Rijeka

Summer School of Innovative Interpretation of Industrial Heritage

Summer School of Innovative Interpretation of Industrial Heritage, organized by Center for Industrial Heritage and Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe of University of Rijeka in cooperation with Culture Hub Croatia and European Heritage Volunteers, started on Monday, 17th of September with the volunteers’ visit to the City of Rijeka, where they were welcomed by Deputy Mayor Marko Filipović, Ivan Šarar, Head of the Department of Culture at the City of Rijeka and Ms Helga Večerinović, expert associate for product development at the City of Rijeka Turist Board.

During the two weeks long Summer School, the students from Croatia, China, Russia, Chile, Hungary, Germany, Italy and Taiwan investigated and researched the possibilities of the innovative interpretation of the school ship „Galeb“ and the Sugar Refinery, two representative objects of Rijeka’s industrial heritage, which are currently in the process of renovation. The mentioned reception at the City of Rijeka was also an opportunity for a short presentation of the project “Touristic Valorisation of Representative Monuments of Rijeka’s Industrial Heritage”, funded by the European Regional Development Fund – Operational Program “Competitiveness and Cohesion”. The Croatia’s Ministry of Regional Development and the EU funds provided substantial amount of 68.891.606,18 kuna for the project’s development, with the total worth of the project of 81.339.442,05 kuna.

On Tuesday, 18th of September, Summer School program continued in Delta Lab, with a Conference on the Interpretation of Industrial Heritage, with experts from the field of cultural and industrial heritage valorisation and interpretation, including doc. dr. sc. Darko Babić (University of Zagreb, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Department of Information and Communication Sciences) co-founder of the “Interpret Croatia” Association, who provided a remarkable and detailed overview of the interpretation theory, focusing on the need of creating an emotional link between the audiences and the (information regarding) the heritage, and focusing on interpretation as a creative informal education and, moreover, the importance of understanding that heritage comes into being by being interpreted. He concluded that the ideal situation is that in which the local communities recognize their heritage and know what they want to gain from it and then seek the experts to tell its story.

The program continued with lectures and workshop with the „Muses“: Dragana Lucija Ratković Aydemir and Ivana Jagic Boljat who emphasized the importance of good communication and openness in working with the clients and the users of the interpretation, and the pronounced relevance of understanding the needs of the local communities from the very start of interpretation process. The afternoon session continued with lectures and presentations of best practice examples with Jelena Mateševac (Primorje-Gorski Kotar County) presenting the project Cultural-tourist Route “the Routes of the Frankopans”, followed by mr. sc. Vlatko Čakširan (City Museum Sisak) presenting the „Info center of Industrial Heritage – Holland House“. Best practice example with regards to EU projects aimed at promoting co-operation between central European cities, and providing other cities, though their associations, with recommendations on how to improve hidden cultural heritage potentials were presented by Sonja Lukin and Tanja Pavlovic – Flegar (City of Rijeka), with the „Forget Heritage“ project, followed by Luka Rodela (Molekula Association) presenting the re-use center pilot within the same project, providing us with a short „beginners guide“ to heritage management in the context of forlorn industrial factories of Rijeka.

On Wednesday, September 19th, the most important current Rijeka project, Rijeka 2020 – European Capital of Culture was presented by Dorian Celcer, Partnership and Protocol Coordinator at the Rijeka2020 d.o.o.  He provided a showcase of the initial idea, application process, current developments and the seven flagships overview with the goals and legacy of the project, expected after 2020.

On Thursday, the volunteers were greeted by the University of Rijeka representatives, Prof. Sanja Baric, Vice Rector for Studies and Students, and Associate Professor Bojana Ćulum, Department of Education at the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, giving an overview of the University’s policies and strategies aimed at developing and fostering student activism and volunteering. The volunteers also met with the representatives of the Student Council at the University of Rijeka: Margime Hasani, Tea Dimnjašević and Kruno Topolski, followed by a walk around the University Campus.

On Friday, the students worked on the SWOT analysis of the Galeb ship, a week-long task with an agenda of forming innovative interpretation proposals and a final document to be presented after working in situ at the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, in vicinity of the Sugar Refinery administrative building, a magnificent late Baroque palace remained from the former complex, built in 1786 in Rijeka. The building is currently in the process of renovation within the program of the “Touristic Valorisation of Representative Monuments of Rijeka’s Industrial Heritage” project, funded by the European Regional Development Fund – Operational Program “Competitiveness and Cohesion”. Once renovated, in 2020 the Baroque palace will become the new City Museum of Rijeka. The project is managed by the City of Rijeka in partnership with the Rijeka Tourist Board and the University of Rijeka – Center for Industrial Heritage and the CAS SEE.

Over the weekend, the volunteers visited Labin and Raša in Istria, where they had a guided tour and a short lecture on the interesting and somewhat hidden history of coal mining industrial town of Raša. On Monday, the working session continued with the Sugar Refinery analysis at the DeltaLab.

On Tuesday afternoon at Delta Lab the volunteers had another public event in the framework of the International Workshop on Interpretation of Industrial Heritage summer school, they were presenting examples of good practices from all over the world.

On Wednesday, the morning session began with a guided visit to the Sugar Refinery administrative building and then we continued the day with the analysis for the Sugar Refinery interpretation proposals at the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in Rijeka during another public event, the Open Doors Day, which gave the opportunity to welcome guests at the working site of the Museum. The volunteers also visited the opening of the newly built RiHub, a co-working space aimed at hosting the creative industry, Rijeka 2020 d.o.o. offices and freelancers as well as providing a space for versatile educational and creative events.

The final proposal presentation of innovative interpretations by the European Heritage Volunteers is set for Friday, Saturday 28th, starting at 5.00 pm at the Delta Lab (Delta 5) in Rijeka.


Industrial Heritage Interpretation Conference

Center for Industrial Heritage
and Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe at the University of Rijeka
in collaboration with the Culture Hub Croatia and European Heritage Volunteers

invite you to the

“Industrial Heritage Interpretation” Conference

September 18, 2018 at the Delta Lab (Delta 5, 51000 Rijeka)

Photo credits: Museum of the City of Rijeka

09.00 – 14.00 | Morning Session

09.00 – 10:30 | „Introduction to Heritage Interpretation – theoretical basis and principles“, doc. dr. sc. Darko Babić, University of Zagreb, Department of Information and Communication Sciences, Museology and Heritage Management Section, co-founder and president of the association Interpret Croatia

10.30 – 12:00 | „Touristic Valorisation of Industrial Heritage – trends, possibilities, products“, mr. sc. Vlasta Klarić, co-founder and vice-president of the heritage interpretation association – Interpret Croatia

12.00 – 14:30 | „Interpretative Heritage Planning“, lecture and workshop, Dragana Lucija Ratković Aydemir, Muze d.o.o.


15.30 – 18.00 | Afternoon Session

Participating:

Jelena Matešavac, Primorsko – goranska County, project Cultural-touristic route Itineraries of Frankopan

mr. sc. Vlatko Čakširan – Municipal Museum of Sisak, project Info center of industrial heritage – Holland House

Sonja Lukin, Tanja Pavlović- Flegar, the City of Rijeka, project Forget Heritage

Luka Rodela, Molekula association, presentation of the reuse center in the framework of the Forget Heritage project.

Photo credits: Museum of the City of Rijeka

The Summer School of Innovative Industrial Heritage Interpretation is organized by the Center for Industrial Heritage and the Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe at the University of Rijeka in cooperation with the European Heritage Volunteers organization and the Culture Hub Croatia Platform. The Summer School is one of University of Rijeka’s activities, within the program of the “Touristic Valorisation of Representative Monuments of Rijeka’s Industrial Heritage” project, funded by the European Regional Development Fund – Operational Program “Competitiveness and Cohesion”. The Croatia’s Ministry of Regional Development and the EU funds provided substantial amount of 68.891.606,18 kuna for the project’s development with the total worth of the project of 81.339.442,05 kuna. Find more information on the Project at the official website of the Center for Industrial Heritage at the University of Rijeka.

The fourth ICCTP Conference “The Critique of Violence Now”

We are pleased to announce the fourth conference of the International Consortium of Critical Theory Programs (ICCTP) to be held at Rijeka, Croatia on June 16-19, 2018 on the topic of “The Critique of Violence Now”. The conference will take place at the Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe, University of Rijeka, and will be sponsored in conjunction with the Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade, Serbia.

The Consortium is jointly housed at the University of California, Berkeley and Northwestern University with support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The task of the Consortium is to establish an active network of programs, projects, centers and institutes that will expand the global reach and form of critical theory for our time. The Consortium seeks to document, connect, and further the new and varied forms that critical theory has assumed in light of contemporary global challenges, including economic and political challenges to the university as an institution charged with the task of safeguarding and promoting critical thought.

The Consortium is meant to open new institutional links, overcome forms of hemispheric disconnection, and to pursue collaborative forms of interdisciplinary knowledge, guided by questions such as these: What are the current historical and global conditions in which the value of critical thought is challenged? How do we best describe and evaluate the prevailing forms of global power in their regional specificity that shape and constrain our intellectual life as it crosses academic and popular spheres, and how can critical thought rise to the challenge of these new global challenges through effective and thoughtful political engagement? By now, three conferences have been held, in Bologna, São Paulo and Johannesburg, on the topics of the critical tasks of university, the ends of democracy and reflections on memory and political time.

The issue of violence will be the focus of the fourth ICCTP conference, framed by the question, “what is a critique of violence for the present?” Can we have develop a global notion of “critique” without a “critique of violence”? Walter Benjamin asked this question in the early 1920s and he offered his own account of legal violence. Many of the traditional debates about violence and non-violence presumed a common understanding of both terms: we were assumed to know how best to identify violence and how to go about justifying or opposing its use. What challenge does the idea of “legal violence” pose to those traditional debates? And what forms does “legal violence” take now? What is the relation between spectacles of massacre, for instance, and those forms of legal violence, including administrative violence: how are they related, and how are they identified?  Does it matter how we understand regional violence (and how we designate regions) when we seek to answer this question? In addressing the topic “the critique of violence now,” we will be focusing in this meeting on the question of how we might re-appropriate Walter Benjamin’s influential and controversial essay “Critique of Violence” (Zur Kritik der Gewalt) in the context of our present political terrain.

The participants of the fourth conference of the ICCTP, The Critique of Violence Now, are: Petar Bojanić (IFDT/CAS), Judith Butler (UC Berkeley), Marc Crépon (ENS), Astrid Deuber-Mankowsky (Ruhr-Universität Bochum), Başak Ertür (Birkbeck College London), Peter Fenves (Northwestern University), Anne-Lise François (UC Berkeley), Dario Gentili (Roma Tre), Julia Ng (Goldsmiths), Pablo Oyarzún (Universidad de Chile), Massimo Palma (Suor Orsola Napoli), Michelle Ty (Clemson University).

The ICCTP conference will take place in tandem with the Summer School Critique of Violence Now: From Thinking to Acting against Violence (June 18-22).

Conveners

Judith Butler
Principal Investigator, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Grant for an International Consortium of Critical Theory Programs
University of California, Berkeley

Petar Bojanić
Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade
Center for Advanced Studies Southeast Europe, University of Rijeka

Sanja Milutinović Bojanić
Academy of Applied Arts
Center for Advanced Studies Southeast Europe, University of Rijeka

Gazela Pudar Draško
Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade

Adriana Zaharijević
Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade

THE CRITIQUE OF VIOLENCE NOW
June 16-19, 2018

June 16th

5-7 PM

Planning meeting, discussion of existing and future projects.

(Judith Butler, Petar Bojanić)

June 17th

9.30 AM-12.30 PM

Opening paragraph on law and justice, focusing on the means/ends distinction, explicating the meaning of critique for this essay (Peter Fenves)

Paragraphs 2-3: The problem of natural law (Massimo Palma)

Paragraphs 4-6:  “The question of the justification of certain means that constitute violence”: the distinction between legitimate and illegitimate violence; the introduction of legal violence as a problem; violence of the law and violence outside the law (Julia Ng)

2-5 PM

Paragraphs 7-8: Introduction of class struggle and the general strike, its relation to “pure means” and to non-violence; its relation to military law; the introduction to law-making in relation to Sorel’s Reflections on Violence (Marc Crépon)

Paragraphs 9-11: The police, its ghostly presence; transition to the non-contractual character of non-violent resolution, its relation to language and understanding; the relation between parliamentary power and violence; the non-violence as “unalloyed means” or “pure means” (Dario GentiliBaşak Ertür)

June 18th

9.30 AM-12.30 PM

Paragraphs 12-13: Non-violent resolution of conflict; techniques of civil agreement; the prohibition of fraud, “a policy of pure means,” the general strike (Anne-Lise François)

Paragraphs 14-17: Violence imposed by fate, the nonmediate function of violence, transition to mythic violence and the unwritten law and its relation to retribution; fate and the introduction of the mythical; the distinction between mythical and divine violence, the examples of Niobe and Korah (Astrid Deuber-Mankowsky, Michelle Ty)

2-5 PM

Paragraph 18: Divine power and “educative power”; Judaism and the commandment against killing; the doctrine of self-defense; the condition of “man”; the question of sacred life (Judith Butler, Petar Bojanić)

Paragraph 19: The formulation of the critique of violence as the philosophy of its history; breaking the cycle of the dialectical rising and falling of law-making and law-preserving violence. How to name that break, that “attack on law”? The expiatory power of violence; its invisibility; the final speculations on “true war” and “divine violence” (Pablo Oyarzún)

June 19th

10.00 AM -12.00 PM

Informal discussion of ICCTP and future plans for collaboration.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Information on the Participants

 

Petar Bojanić is the director of the Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory (IFDT) at the University of Belgrade, where he has been a fellow since 2005. He directs the Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe (CAS) at the University of Rijeka.

 

Judith Butler is Maxine Elliot Professor in the Department of Comparative Literature and the Program in Critical Theory at the University of California, Berkeley. She served as Founding Director of the Program in Critical Theory. She is the Co-Director of the International Consortium of Critical Theory Programs.

 

Marc Crépon is Professor of Philosophy at the École Normale Supérieure, Paris, and the Chair of the Philosophy Department. He is also Research Director at the National Scientific Research Center CNRS, (Husserl Archives).

 

Astrid Deuber-Mankowsky is Professor of Media and Gender Studies at the Ruhr-University in Bochum. She is an external affiliate of the Centre for Philosophy and Critical Thought at Goldsmiths, University of London.

 

Başak Ertür is Lecturer in Law and Co-Director of the Centre for Law and the Humanities at the School of Law at Birkbeck, University of London.

 

Peter Fenves is Professor of Literature, German and Comparative Literature at Northwestern University. He has taught at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Johns Hopkins, Princeton and Harvard Universities.

 

Anne-Lise François is Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of California, Berkeley.

 

Dario Gentili is Associate Professor of Moral Philosophy in the Department of Philosophy, Communication and Performing Arts at the University of Roma Tre.

Gentili is a board member of the Associazione Italiana Walter Benjamin (AWB).

 

Julia Ng is Co-Director of the Centre for Philosophy and Critical Thought. She co-chairs the Walter Benjamin London Research Network. She is also Research Associate of the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures at Harvard University.

 

Pablo Oyarzún is Professor of Philosophy and Aesthetics and Director of the Bicentennial Initiative at the University of Chile. He is also director of the Central Research Seminar at the Art Institute of the Catholic University of Valparaíso. Oyarzún has also been a member of the Superior Council of the National Fund of Science and Technology (FONDECYT).

 

Massimo Palma is Assistant Researcher of Philosophy at the Suor Orsola Benincasa University in Naples, Italy.

 

Michelle Ty is Assistant Professor in the Department of English at Clemson University and a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute for Cultural Inquiry in Berlin. She is currently writing a book about Walter Benjamin’s solidarity with all that is abjected from the category of the human.

RULES WITHOUT WORDS

An Interdisciplinary Seminar on Non-Verbal Normativity

Date and Venue: February 8, 2018 at Društvo arhitekata Rijeka (DAR)

Organization: CAS SEE & DAR

Non-verbal normativity surrounds us. In design and architecture practices, the visual communication and the built environment transmit rules and shape behaviour in a variety of, arguably, understudied ways. Signalization, political and lifestyle propaganda in various media, nudging images, technical drawings of city plans, ideologies articulated through architectural choices and propagated through artistic practices – are among the most prolific bearers of norms in the society.

This seminar gathers a number of Autumn 2017 CAS SEE Fellows investigating the non-verbal normativities in a variety of approaches and disciplines and the practitioners of design and architecture to open the discussion about the nature, relevance and effects of the “rules without words” in the contemporary normative landscape, where climate change is reframing the discussions on globalization, the illiberal governments are slowly and persistently changing the fundamentals of the discourse on governance and freedom, and the vast digital realm floods the international social life with innovations in social coordination as well as informational and affective strategies of uncontrollable quality and intent.


◌ PROGRAM ◌

17.00 | Olimpia Giuliana Loddo and Davide Pisu: The Architect’s Normative Drawings

17.30 | Carlo Burelli: Art, Power and Propaganda: Lessons from the Roman Empire

17.50 | Mónica Cano Abadía: The Non-Verbal Normativity of Gender Performativity

18.10 | Discussion

18.40 | Davide Pala: A Moral Framework for Assessing Hostile Architecture

19.00 | Milorad Kapetanović: Regulation of Informal Construction in Rijeka in the Anticipation of European Capital of Culture Rijeka

19.20 | Nataša Janković: Architectural terRI[s]tories: Mapping the Process of City Transformation.

19.40 | Gerrit Wegener: Johnnie meets Jackie in Rijeka. In between the lines of Normativity and Individuality

20.00 | Discussion

MILORAD KAPETANOVIC

Legalising informal construction in Rijeka

“This presentation is an extension of the original research proposal which dealt with individual informal construction and its legalization process in the light of European Capital of Culture. Through it, I aimed to get better insight in Rijeka as a case of relatively high construction regulation, in historical terms and compared to the rest of former Yugoslavia. It also seemed convenient, considering the sensitivity of the European Capital of Culture project and potential investments it would attract, which are less state-dependent compared to large sports events. In particular, I was interested to observe whether will Rijeka 2020 affect finalization of legalization process, if its larger development projects will create space for more regulation or will cause new problems. However, in the presentation, I detour from this narrow focus, due to several conclusions I derived from initial field research. ECC project is too specific and developing too slowly to create visible results in five months of the fellowship and activities planned within ECC project are happening slower than I expected. But more importantly, particular dynamics of space regulation appear to be unaffected by the ECC, but only continued by historical relationship and failures/successes of legalization.

I found necessary to expand the research question to this relationship. What is a local history of legalization (individual informal construction regulation)? How is this process specific to Rijeka? What is given in this process (what developmental projects are presented as universal objectives with their values and hegemonies? Which actors are implementing/resisting these projects and what is their politics?
Local professionals frame legalization as unilateral, universal process. It is not mere space regulation, setting objectively existing construction in understandable terms (registries and databases) but also a highly normative implementing process. Legalisation advocators and the critique of informal construction often present the phenomenon in a specific mixture of orientalism (Balkanism), modernization and distinction. Even activists advocating better public space management and arguing re-evaluation of socialist modernism or against neoliberal thefts in large construction developments see individual construction as a problem.

Without arguing for or against this process, it is necessary to take a broader perspective and examine social dynamics of space governance and management; to see how the history of this process produced legitimization of power relationships of modernizers and those to be regulated (modernized). In the legalization process, working-class culture and heritage of Rijeka city are undermined and taken for granted. Further, I demonstrate how even socialist projects which indeed did plan and involve workers, deny workers voices. In legalization process, working-class culture is systematically delegitimized and rendered invisible in public space behind a heritage of historicist, imperial or modernist projects.”


Mišo Kapetanović holds a PhD in Balkan Studies from the University of Ljubljana. He studied Philosophy and Sociology at the University of Banja Luka and received a Joint Master degree in Global History and Global Studies from the University of Vienna and the University of Leipzig. His doctoral research dealt with the visual language of contemporary informal construction (title: “Roadside Architecture in Bosnia and Herzegovina Between Consumerism and Vernacularity”). He has written on representations in contemporary pornography, queer music experiences in the Balkans, and the history of urban planning in socialist Yugoslavia. Before Rijeka he was a research fellow at the Centre for Southeast European Studies at the University of Graz and worked as a researcher on a project “Documenting Human Losses in Croatia 1991–1995” for Croatian NGO Documenta – Center for Dealing with the Past.

Equality and Citizenship IV – Summer School Rijeka 2017.

 

Venue: Department of Philosophy, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Rijeka, Campus, Sveučilišna avenija 4, Room 401

program

July  3rd, 2017

9.00 – 9.15 /

Welcoming address by the members of the Organization board, the academic and the public authorities

Tom Douglas Symposium

9.15 – 10.45 /

Tom Douglas – The ‘Mere Substitution’ Defence of Nudging and Its Implications for Neurointerventions

10.45 – 11.15 Coffee break

11.15 – 12.15

John McMillan – Neuro-interventions, Diagnosis and Coercion: What are the Limits of Therapy?

12.15 – 13.05

Elvio Baccarini – Moral Bioenhancement of Criminal Offenders

13.05 – 14.30 Lunch

14.30 – 15.20

Viktor Ivanković – Reassessing ‘Mere Substitution’ and Its Implications to Autonomy

15.30 – 16.20

Norbert Paulo – Between Nudging and Manipulating

16.20 – 16.40 Coffee break

16.40– 17.30

Filip Čeč- Moral Bioenhancement and the Problem of Diminished Freedom

July 4th, 2017

10.00 – 10.50

Tomislav Miletić – Biomoral Enhancement – Wherein Lies the Focus? Ruminations on the Relation Between Biology and Morality

11.00 – 11.50

Megan Foster – Pinning Down the ‘Moral’ in Moral Enhancement

12.00 – 12.20 Coffee break

12.20 – 13.10

Zlata Božac, Viktor Ivanković – Nudging and Moral Enhancement

13.10 – 15.00 Lunch

Richard Arneson Symposium

15.00 – 16.30

Scientific Colloquium of University of Rijeka: Richard Arneson – Deservingness in Distributive Justice Theory

16.30 – 16.50 Coffee break

16.50 – 17.40

Ivan Cerovac – Elitism, Political Legitimacy and Plural Voting

July 5th, 2017

10.00 – 10.50

Katarina Pitasse Fragoso – Identifying the Least Advantaged: A Debate on Metrics Between Primary Goods and Capabilities

11.00 – 11.50

Zlata Božac – Self-Ownership and Human Dignity

11.50 – 12.10 Coffee break

12.10 – 13.00

Iris Vidmar – Political Fiction- Critical Insights from Richard Arneson

13.10 – 14.00

Nicolas Brando –  Defining A Moral Person: The Boundaries Between Childhood and Adulthood

14.00 – 15.30 Lunch 

15.30 – 16.20

Elvio Baccarini – Arneson and Public Reason

19.00 – 20.30 (Filodrammatica) – Prof. Richard Arneson – Deservingness in Just Warfare Theory

July 6th, 2017

Leif Wenar Symposium

10.00 – 11.30

Leif Wenar – Unity Theory

11.30 – 11.50 Coffee break

11.50 – 12.40

Siba Harb – Distributing Responsibility

12.40 – 13.30

Neven Petrović – Left Libertarianism and Property

13.30 – 15.30 Lunch

19.00 – 20.30 (Opatija Public Lecture) Prof. Leif Wenar- Blood Oil

July 7th, 2017

10.00 – 10.50

Dijana Eraković – G.A. Cohen’s Concept of Liberty Assessed Through the Classical Liberty Theory of H. Steiner, C. Taylor and D. Miller

11.00 – 11.50

Ivan Mladenović – Justice, Legitimacy and International Relations: On the Unity of Rawls’s Political Theory

11.50 – 13.30 Lunch 

13.30 – 14.20

Ana Matan – Are Liberal Peoples More Peaceful Than Non-liberal Peoples, and Why?

14.30 – 15.20

Elvio Baccarini, Nebojša Zelič – Why Burdens of Judgement

15.20 Closing of the Summer School

“THE NEW LEFT” SUMMER SCHOOL

Organizers: FES DIALOGUE SOE & CAS SEE

Venue: Rijeka University Campus, Faculty for the Humanities and Social Sciences,
Sveučilišna avenija 4, IV Floor; Room 401, Rijeka

Dates: June 11th – 17th 2017

Rationale and Background for the Summer School:

The region of Southeast Europe is facing significant political and economic challenges which creates worrying distrust in the very basics and foundations of politics and institutions. As a result, a new wave of protest movements has been emerging all over the region. All countries experienced mass mobilizations: anti-government and student protests, workers’ strikes in privatized companies etc. Many of those protests are genuine democratic movements and challenge the current narrative of political fatigue. The FES Dialogue SOE has been actively engaging with these new societal actors through a series of activist fora. At the same time the CAS SEE has been investing resources in thinking about the current crisis of democracy in the region and beyond while providing necessary theoretical impetus for re-thinking democracy and political action.

In the activist fora, the primary goal was to forge new connections towards the re-thinking and consolidation of the Southeast European Left. The activist fora have aimed at developing a participatory means of translating civic action into an overarching platform that is based on positions identified as the joint fault-lines by the activists from various movements and struggles across Southeast Europe. From the activist fora the idea emerged to elevate the process towards a more concrete dimension by streamlining various inputs from activists as well as partnering organisations like CAS SEE or European Alternatives into a comprehensive a political platform labelled the Democratic Left ‘18 (#DL18). Herein lies the ultimate goal to establish a politically and ideologically relevant platform to be used by Left actors from both established political and grassroots backgrounds, with the aim of consolidating the Left in Southeast Europe.

Objectives of the Summer School:

The Summer School “The NEW LEFT” is envisioned as a consolidation effort of the inputs created so far in the process. The Summer School will:

  • provide a framework for exchanging views and insights among activists and academics on the four thematic clusters of the #DL18 platform, namely on Democracy, Economy, Resources, and Social State in a regional context.
  • provide workspaces for the participants to discuss and refine their position papers with advice from academic experts.
  • validate and peer-review #DL18 position papers, identify room for improvement with a view to developing a consistent political platform under the guidance of academic experts.
  • inspire and build capacity of participants through stimulating topical and theoretical inputs by renowned academics.
What is left? How to think left? Opening exchange

 

What is left? How to think left? Opening exchange by Petar Bojanic

 

Programme Board of the summer school:

Felix Henkel, FES Dialogue Southeast Europe

Sanja Bojanic, CAS SEE/CWS, University of Rijeka

Petar Bojanic, IFDT, University of Belgrade

Vedran Dzihic, oiip / CAS SEE

Max Brändle, FES Regional Office for Croatia and Slovenia

Organization Board:

Gazela Pudar Draško, IFDT, University of Belgrade (gazela.pudar@instifdt.bg.ac.rs)

Denis Piplaš, FES Dialogue Southeast Europe (denis.piplas@fes-soe.org)

Emin Eminagić, FES Dialogue Southeast Europe (emin.eminagic@fes-soe.org)

Blanka Smoljan, FES Regional Office for Croatia and Slovenia (blanka.smoljan@fes.hr)

Andrea Mešanović, University of Rijeka (andrea.mesanovic@gmail.com)

Kristina Smoljanovic, University of Rijeka (ksmoljanovic@gmail.com)

 

 

SOCIAL ONTOLOGY SYMPOSIUM

19th Edition of the International Conference 

Contemporary Philosophical Issues

Date: May 22-23, 2017

Conference Venue: Faculty for Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Rijeka, Campus, Sveučilišna avenija 4, 51000 Rijeka

Organizer: Department of Philosophy, Faculty for Humanities and Social Sciences; Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe, University of Rijeka; Croatian Society for Analytic Philosophy, PhD programme “Contemporaneity and Philosophy”; LabOnt, University of Torino; Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade

Monday, May 22nd 2017
Plenary session (Room: 006)
09.00 –  09:30 Registration
09:30 – 10:00 Opening of the conference:

Snježana Prijić- Samaržija, chancellor of the University of Rijeka

Petar Bojanić, Director of the Center of  Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe, IFDT Belgrade University

Chairperson: Nenad Miščević
10:00 –11:00 John Searle

The Structure of Human Society

Chairperson: Sanja Bojanić
11:10 – 12:40 John Searle and Maurizio Ferraris

The Color of Money

13:00 – 14:30 Lunch break

 

Monday, May 22nd 2017
  TOPICS FROM JOHN SEARLE

Session A (room 401)

TOPICS FROM JOHN SEARLE

Session B (room 402)

Chairperson: Iris Vidmar Chairperson: Filip Čeč
14:30 – 15:15 Jennifer Hudin

Can Status Functions Be Discovered?

Tomoyuki Yamada

Formalizing Status Functions of Illocutionary Acts

15:20 – 16:05 Benedikt Perak

Emergence of the Social Reality in the Ontological Model of Lexical Concepts and Constructions

Abigail Klassen

On the Multitude of Kinds of Social Kinds: Problematizing John R. Searle’s Institutional and Non-institutional Social Kinds

16:05 – 16:20 Coffee break Coffee break
Chairperson: Ana Gavran Miloš Chairperson: Andrea Mešanović
16:20 – 17:05 Paolo de Lucia

Dynamics of Normative Impossibility

Bojan Borstner

Metaphysics of Sociality

17:10 – 17:55 Michael Vlerick

Explaining Religion: Introducing an Institutional Approach

Lorenzo Passerini Glazel

Impossible Tokens, Necessary Types

17:55 – 18:10 Coffee break Coffee break
Chairperson: Miljana Milojević Chairperson: Ivan Cerovac
18:10 – 18:55 Giuseppe Lorini

Constitutive Rules and Meta-institutional Concepts

Boran Berčić

Are Nations Social Constructs?

19:00 – 19:45 Zvonimir Šikić

Why do Laws Succeed or do not Succeed?

Edoardo Fregonese

Imposing Function through Document. The Case of an Urban Plan: Plano Tomorrow in Plano (TX)

    20:30 Conference dinner

 

Tuesday, May 23rd 2017
STUDENT WORKSHOPS WITH JOHN SEARLE AND JENNIFER HUDIN

Social ontology meets collective epistemology

Room 006

09:00 –  10:30 Opening remarks: Nenad Smokrović, director of the PhD programme Philosophy and Contemporaneity

John Searle, Jennifer Hudin

Moderator: Snježana Prijić-Samaržija

Matija Lukač: Joint Commitment and Collective  Intentionality – Starting Point and Quality  Criterion

Marko Luka Zubčić: Social Ontology, Social Epistemology and Inferential Individualism

Leonard Pektor: Stoic Epistemic Virtues of Groups – Can there be an Unproblematic Direct Transfer from Individuals to Groups?

Denis Paušić: Is Wide Science a Group that Knows?

10:20 – 10:30 Coffee break
10:30 – 11:05 Moderator: Nenad Smokrović

David Grčki: How Bad is the “Bad Argument”

Aleksandar Šušnjar: Some Reflections on Searle’s View on the Connection between Language and Institution

Kristina Lekić: Group-mind and autism: Can we Talk about the Cognition of the Group of Autistic Persons?

 

Tuesday, May 23rd 2017
  TOPICS FROM JOHN SEARLE

Session A (room 401)

VARIA

Session B (room 402)

Chairperson: Iris Vidmar Chairperson:  Neven Petrović
11:10 – 11:55 Guglielmo Feis

Some (Alternative?) Facts for Searlean Social Ontology

Miljana Milojevic

Extended Mind and Personal Identity

12:00 – 12:45 Alice Borghi

Groups and Populism: a Case Study on Searlean Deontic Powers

Iva Bubalo

Semantics in Computational Cognition?

12:50 – 14:00 Lunch break

 

Tuesday, May 23rd 2017
  TOPICS FROM JOHN SEARLE

Session A (room 401)

VARIA

Session B (room 402)

Chairperson:  Nebojša Zelič Chairperson: Boran Berčić
14:15 – 15:00 Imke Maessen

Ordinary Citizens as the Source of Legal Validity

Danilo Šuster

On the Limits of Argumentation

 

15:05 – 15:50 Maria Matuszkiewicz

An Argument for a Minimal Mental Internalism

Nenad Smokrović

A Real Nature of Argumentation: Individual or Social?

15:50 – 16:00 Coffee break Coffee break
Chairperson: Ivan Cerovac Chairperson: Boran Berčić
16:00 – 16:45 Matjaž Potrč

Objectivity of the Brain in a Vat

Olga Markač

Analogical Reasoning

 

 

SEMINAR WITH ROBERT D. KAPLAN 

Robert D. Kaplan visited Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe on April 21, 2017 and gave a talk about how technology is making geography and geopolitics smaller, more anxious and claustrophobic, so that all of Eurasia is coming together as a single conflict system, even while Europe divides from within. Precisely because globalization leads to integration, it also leads to increased interactions across regions and this intensifies conflict and instability. Kaplan also reflected on the European crisis, in all its aspects, with thoughts and questions about how it looks from the viewpoint of Rijeka, Central Europe, and the former Yugoslavia. Robert D. Kaplan was joined in discussion with Giacomo Scotti, Vanni d’Alessio and Ervin Dubrović.


Robert D. Kaplan is the bestselling author of seventeen books on foreign affairs and travel translated into many languages, including Earning the Rockies, In Europe’s Shadow, Asia’s Cauldron, The Revenge of Geography, Monsoon, The Coming Anarchy, and Balkan Ghosts.
He is a senior fellow at the Center for a New American Security and a senior advisor at Eurasia Group. For three decades he reported on foreign affairs for The Atlantic. He held the national security chair at the United States Naval Academy and was a member of the Pentagon’s Defense Policy Board. Foreign Policy magazine twice named him one of the world’s “Top 100 Global Thinkers.”

 

ANTON MARKOČ

Are There Genuine Reasons Against Intending Harm?
  “Are bad intentions wrongs per se? In other words, are there normative reasons against intending harm and other bad effects which are not derived from reasons against harming or bringing those effects?
The defenders of the Doctrine of Double Effect and all those who subscribe to the thesis that intentions are non-derivatively relevant to the moral permissibility of actions, must answer these questions affirmatively. For there to be a genuine deontological constraint against intending harm, reasons against intending harm must be reasons per se.
In this talk, I evaluate and find wanting three kinds of theoretical justifications of reasons against intending harm as reasons per se: agent-centered, victim-centered, and impersonal. They state, respectively, that bad intentions are wrongs because they are bad for the agent, or for the victim, or because they are bad, period.
I conclude that although the failure of these justifications is not a decisive evidence to think that there are no genuine reasons against intending harm, it is a good enough evidence to raise serious doubt about it.”
 
Anton Markoč is currently a post-doctoral fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies at the University of Rijeka. He holds a PhD and an MA in Philosophy from Central European University and BSc and specialist degrees in Political Science from University of Montenegro. He specializes in moral and political philosophy, broadly construed, and has competence in similar fields, including the history of moral and political thought, moral psychology, and philosophy of action. His PhD dissertation, “It’s Not the Thought that Counts: An Essay on the Irrelevance of Intentions to the Moral Permissibility of Actions”, was supervised by János Kis and it defended the view that intentions are non-derivatively irrelevant to the moral permissibility of actions. In 2015, he was a Fellow in Philosophy at Harvard University, where he was supervised by T. M. Scanlon. In 2015-2016, he was an adjunct lecturer at University of Donja Gorica in Podgorica, Montenegro, where he taught courses in moral and political philosophy, while in 2014, he worked as a tutor in philosophy at CEU’s Roma Graduate Preparation Program.