academics, creating opportunities for building networks and joint cooperation actions in the field;
  • Provide workspaces for the participants to discuss and work on short papers (approx. 3 pages) dedicated to four major clusters: “Political Violence: Revisited”; “Administrative Violence: Migration”; “Ethnicized Violence”; “Deconstructing Misogyny and Patriarchy”. Papers (in English) would be further refined immediately after the Summer School and published in a volume edited by the Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory of the University of Belgrade (IFDT University of Belgrade).

The Summer School is organized as part of the International Consortium of Critical Theory Programs supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, of which UNIRI CAS SEE and IFDT University of Belgrade are members. The event will also serve to confer the inaugural prize for critical theoretical engagement ”Miladin Zivotic”, established in 2017 by IFDT University of Belgrade. The award is bestowed on those social theorists whose work has had significant impact on the broader public, exemplifying socially engaged theory and theoretically grounded social engagement.


Program and Timetable


Program Board of the Summer School:

Petar Bojanic (IFDT University of Belgrade, UNIRI CAS SEE), Astrid Deuber-Mankowsky (Ruhr University Bochum), Vedran Dzihic (oiip / UNIRI CAS SEE), Manuela Bojadzijev (Humboldt University), Sanja Bojanic (UNIRI CAS SEE; Center for Women Studies UNIRI, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences), Adriana Zaharijevic (IFDT, University of Belgrade) and Gazela Pudar Drasko (IFDT, University of Belgrade).

Organization Board:

Monica Cano Abadia, Kristina Smoljanovic, Natasa Jankovic (UNIRI CAS SEE); Ana Ajdukovic (Center For Women Studies, FFRI); Marlene Weck (FFRI/University of Freiburg); Marilea Pudar (IFDT University of Belgrade) and Edward Djordjevic (FFRI)

Summer school visuals are designed by Natasa Jankovic.

Contact: cas@cas.uniri.hr

Program of the “Equality and Citizenship” Summer School

The Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe, the University of Rijeka, the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of Rijeka and the Croatian Society for Analytic Philosophy are organizing the 5th edition of the Equality and Citizenship Summer school from June 25th – 29th, 2018 in Rijeka, Croatia.

Summer school program and full schedule is available at the following link: Equality and Citizenship 2018

The Summer school does not reproduce, in a diluted form, the familiar teaching format of a university course. Instead, it is organized around “Author-Meets-Critics” symposia that are dedicated to publications and works-in-progress by some distinguished authors. All the leading participants will give a paper on a topic on which they are currently working, or a précis of a recently published book. During the symposia dedicated to them, they will then reply to the papers given by the other scholars.

This year’s leading participants are:

Prof Cecile Laborde, University of Oxford

Prof Julian Savulescu, University of Oxford

Prof Jonathan White, The London School of Economics and Political Science

Prof Lea Ypi, the London School of Economics and Political Science

The summer school is primarily aimed at attracting post-doc researchers and doctoral students. All participants will receive a certificate of participation that describes the activities in which they have participated at the summer school. The accepted candidates must pay 100 € / 750 HRK participation fee by June 10th, 2018 on the following account:

  • Account Holder: Filozofski fakultet u Rijeci, Sveučilišna avenija 4, 51000 Rijeka, Hrvatska / Croatia
  • Name of the Bank: Zagrebačka banka d.d. Zagreb, Paromlinska 2, 10000 Zagreb, Hrvatska / Croatia
  • SWIFT/BIC: ZABAHR2X
  • IBAN: HR9123600001101536455
  • “Za ljetnu školu političke filozofije” / for the Summer school of Political Philosophy
  • “Poziv na broj” / Reference Number: 0800010014

Organizers of the Summer school can cover scholarships for a limited number of participants, but a motivated request is needed.

1) Accommodation

Participants can book rooms in one of Rijeka’s Hostels , Hotels or Private Accomodation.

2) Further information

Useful information about the city of Rijeka can be found at: http://www.visitrijeka.eu/

If any further details are needed, please contact us at: politicalphilosophy@cas.uniri.hr

Updated information regarding the summer school will be available at the CAS SEE website.

Directors of the Summer school:

Prof Elvio Baccarini, University of Rijeka

Prof Snježana Prijić-Samaržija, University of Rijeka

Asst Prof Nebojša Zelič, University of Rijeka

Organization Board:

Dr Ivan Cerovac, University of Rijeka

Siba Harb, University of Leuven

Viktor Ivanković, CEU Budapest

Assoc Prof Luca Malatesti, University of Rijeka

Andrea Mešanović, University of Rijeka

Aleksandar Šušnjar, University of Rijeka

Critique of Violence Now: From Thinking to Acting against Violence

2018 CAS SEE Summer School
Rijeka, June 18 – 22, 2018

Guest lecturers:

Judith Butler (Berkeley University)

Hervé Le Brass (Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, Paris)

Peter Fenves (Northwestern University)

Alexis Nuselovici-Nouss (University of Aix-Marseille, Fondation Maison des sciences de l’homme)

Astrid Deuber-Mankowsky (Ruhr University Bochum)

Marc Crepon (Ecole normale supérieure, Paris)

 

Rationale and background:

The 2018 CAS SEE Summer School examines one of today’s most pressing topics: how to think and what to do with violence in our present society. To what extent is it possible to deconstruct and name emerging mechanisms of violence? What are the kinds of phenomena that escalate coercion and violence, making it difficult to either contain them or to work out feasible alternatives? Assuming that violence in the various social contexts is not a self-contained, but rather a relational/social phenomenon (across various social entities and institutions such as families, associations, corporations, nations, states, religions), is there any social purpose of violence, and is there any productive alternative to violence? Is violence a form of communication, and are there substitutes in terms of strategies of communication that might non-repressively reduce the recourse to violence?

Southeastern Europe has seen more than its share of violence, as well as of anti-violence ideology over the past several decades, propagated both by the states and governments and by civil society organizations and various sections of the society. The region has seen the adoption and implementation of various EU laws and policies to a far greater and more extreme level than they were implemented in their countries of origin. The trend is partly a symptom of identity crisis and identity insecurity, where policies are designed to curtail all kinds of violence in society, shifting power towards every increasing prerogatives of the administration. Every instance of violence tends to be interpreted as a systematic social degeneration, which needs to be uprooted by draconian control and repressive policies. The results include an extremely powerful police force and state institutions with sweeping authority over individual citizens, and an increasing apathy and defensiveness by the ordinary people. Thus the study of violence as well as anti-violence policy addresses a core issue for the quality of life in Southeastern Europe.

“Critique of Violence Now” will:

  • Provide a framework for exchange of views and insights among activists and academics on following topics: Political Violence, Administrative Violence, Legal Violence, Domestic Violence, Collective Violence in the regional and global context, Countering (discourses of) violence through social engagement, Social inequalities and neoliberal conquest of state and society;
  • Inspire and build capacity of participants through stimulating topical and theoretical input by renowned academics, creating opportunities for building networks and joint cooperation actions in the field;
  • Provide workspaces for the participants to discuss and work on short papers (app. 3 pages) dedicated to four major clusters: “Political Violence: Revisited”; “Administrative Violence: Migration”; “Ethnicized and Racialised Violence”; “Deconstructing Misogyny and Patriarchy”. Papers (in English) would be further refined immediately after the Summer School and published in a volume edited by the Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory University of Belgrade.

Technical information and application procedure:

The official language of the Summer School is English.

The Program Committee of the 2018 CAS SEE Summer School will select the presenters based on the submitted abstracts responding to four Clusters:

  • “Political Violence: Revisited”;
  • “Administrative Violence: Migration”;
  • “Ethnicized and Racialized Violence”;
  • “Deconstructing Misogyny and Patriarchy”

We kindly ask you to put the following title in your email subject: ‘Name: title of the paper’. The complete application should be submitted in.doc or .docx format, and must contain: the title of the presentation, an abstract of up to 200 words, key words and a short biography in English.

Summer School applications should be sent only via e-mail to the following address: cas@cas.uniri.hr

Deadline for abstracts is 31st March 2018.

It is expected that the participants submit their full papers before 1st June 2018.

2018 CAS SEE Summer School Full Registration Fee is 125 Euros; Student Registration Fee is 50 Euros.

Payment is due before 1st June 2018.

The Summer School hosts offer reception and the ticket entrance for the theatre performance on June 18th in the evening, and provide refreshments throughout the duration of the Summer School program.

Important dates:

Application deadline: 31st March 2018

Notification of acceptance: 30th April 2018

2018 CAS SEE Summer School dates: 18th–22nd June 2018

Program Committee:

Astrid Deuber-Mankowsky; Ruhr University Bochum

Petar Bojanic; IFDT University of Belgrade / CAS SEE University of Rijeka

Vedran Dzihic; oiip / CAS SEE University of Rijeka

Manuela Bojadzijev; Humboldt University

Sanja Bojanic; CAS SEE/CWS, University of Rijeka

Adriana Zaharijevic; IFDT, University of Belgrade

Gazela Pudar Drasko; IFDT, University of Belgrade

Organization Board:

Mónica Cano Abadía, Kristina Smoljanovic (CAS SEE University of Rijeka)

For information on the time schedule, organization and future events, please follow us at the official website and the Facebook page.

If any further details are needed, please contact us at: cas@cas.uniri.hr

Call for Applications: “Transitional Justice & Memory Politics” Summer School

Venue: Cres, Croatia

Date: July 1-12, 2018

How to apply?

Applications have started for the 2018 edition of the Cres  Summer School on Transitional Justice and the Politics of Memory, a unique,  two-week immersion into how diverse societies around the world deal with past abuses and conflicts. The Cres Summer School offers participants a timely, intensive and multidisciplinary immersion in topics such as human rights, war crimes trials, cultural memory, and processes of post-conflict reconciliation in diverse regions of the world. It includes lectures, workshops, site visits and films focusing on the politics of memory and transitional justice. Lecturers include an  all-star cast of scholars and practitioners  in transitional justice from around the world.

The summer school hosts an international group of students from around the world (the 2017 program included participants from South Africa, Brazil, South Korea, Europe and the U.S.). The students have the unparalleled opportunity to engage with a diverse group of peers. They gain ideas and build networks that inspire research, theses, study abroad programs, and post-graduation careers.

For more information check out the official website, Twitter (@CresTJSummer) or Facebook page. 

Get program details here.