Rijeka

“THE NEW LEFT” SUMMER SCHOOL

Organizers: FES DIALOGUE SOE & CAS SEE

Venue: Rijeka University Campus, Faculty for the Humanities and Social Sciences,
Sveučilišna avenija 4, IV Floor; Room 401, Rijeka

Dates: June 11th – 17th 2017

Rationale and Background for the Summer School:

The region of Southeast Europe is facing significant political and economic challenges which creates worrying distrust in the very basics and foundations of politics and institutions. As a result, a new wave of protest movements has been emerging all over the region. All countries experienced mass mobilizations: anti-government and student protests, workers’ strikes in privatized companies etc. Many of those protests are genuine democratic movements and challenge the current narrative of political fatigue. The FES Dialogue SOE has been actively engaging with these new societal actors through a series of activist fora. At the same time the CAS SEE has been investing resources in thinking about the current crisis of democracy in the region and beyond while providing necessary theoretical impetus for re-thinking democracy and political action.

In the activist fora, the primary goal was to forge new connections towards the re-thinking and consolidation of the Southeast European Left. The activist fora have aimed at developing a participatory means of translating civic action into an overarching platform that is based on positions identified as the joint fault-lines by the activists from various movements and struggles across Southeast Europe. From the activist fora the idea emerged to elevate the process towards a more concrete dimension by streamlining various inputs from activists as well as partnering organisations like CAS SEE or European Alternatives into a comprehensive a political platform labelled the Democratic Left ‘18 (#DL18). Herein lies the ultimate goal to establish a politically and ideologically relevant platform to be used by Left actors from both established political and grassroots backgrounds, with the aim of consolidating the Left in Southeast Europe.

Objectives of the Summer School:

The Summer School “The NEW LEFT” is envisioned as a consolidation effort of the inputs created so far in the process. The Summer School will:

  • provide a framework for exchanging views and insights among activists and academics on the four thematic clusters of the #DL18 platform, namely on Democracy, Economy, Resources, and Social State in a regional context.
  • provide workspaces for the participants to discuss and refine their position papers with advice from academic experts.
  • validate and peer-review #DL18 position papers, identify room for improvement with a view to developing a consistent political platform under the guidance of academic experts.
  • inspire and build capacity of participants through stimulating topical and theoretical inputs by renowned academics.
What is left? How to think left? Opening exchange

 

What is left? How to think left? Opening exchange by Petar Bojanic

 

Programme Board of the summer school:

Felix Henkel, FES Dialogue Southeast Europe

Sanja Bojanic, CAS SEE/CWS, University of Rijeka

Petar Bojanic, IFDT, University of Belgrade

Vedran Dzihic, oiip / CAS SEE

Max Brändle, FES Regional Office for Croatia and Slovenia

Organization Board:

Gazela Pudar Draško, IFDT, University of Belgrade (gazela.pudar@instifdt.bg.ac.rs)

Denis Piplaš, FES Dialogue Southeast Europe (denis.piplas@fes-soe.org)

Emin Eminagić, FES Dialogue Southeast Europe (emin.eminagic@fes-soe.org)

Blanka Smoljan, FES Regional Office for Croatia and Slovenia (blanka.smoljan@fes.hr)

Andrea Mešanović, University of Rijeka (andrea.mesanovic@gmail.com)

Kristina Smoljanovic, University of Rijeka (ksmoljanovic@gmail.com)

 

 

SOCIAL ONTOLOGY SYMPOSIUM

19th Edition of the International Conference 

Contemporary Philosophical Issues

Date: May 22-23, 2017

Conference Venue: Faculty for Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Rijeka, Campus, Sveučilišna avenija 4, 51000 Rijeka

Organizer: Department of Philosophy, Faculty for Humanities and Social Sciences; Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe, University of Rijeka; Croatian Society for Analytic Philosophy, PhD programme “Contemporaneity and Philosophy”; LabOnt, University of Torino; Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade

Monday, May 22nd 2017
Plenary session (Room: 006)
09.00 –  09:30 Registration
09:30 – 10:00 Opening of the conference:

Snježana Prijić- Samaržija, chancellor of the University of Rijeka

Petar Bojanić, Director of the Center of  Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe, IFDT Belgrade University

Chairperson: Nenad Miščević
10:00 –11:00 John Searle

The Structure of Human Society

Chairperson: Sanja Bojanić
11:10 – 12:40 John Searle and Maurizio Ferraris

The Color of Money

13:00 – 14:30 Lunch break

 

Monday, May 22nd 2017
  TOPICS FROM JOHN SEARLE

Session A (room 401)

TOPICS FROM JOHN SEARLE

Session B (room 402)

Chairperson: Iris Vidmar Chairperson: Filip Čeč
14:30 – 15:15 Jennifer Hudin

Can Status Functions Be Discovered?

Tomoyuki Yamada

Formalizing Status Functions of Illocutionary Acts

15:20 – 16:05 Benedikt Perak

Emergence of the Social Reality in the Ontological Model of Lexical Concepts and Constructions

Abigail Klassen

On the Multitude of Kinds of Social Kinds: Problematizing John R. Searle’s Institutional and Non-institutional Social Kinds

16:05 – 16:20 Coffee break Coffee break
Chairperson: Ana Gavran Miloš Chairperson: Andrea Mešanović
16:20 – 17:05 Paolo de Lucia

Dynamics of Normative Impossibility

Bojan Borstner

Metaphysics of Sociality

17:10 – 17:55 Michael Vlerick

Explaining Religion: Introducing an Institutional Approach

Lorenzo Passerini Glazel

Impossible Tokens, Necessary Types

17:55 – 18:10 Coffee break Coffee break
Chairperson: Miljana Milojević Chairperson: Ivan Cerovac
18:10 – 18:55 Giuseppe Lorini

Constitutive Rules and Meta-institutional Concepts

Boran Berčić

Are Nations Social Constructs?

19:00 – 19:45 Zvonimir Šikić

Why do Laws Succeed or do not Succeed?

Edoardo Fregonese

Imposing Function through Document. The Case of an Urban Plan: Plano Tomorrow in Plano (TX)

    20:30 Conference dinner

 

Tuesday, May 23rd 2017
STUDENT WORKSHOPS WITH JOHN SEARLE AND JENNIFER HUDIN

Social ontology meets collective epistemology

Room 006

09:00 –  10:30 Opening remarks: Nenad Smokrović, director of the PhD programme Philosophy and Contemporaneity

John Searle, Jennifer Hudin

Moderator: Snježana Prijić-Samaržija

Matija Lukač: Joint Commitment and Collective  Intentionality – Starting Point and Quality  Criterion

Marko Luka Zubčić: Social Ontology, Social Epistemology and Inferential Individualism

Leonard Pektor: Stoic Epistemic Virtues of Groups – Can there be an Unproblematic Direct Transfer from Individuals to Groups?

Denis Paušić: Is Wide Science a Group that Knows?

10:20 – 10:30 Coffee break
10:30 – 11:05 Moderator: Nenad Smokrović

David Grčki: How Bad is the “Bad Argument”

Aleksandar Šušnjar: Some Reflections on Searle’s View on the Connection between Language and Institution

Kristina Lekić: Group-mind and autism: Can we Talk about the Cognition of the Group of Autistic Persons?

 

Tuesday, May 23rd 2017
  TOPICS FROM JOHN SEARLE

Session A (room 401)

VARIA

Session B (room 402)

Chairperson: Iris Vidmar Chairperson:  Neven Petrović
11:10 – 11:55 Guglielmo Feis

Some (Alternative?) Facts for Searlean Social Ontology

Miljana Milojevic

Extended Mind and Personal Identity

12:00 – 12:45 Alice Borghi

Groups and Populism: a Case Study on Searlean Deontic Powers

Iva Bubalo

Semantics in Computational Cognition?

12:50 – 14:00 Lunch break

 

Tuesday, May 23rd 2017
  TOPICS FROM JOHN SEARLE

Session A (room 401)

VARIA

Session B (room 402)

Chairperson:  Nebojša Zelič Chairperson: Boran Berčić
14:15 – 15:00 Imke Maessen

Ordinary Citizens as the Source of Legal Validity

Danilo Šuster

On the Limits of Argumentation

 

15:05 – 15:50 Maria Matuszkiewicz

An Argument for a Minimal Mental Internalism

Nenad Smokrović

A Real Nature of Argumentation: Individual or Social?

15:50 – 16:00 Coffee break Coffee break
Chairperson: Ivan Cerovac Chairperson: Boran Berčić
16:00 – 16:45 Matjaž Potrč

Objectivity of the Brain in a Vat

Olga Markač

Analogical Reasoning

 

 

CAS SEMINAR WITH ROBERT D. KAPLAN 

Robert D. Kaplan visited Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe on April 21, 2017 and gave a talk about how technology is making geography and geopolitics smaller, more anxious and claustrophobic, so that all of Eurasia is coming together as a single conflict system, even while Europe divides from within. Precisely because globalization leads to integration, it also leads to increased interactions across regions and this intensifies conflict and instability. Kaplan also reflected on the European crisis, in all its aspects, with thoughts and questions about how it looks from the viewpoint of Rijeka, Central Europe, and the former Yugoslavia. Robert D. Kaplan was joined in discussion with Giacomo Scotti, Vanni d’Alessio and Ervin Dubrović.


Robert D. Kaplan is the bestselling author of seventeen books on foreign affairs and travel translated into many languages, including Earning the Rockies, In Europe’s Shadow, Asia’s Cauldron, The Revenge of Geography, Monsoon, The Coming Anarchy, and Balkan Ghosts.
He is a senior fellow at the Center for a New American Security and a senior advisor at Eurasia Group. For three decades he reported on foreign affairs for The Atlantic. He held the national security chair at the United States Naval Academy and was a member of the Pentagon’s Defense Policy Board. Foreign Policy magazine twice named him one of the world’s “Top 100 Global Thinkers.”

 

ANTON MARKOČ

Are There Genuine Reasons Against Intending Harm?
  “Are bad intentions wrongs per se? In other words, are there normative reasons against intending harm and other bad effects which are not derived from reasons against harming or bringing those effects?
The defenders of the Doctrine of Double Effect and all those who subscribe to the thesis that intentions are non-derivatively relevant to the moral permissibility of actions, must answer these questions affirmatively. For there to be a genuine deontological constraint against intending harm, reasons against intending harm must be reasons per se.
In this talk, I evaluate and find wanting three kinds of theoretical justifications of reasons against intending harm as reasons per se: agent-centered, victim-centered, and impersonal. They state, respectively, that bad intentions are wrongs because they are bad for the agent, or for the victim, or because they are bad, period.
I conclude that although the failure of these justifications is not a decisive evidence to think that there are no genuine reasons against intending harm, it is a good enough evidence to raise serious doubt about it.”
 
Anton Markoč is currently a post-doctoral fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies at the University of Rijeka. He holds a PhD and an MA in Philosophy from Central European University and BSc and specialist degrees in Political Science from University of Montenegro. He specializes in moral and political philosophy, broadly construed, and has competence in similar fields, including the history of moral and political thought, moral psychology, and philosophy of action. His PhD dissertation, “It’s Not the Thought that Counts: An Essay on the Irrelevance of Intentions to the Moral Permissibility of Actions”, was supervised by János Kis and it defended the view that intentions are non-derivatively irrelevant to the moral permissibility of actions. In 2015, he was a Fellow in Philosophy at Harvard University, where he was supervised by T. M. Scanlon. In 2015-2016, he was an adjunct lecturer at University of Donja Gorica in Podgorica, Montenegro, where he taught courses in moral and political philosophy, while in 2014, he worked as a tutor in philosophy at CEU’s Roma Graduate Preparation Program.

DEANA JOVANOVIĆ

The thermodynamics of “muljavine i pizdarije”: state, infrastructure and moral economy of district heating in Bor (Serbia) and Rijeka (Croatia)

“In this seminar I provided an anthropological perspective on how citizens in two post-Yugoslav industrial towns – Bor (Serbia) and Rijeka (Croatia) – encounter and negotiate district heating. I explored how moral economy and neoliberal discourses are embedded in people’s encounter with urban material infrastructure (e.g. pipes and manhole covers) and how the state becomes reinvigorated in such encounters. I used ethnographic material I collected in Bor (2012/2013) and a new material collected in Rijeka in order to discuss post-Yugoslav legacies and possibilities for political action/agency. ”

Deana Jovanović is currently a postdoctoral research fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies of Southeastern Europe at the University of Rijeka. Deana holds a PhD in Social Anthropology (the University of Manchester), and she researches urban, political, and environmental anthropology. Her research focuses on anticipations of futures in deindustrialised and reindustrialised urban environments across East Europe.

Rastko Močnik

Fascisms: Historical, Neo-, and Post-

“Public discourses now usually describe the new anti-liberal and anti-globalist politics as “populist”. The term is problematic in many ways. It is pronounced from aloof and entails the suggestion that politics is a matter of expertise, not to be soiled by the people. Consequently, the implied position of uttering contradicts the explicit utterance-contents that presents itself as classically liberal. The term provides a hasty pseudo-solution to what should be examined as a problem: the mass appeal of those politics. By suggesting that politics is a matter of rhetorical adroitness, mainstream discourses legitimate and reproduce the presently dominating political practices in the Euro-Atlantic region that may be one of the causes for the massive discontent, which, in turn, offers social support to the new anti-liberalism. – Within the processes and practices that resulted in the destruction of Yugoslav socialist federation, an important, maybe decisive component were the politics that retroactively appear as an anticipation of the present extremist tide, and whom some of us described at that time as “fascist”. Again, this description seems problematic. As an anachronistic analogy, it may miss the specificity of the present situation. To avoid this trap, we shall look for systemic features, which now generate the familiar elements that have in the past combined into historical fascisms, but which may instead form new patterns in the present.”

 

Rastko Močnik, sociologist, literary theorist, translator and political activist is a retired professor at the University of Ljubljana and a visiting professor at the Faculty of Media and Communications, University Singidunum, Belgrade. He teaches and publishes in critical social science, theory of symbolic formations, epistemology of the humanities and social sciences. Co-chair of the International Board of Directors of the Institute for Critical Social Studies, Sofia and Plovdiv. Doctor honoris causa at the  Plovdiv University “Paisii Hilendarski” (2005).

Carlos González Villa

The Slovene Reaction to the European Migrant Crisis: Class and Ideology at the edge of Schengen

“The European response to the 2015 migrant crisis was initially featured by warm welcome expressions from the European elites. However, it quickly evolved into the enhancement of extremist positions and the ‘Fortress Europe’ pretension. The opposition to the limited relocation and resettlement plan of the European Commission – initially led by several Eastern European countries – ended up in the conclusion of an agreement with Turkey for the return of asylum-seekers to that country. Along this process, governments, mainstream political parties and new far-right organizations have shaped cultural-related and seemingly technical discursive lines for rationalizing the exclusion and rejection of migrants.

In this seminar, I will discuss the suitability of the idea of fascism for denoting current political developments in Europe through the analysis of a peripheral country. Peripherality makes reference to dynamics of economic hierarchisation, but also to specific political dynamics, including, in the Slovene case, questions like the justification of the closure of the ‘Balkan route of refugees’ on the assumption of the government’s responsibility to protect the Schengen external border and the intention of remaining in the core of an eventual multi-speed Europe. The key point of the discussion consists on the identification of specific political processes and dynamics of social change beyond traditional categorisations of political actors, which have become increasingly blurred.”

Carlos González Villa is a postdoctoral fellow at the CAS SEE (University of Rijeka) and member of the Research Group on Current History. He completed his PhD in Political Science in 2014 at the Complutense University of Madrid, with a thesis that addressed the process of Independence of Slovenia and its international implications. He has a strong research interest in the foreign policy of the United States towards Yugoslavia during the crisis of the dissolution. He has recently started a new research line on the ideological drift of Eastern European elites. He has been a visiting scholar at the School of Advanced International Studies of the Johns Hopkins University (Washington DC) and the Faculty of Arts of the University of Ljubljana.

Rijeka 2020 – European Capital of Culture

FASHION WEEK – WINTER 2016

Fashion week – Winter 2016 is a seasonal event which took place on December 19 – 20, 2016, at the OKC Palach in Rijeka. The Winter 2016 pilot edition presented us with a two day display of the basic themes and concepts of the Sweet & Salt Flagship, including the theoretical background of the planned urban reinvention of the part of the city where the river meets the sea.

The lead project host of the Sweet & Salt flagship is the Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe at the University of Rijeka. The flagship is striving to produce multiple projects that will honour the memory of forlorn spaces, while inspiring modern urban planning within the program of Rijeka 2020 – European Capital of Culture. The 6-year flagship, guided by architect Idis Turato, will aim to engage citizens in critical debates about their urban environment, stimulated by various artistic interventions.

Fashion week

The first day of the Winter 2016 edition introduced the inspiring works of 9th semester architecture students (Faculty of Architecture, University of Zagreb), presented at an exhibition at the SKC Gallery and thoroughly discussed during five panels by a selection of international experts in the fields of architecture and urban planning, followed by critical debates with their mentors and professors. The first day concluded with the Urban Update / Upgrade public debate, a discussion which hosted the esteemed architects and art historians Simon Hartmann, Maroje Mrduljaš, Dinko Peračić and Luka Skansi.

izlozba Vi ste sada ovdje

The program of the second day of the Winter 2016 edition was publicly accessible, commencing with the presentation of the art exhibition Vi ste sada ovdje (You Are Now Here by Vuk Ćosić) featuring historical and geographic maps of Rijeka and the surrounding region. The exhibition can be viewed at the Plavi salon Gallery at the Rijeka City Hall and will remain open until the end of January 2017 (every Wednesday from 4.00 to 6.00 pm at the address Korzo 16). The Winter 2016 program continued with multiple panels focusing on the current (real) state of cities within the region and the future (speculative) realities. The Rijeka ECOC 2020 – Amplifier of Urban Reinvention public debate hosted Emina Višnić (Director of Rijeka ECOC 2020), Vojko Obersnel (Mayor of Rijeka), Neil Peterson (Liverpool ECOC 2008), Janez Koželj (Deputy Mayor of Ljubljana) and, encouraged by Vuk Ćosić’s moderation (Rijeka ECOC 2020), provided a chance to chart both the inspiring possibilities and the evident challenges of the urban reinvention which the Rijeka 2020 – European Capital of Culture project will ensure.

On Mothers and Daughters with Mira Furlan

The upcoming January premiere of the Autumn Sonata by Ingmar Bergman at the Croatian National Theatre Ivan pl. Zajc in Rijeka was a great motive for another collaboration of scientific and art institutions in Rijeka. This time, the theme of engagement was a contemplation on the specifics and challenges of a complex mother – daughter relationships.

Bergman’s piece opens multiple challenges emerging from the concept of this relationship. The most obvious one might be that of a conflict as a common theme in general displays of women’s relations and with it related misogynist, patriarchal matrix “guarding” the possibilities of affirmative and exclusively women’s connections.

On the other side, “(women’s) family romances” are a counterpoise of an equally limited rhetorical reach. The emerging question therefor might be: what are and what could be the vocabularies of presenting this specific relationship and parenting in general, as a socially important, closely monitored and regulated agency? The talk On Mothers and Daughters led by Mira Furlan, Olga Dimitrijević, Sanja Milutinović Bojanić and Brigita Miloš,  organized by Center for Women’s Studies (Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences), Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe and The Croatian National Theatre Ivan pl. Zajc in Rijeka was held on November 24, 2016 at the University Campus in Rijeka.

AUTUMN 2016 CAS SEE FELLOWSHIP RECIPIENTS

The Center for Advanced Studies Southeast Europe (CAS SEE) is pleased to announce the recipients of the Autumn 2016 CAS SEE Fellowship Awards at the University of Rijeka. The purpose of the CAS SEE Fellowship Programme is to further the research and creative work in the fields of the humanities and humanistic social sciences in the Balkans. Fellows will present their work within the CAS-Collegium, creating an intellectually heterogeneous atmosphere and fostering a productive self-examination or even friction, which may lead to new and unexpected ideas and innovation.

Please join us in congratulating the following Autumn 2016 CAS SEE Fellowship Awards, University of Rijeka recipients:

Andrew Hodges (Manchester – UK)

Project – title: Social Inequalities on the Urban Periphery? Vocational Education, Ultras’ Participation and Cultures of Resistance in the Classroom 

Carlos González Villa (Madrid – Spain)

Project – title: The Slovene Reaction to the European Migrant Crisis: Class and Ideology at the edge of Schengen

Deana Jovanovic (Manchester –  UK)

Project – title: Industrial Urban Spaces: after Yugoslavia

Anton Markoč (Budapest –  Hungary)

Project – title: It’s Not the Thought that Counts: The Irrelevance of Intentions to the Moral Blameworthiness of Actions

Ernesto C. Sferrazza Papa (Torino – Italy)

Project – title: Walls and bodies: a philosophical research on the material government of human mobility