Rules without Words

Call for Papers: “Rules without Words: Inquiries into Non-linguistic Normativities”

Special Issue of the journal Phenomenology and Mind

Deadline for paper submission: March 13th, 2019
The issue will be published by December 2019

Call for Papers:

In the common thinking, rules are often considered linguistic entities. However, forms of normativity not necessarily connected with verbal or written language emerge in the social reality. A number of normative phenomena (e.g. folk law, customs, pictorial law, graphic rules, hostile architecture, animal societies) widely described in the literature do not seem to involve the use of words. Indeed, apparently, in these cases, rules have non-lexical nature.

Phenomenology and Mind invites submissions for a special issue dedicated to “Rules without Words: Inquiries into Non-linguistic Normativities”. This special issue aims to bring together researchers from all around the world who focus on non-linguistic rules from different philosophical perspectives: social philosophy, philosophy of law and jurisprudence, epistemology, political philosophy, philosophy of language, media studies, philosophy of architecture, philosophy of design, performance studies, ethology, cognitive science and social psychology, gender studies.

The main purpose of this special issue is to provide a critical overview of some of the most

interesting topics and methodologies from the current philosophical debate, focusing on (but not limited to) the following issues:

  1. Ontology of non-linguistic rules
  • What are the distinctive ontological features of non-linguistic rules?
  • What are the relations between non-linguistic rules and social reality?
  • Are non-linguistic rules essentially connected to human societies or do they regulate the social life of some non-human members of the animal kingdom?
  1. Epistemology of non-linguistic rules
  • What are the distinctive epistemic features of non-linguistic rules?
  • What are the cognitive and psychological aspects of non-linguistic rules?
  • How is it possible to understand a non-linguistic rule?
  • Is it possible to have a normative experience independently from language?
  1. Deontology of non-linguistic rules
  • Do non-linguistic rules contribute to the development or the maintenance of traditional and new social inequalities?
  • What are the seminal cases of non-linguistic rules in disseminating or imposing political and social values and habits?
  • How can non-linguistic rules promote the social good?
  • How do architecture and design shape social reality through the creation of tacit normative social constraints?

Phenomenology and Mind is the Journal of the Faculty of Philosophy of San Raffaele University (Milan). It was founded in 2011 and since then has hosted works of outstanding philosophers such as Lynne Baker, Thomas Fuchs, Anna Elisabetta Galeotti, Shaun Gallagher, Margaret Gilbert, Jürgen Habermas, Edward Harcourt, Robin Jeshion, Dieter Lohmar, Michael Pauen, John Searle, Nadia Urbinati, and many others. The journal is anonymously peer-reviewed and open-access. We are committed to publishing papers of high academic quality and making them accessible to a wide audience. Submissions from underrepresented groups in philosophy are particularly encouraged.

Confirmed Invited Authors:

Amedeo Giovanni Conte (University of Pavia)

Giuseppe Lorini (University of Cagliari)

Patrick Maynard (University of Western Ontario)

Valeria Bucchetti and Francesca Casnati (Politecnico di Milano, Design Department)

Guest Editors:

Sanja Bojanić (University of Rijeka, Academy of Applied Arts Rijeka, Center for Advanced Studies – Southeastern Europe)

Olimpia Loddo (University of Cagliari)

Marko-Luka Zubčić (University of Rijeka, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences Rijeka, Center for Advanced Studies – Southeastern Europe)

Submission Guidelines

Submissions must be prepared for double blind review. Manuscripts – in .doc format – should not contain any identifying information and they cannot exceed 6000 words (references included). Moreover, they must contain:

– An abstract of no more than 150 words,

– The section to which the author(s) wants to contribute to;

– 4/5 keywords.

All manuscripts must be in English.

For stylistic details, see: http://www.fupress.net/public/journals/60/pam_guidelines.pdf;

Submissions should be sent via the Phenomenology and Mind website

(http://www.fupress.net/index.php/pam) by the 13th of March, 2019.

The author should register here and then log in to submit her paper. Please, be sure to register as author in order to submit your paper (flag the option “Author” in your Profile), and to indicate your current affiliation (if applicable).

For information, please contact: phenomenologyandmind@unisr.it

Important dates:

Deadline for submissions: March 13th, 2019 

Notification of acceptance: May 13th, 2019

Publication of the issue: December, 2019

Rules without Words #2

The seventh, Summer 2018, generation of CAS SEE Fellows continues investigations into non-verbal normativity. This year’s seminar is reflective of the diversity of themes which may gather under the umbrella of “rules without words”, with Fellows tackling issues of requiredness, unlearning and Laibach. The language of the lectures and the discussion is English. The seminar is open to public. Discussants and audience members from all professions are invited.

 Venue: DeltaLab (address: Delta 5, HR 51000, Rijeka)

◌ PROGRAM ◌

17.00 | Francesca Forlè: “ Requiredness in a World of Facts”
17.30 | Daniela Brasil: “Unlearning How to Behave: Exercises of civic disobedience in and
outside the classroom”
18.00 | Polona Sitar: “The Laibach Phenomenon: Ideology, Art and Popular Music”

Francesca Forlè: “Requiredness in a World of Facts”

In her 2015 paper on value realism, De Monticelli presents an everyday-life case of non-verbal normativity (De Monticelli 2015, 85-86). While visiting Berlin, she ended up in a small park called Koppenplatz, in the heart of Mitte. There was a green table there, with two chairs nearby: the all setting seemed to be a piece of public furniture provided by the city. One of the two chairs was upside down. The author was strikingly deluded when she tried to put this chair in the upright position: the chair could not be turned over because it was fixed on the soil. Indeed, the table and chairs were a work of art, properly a memorial of the war and the Nazi tragedy: that small disorder in that setup was a symbol of a violated home and the violated everyday life caused by the war. For our purposes, the author’s delusion is interesting because it spread out of the experience of something that ought to – or required to – be put in order. The upside down chair of that setup in Koppenplatz required be putting in the right position, and motivated the author to act appropriately. What is that requiredness-trait that emerges from some objects in the world and appears to be somehow normative for the subject facing it? In this talk, I will present Köhler’s notion of requiredness, and how it accounts for normative (non-linguistic) properties in a world of facts.

Daniela Brasil: “Unlearning How to Behave: Exercises of Civic Disobedience in and Outside the Classroom”

Focusing on adult education, unlearning is proposed simultaneously as a pedagogical, artistic and social practice. It uses small gestures as tools to trigger sensitive experiences while playfully and critically intervening in the world. This paper examines the methods used in selected classes I have facilitated in the Institute of Contemporary Art of the Gra University of Technology in Austria for the past five years. Specifically, the classes proposed exercises that open up critical reflections on the social impact of our (in)visible behaviors, choices and attitudes, by inciting students to make gestures that matter: gestures that disrupted normativity implicit in Austrian public spaces. This study brings to the foreground one course entitled “Creleisure: Towards Another Economy of Creativity and Time”, which drew on Hélio Oiticica’s claim from the early 1970s to merge creativity with pleasure and leisure. Creleisure became a motto to de-naturalize normative behaviors and biased worldviews overseen by students in their daily lives, while suggesting that collective joy and playfulness can be meaningful tools for (un)learning practices: inside and outside the classroom.

Polona Sitar: “The Laibach Phenomenon: Ideology, Art and Popular Music”

In November 1980 a poster appeared on the walls of the Slovenian mining town of Trbovlje. All that it contained was a black cross and the name Laibach. With the poster once anonymous musician and art group was noticed for the first time. The name of the group appeared to the Yugoslav authorities disputable at that time as it contained a fascist connotation – the name Laibach was a German name for the capital of Slovenia (Ljubljana) during their occupation in the WW2. The persecution reached its peak in 1983, when the Union of the Socialist Workers Party in Ljubljana banned the group from using the name. Due to the historically disputable name Laibach, the appearance of members of the group in which people saw the Nazis and because of their performance, that resembled the content of political propaganda instead of a regular rock concert, the audience saw the destroyer of the state order in the group. With the music performed by Laibach, the political system and the popular culture are being questioned on the basis of the fusion of popular music and political ideology (with the provocative use of symbols and the aesthetics of totalitarian ideologies). Although Laibach is primarily a music group, its members are concerned with its graphic design and scenography, in the past they were publishing philosophical and theoretical texts, worked with the theater and visual/film art etc. While focusing on the non-verbal normativity through the perspective of studying ideologies articulated through popular music and propagated in artistic practices, this contribution will try to answer the question why the band Laibach breeds anxiety in the listeners, where this anxiety originates from, what its purpose is and what is the meaning of the presence of Laibach in the core of popular culture today.


Event visuals are made by Nataša Janković.

RULES WITHOUT WORDS

An Interdisciplinary Seminar on Non-Verbal Normativity

Date and Venue: February 8, 2018 at Društvo arhitekata Rijeka (DAR)

Organization: CAS SEE & DAR

Non-verbal normativity surrounds us. In design and architecture practices, the visual communication and the built environment transmit rules and shape behaviour in a variety of, arguably, understudied ways. Signalization, political and lifestyle propaganda in various media, nudging images, technical drawings of city plans, ideologies articulated through architectural choices and propagated through artistic practices – are among the most prolific bearers of norms in the society.

This seminar gathers a number of Autumn 2017 CAS SEE Fellows investigating the non-verbal normativities in a variety of approaches and disciplines and the practitioners of design and architecture to open the discussion about the nature, relevance and effects of the “rules without words” in the contemporary normative landscape, where climate change is reframing the discussions on globalization, the illiberal governments are slowly and persistently changing the fundamentals of the discourse on governance and freedom, and the vast digital realm floods the international social life with innovations in social coordination as well as informational and affective strategies of uncontrollable quality and intent.


◌ PROGRAM ◌

17.00 | Olimpia Giuliana Loddo and Davide Pisu: The Architect’s Normative Drawings

17.30 | Carlo Burelli: Art, Power and Propaganda: Lessons from the Roman Empire

17.50 | Mónica Cano Abadía: The Non-Verbal Normativity of Gender Performativity

18.10 | Discussion

18.40 | Davide Pala: A Moral Framework for Assessing Hostile Architecture

19.00 | Milorad Kapetanović: Regulation of Informal Construction in Rijeka in the Anticipation of European Capital of Culture Rijeka

19.20 | Nataša Janković: Architectural terRI[s]tories: Mapping the Process of City Transformation.

19.40 | Gerrit Wegener: Johnnie meets Jackie in Rijeka. In between the lines of Normativity and Individuality

20.00 | Discussion