Julija Sardelić

BOOKS, PAPERS AND REVIEWS PUBLISHED BY CAS SEE FELLOWS

CAS SEE fellows have published or are about to publish an impressive list of publications in the period between 2015 and 2017:

Benli, A. E. (2016) Implementing global taxes on natural resources: A social choice approach. Diacritica Vol. 30, No. 2 (pp. 15-32)

Carabelli, G. (2015) Review of the book The Political Economy of Divided Islands: Unified Geographies, Multiple Polities. Urban Island Studies, Vol. 1 (pp. 187-189)

Cerovac, I. (2017) Epistemic Democracy: A Guest Editor’s Preface. Etica & Politica – Ethics & Politics, Vol. 19, No. 2 (str. 161-168)

Cerovac, I. (2017) The democratic and participatory potential of Europarties, Policy Briefs: FEPS and Renner Institute (May 2017)

Cerovac, I. (2017, forthcoming) Epistemic Liberalism. Prolegomena, Vol. 14 No. 2 (forthcoming)

Hodges, A. (2016) Croatian Language Standardization and the Production of Nationalised Political Subjects through Language: Perspectives from the Social Sciences. Etnološka tribina : Godišnjak Hrvatskog etnološkog društva, Vol.46, No.39 (pp. 3-45)

Hodges, A. and Brentin, D. (forthcoming) Football from below in South-Eastern Europe: An Introduction. Soccer & Society (forthcoming)

Marek, S. (2017) Parallel Claims for the Human Right to Water: The Case of Roma in Slovenia. In: Archibugi, D. and Benli, A. E. [Eds.] (2017) Claiming Citizenship Rights in Europe. London: Routledge

Markoč, A. (2017) Intentions and Permissibility: A Confusion of Moral Categories? The Journal of Value Inquiry.

Rexhepi, P. (2015) Mainstreaming Islamophobia: The Politics of European Enlargement and the Balkan Crime-Terror Nexus. East European Quarterly, Vol. 43, No. 2-3 (pp. 189-214)

Sardelić, J. (2016) The position and agency of the ‘irregularized’: Romani migrants as European semi-citizens. Politics Journal.

Sardžoska, N. (2017) Limitrope Border Zones: The Polisemic Spaces of Istria. Research in Social Change, Vol. 9, No. 1 (pp. 69-82)

Sasso, A. (forthcoing, 2017) ‘Observation, not resolution’. The final congresses of the Bosnian communists (1989-1990). In. Kamberović, H. (Ed.) (forthcoing, 2017) Bosna i Hercegovina u socijalističkoj Jugoslaviji: od Ustava 1946. do Deklaracije o nezavisnosti 1991. godine – Zbornik Radova. Sarajevo: Institut za Istoriju – UHMIS.

Sasso, A. (2016) Review of Robert Donia’s Radovan Karadžić – Architect of the Bosnian Genocide, Diacronie, Vol. 28, No. 4 (pp 7-8)

Walton, J. F. (2017) Muslim Civil Society and the Politics of Religious Freedom in Turkey. New York: Oxford University Press.

Walton, J. F. (2015) Labours of Inter-religious Tolerance: Cultural and Spatial Intimacy in Croatia and Turkey.” Cambridge Journal of Anthropology, Vol. 33, No. 2 (pp. 59-76)

Walton, J. F. (2015) The Institutions and Discourses of Hizmet, and Their Discontents. In: Marty, M. (Ed.) (2015) Hizmet Means Service: Perspectives on an Alternative Path within Islam. University of California Press.

Walton, J. F. (2015) Everyday I’m Çapulling!’: Global Flows and Local Frictions of Gezi. In: David, I. and Toktamis, K. (Eds.) (2015) The Gezi Protests and Beyond: Contesting AKP Rule. Amsterdam University Press.

 

CAS SEE Summer school Programme

RETHINKING POLITICS OF DIVERSITY

RIJEKA UNIVERSITY CAMPUS, FACULTY FOR THE HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES, Sveučilišna avenija 2, IV Floor; Room 401, Rijeka
September 12th – September 16th 2016

Organized by:

Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe, University of Rijeka

In cooperation with:

Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade

Friedrich Ebert Stiftung – Zagreb

University Paris 8, Vincennes-St Denis

Center for Women’s Studies, University of Rijeka

This summer school should provide space for recasting frameworks of “diversity politics” and “diversity discourses” in Europe. In light of recent events, we would like to challenge the crisis of multiculturalism and core European values of solidarity and human rights. The “failure of multiculturalism” narrative has become all too present in Europe, shifting the rhetoric to cultural anxieties and articulating immigration as a national threat. This discourse has also affected “internal immigration”, making certain groups throughout Europe less visible and more vulnerable: Roma, refugees and internally displaced persons, certain LGBTQ communities. Moreover, ethnicity, nationality, religion and race are being forcefully reshuffled, inviting contemporary forces of nationalism and securitization. Hereby, we are particularly interested to the effects of the ways how European countries ‘manage’ diversity through its policies and practices: from ethnic and racial to socio-economic diversity, but also particularly to citizenship and migration status diversity. It is of crucial interest to map and evidence differences among significantly varying Western European practices (France, UK, Germany etc.), Central European practices (former communist countries with strong opposition to multiculturalism) and South-Eastern European practices in countries where migration is observed as passing-by phenomenon.

The lectures and seminars of this summer school particularly investigate how these three identified regions policies connected to governmentality of diversity are changing after the recent and actual conflicts and migration flows. The summer school will particularly focus on policies and practices that affect marginalized and vulnerable groups in these regions.

The summer school’s main goal is to highlight the agency of these marginalized groups in order to understand, how they themselves respond to the reconfigurations of diversity politics and practices.

TIMETABLE
Monday, Sept 12, 2016

Time

Activity Lecturers

Abstract and/or suggested readings

10.30

11.30

Arrival and Registration
11.30

12.00

Opening session:

 

Introduction

Julija Sardelic, Gazela Pudar Drasko, Sanja Bojanic, Brigita Milos, Adriana Zaharijevic
12.00

12.30

Coffee break
12.30

14.00

Lecture and Debate:

 

Refugee Crises, the Question of Multiculturalism and Position of Marginalized Minorities

Julija Sardelic

 

School of Law and Social Justice, University of Liverpool

–         Biljana Đorđević (2015) Whose Rights, Whose Return? The Boundary Problem and Unequal Restoration of Citizenship in the Post-Yugoslav Space, Ethnopolitics, 14:2, 121-139, DOI: 10.1080/17449057.2014.991150

–         Giuseppe Forino (2016) From Gevgelija to Budapest: The bare life in transit camps of the Balkans and Eastern Europe, Transnational Social Review, 6:1-2, 180-186, DOI: 10.1080/21931674.2016.1186420

–         Viktor Koska (2015) Refugee Integration and Citizenship Policies: The Case Study of Croatian Serbs in Vojvodina, Ethnopolitics, 14:2, 180-196, DOI: 10.1080/17449057.2014.991155

–         Gëzim Krasniqi (2015) Equal Citizens, Uneven Communities: Differentiated and Hierarchical Citizenship in Kosovo, Ethnopolitics, 14:2, 197-217, DOI: 10.1080/17449057.2014.991152

–         Julija Sardelić (2015) Romani Minorities and Uneven Citizenship Access in the Post-Yugoslav Space, Ethnopolitics, 14:2, 159-179, DOI: 10.1080/17449057.2014.991154

14.00

15.30

Lunch Break
15.30

16.30

Presentation of the project and Debate:

 

Global Migration Governance: Will 2016 be the decisive year?

 

Caroline Schultz

 

Expert Council of German Foundations on Integration and Migration, Berlin

Migration management remains one of the last bastions of national sovereignty. As a result, most countries traditionally tend to be more cautious when setting international standards related to migration. Global migration governance therefore resembles a fragmented tapestry. Since the turn of the millennium, however, there has been considerable movement in the international fabric of norms and rules on migration: migration plays a role in many areas of the UN system, outside of the UN as well, migration issues are increasingly discussed on the international stage. Germany is also more and more involved in global migration policy, and not just since the sharp rise in refugee arrivals over the last two years. For example, in 2017/2018 Germany, together with Morocco, will chair the Global Forum on Migration and Development (GFMD). The presentation will provide a critical overview of global migration governance, taking into account the most recent developments leading up to the September 19th UN high-level meeting to address large movements of refugees and migrants and sketch out what lays ahead in this field.
16.30

17.00

Concluding remarks for the day
17.00

17.30

Photo exhibition opening (Faculty for the Humanities and Social Sciences, Main Hall):

 

Out of Sight: Poverty, Rurality, Gender

Jelena Ćeriman, CELAP

Miloš Kosovac, CELAP

Kristina Smoljanović, CAS SEE

The exhibition “Out of Sight: Poverty, Rurality, Gender” deals with gender and social disparities in rural areas and focuses on specific areas of social politics. The intersection of exclusion, poverty and gender means that the slightest social tremor plunges those living in poverty and isolation into isolation and neglect. We innovated the way in which we communicate research results by including representatives of the group itself into the creative part of work and allowing them to demonstrate their capacity of perceiving inequalities, barriers and obstacles they meet in everyday life. They achieve this through making photos. Using a camera, girls, young women and women from rural areas complemented our results and ethnographic materials made by our researchers, by giving a human face to poverty and social exclusion.
 Tuesday, Sept 13, 2016
Time Activity Lecturers

Text

10.00

11.30

Lecture and Debate:

 

Modern citizenship struggles and the (impossible) choice between cultural recognition and socioeconomic justice in Southeastern Europe

Gezim Krasniqi

 

School of Slavonic and East European Studies, University College London

–      Andreas Wimmer, Nationalist Exclusion Ethnic Conflict: Shadows of Modernity (Cambridge University Press), 2002.

–      Rogers Brubaker, Grounds for Difference. Harvard University Press, 2015. Chapter 1.

–      Nancy Fraser, From Redistribution To Recognition? Dilemmas Of Justice In A ‘Post-Socialist’ Age, New Left Review, I/212, July-August 1995

–      https://newleftreview.org/II/3/nancy-fraser-rethinking-recognition

–      Nina Bandelj and Mathew C Bahutga, How Socio-Economic Change Shapes Income Inequality in Post-Socialist Europe, Social Factors (2010), 88:5

11.30

12.00

Coffee break
12.00

13.30

Lecture and Debate:

 

Multilingualism in European Literature and Cultural Diversity

Jörg Schulte

 

Institute of Slavonic Studies, University of Cologne

–         Mehrsprachigkeit in Zentraleuropa: Zur Geschichte einer literarischen und kulturellen Chance. Hrsg. v. András F. Balogh. Wien 2012.

–         Nabokov, Vladimir/Boyd, Brian: Verses and Versions: Three Centuries of Russian Poetry. Orlando 2008.

–         Niger, Samuel: Bilingualism in the History of Jewish Literature. Lanham 1990.

–         Radaelli, Giulia: Literarische Mehrsprachigkeit: Sprachwechsel bei Elias Canetti und Ingeborg Bachmann. Berlin 2011.

–         Weissbort, Daniel: Translation: Theory and Practice. A Historical Reader. Oxford 2006.

13.30

15.00

Lunch Break
15.00

16.30

Presentation of the Project and Debate:

 

Accepting the Difference: Feminist Theory in the class and Feminist Press in Serbia in the 1990s and 2000s

Biljana Dojcinovic and Ana Kolaric

 

Faculty of Philology, University of Belgrade

–     Biljana Dojčinović  (2006). “De-centerd Pluralism of Methods: Feminist Literary Criticism in Serbia” u GendeRingS, Gendered Readings in Serbian Women’s Writing, Indok centar 2006. (pdf knjige u prilogu, prvi tekst u knjizi)

–     Dojčinović B., Koch, M. (2011) “In Search of Women Authors”, an Interview with Suzan van Dijk, http://www.knjizenstvo.rs/magazine.php?text=25.

–     Afterword: We Other Periodicalists, or, Why Periodical Studies?, Manushag N. Powell, Tulsa Studies in Women’s Literature, Volume 30, Number 2, Fall 2011, pp. 441-450

–     Ana Kolarić “Rane kritike Rebeke Vest” http://www.knjizenstvo.rs/magazine.php?text=132

16.30

17.00

Concluding remarks for the day
 Wednesday, Sept 14, 2016
Time Activity Lecturers

Text

10.00

11.30

Lecture and Debate:

 

Europe and its Others: The Figure of the Migrant in the Construction of the European Union

Céline Cantat

 

Central European University, Budapest

–      Balibar, Etienne, 2003, We, the People of Europe? Reflections on Transnational Citizenship (Princeton University Press)

–      Delanty, Gerard, 1995, Inventing Europe: Idea, Identity, Reality  (Macmillan).

–      Fekete, Liz, 2001, “The Emergence of Xeno-Racism,” Race & Class, Vol. 43, no. 2.

11.30

12.00

Coffee break
12.00

13.30

Lecture and Debate:

 

The Road Not Taken. Neoliberalism, Xenophobia, and Terrorism

Eric Fassin

 

University Paris 8, Vincennes-St Denis

–       Eric Fassin, “National Identities and Transnational intimacies: sexual democracy and the politics of immigration in Europe”, Public Culture, 22:3, Duke University Press. http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/historypresent.1.2.0265?origin=JSTOR-pdf&seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents

–       Roms, une politique de la race https://vimeo.com/131783052

–       Eric Fassin, “Criticism to Critique”, History of the Present, Vol. 1, No. 2 (Fall 2011), pp. 265-274.

13.30

15.00

Lunch
17.30

19.00

Round Table, City Hall, Rijeka

 

Hosted by the Mayor of Rijeka, M Vojko Obersnel

Crossing Roads: Civil Society and Academia

 (Speaking in Croatian)

The question of representing the reality of society is fundamental and is now threatened by the triumph of simplified visions of society, visions of the other who does not correspond to reality. We couldn’t make democracy if we stayed in terrible ignorance of each other. Participating in this very same reality also demands a willingness to recognize that the democracy is intermittent and thoughtless, that it needs knowledge. Academia and civil society meet on crossroads of action and thinking. Both realms of common reality should think and study their actions and act in their research and studies.

Doris Kramaric / PaRiter, Rijeka

Lorena Zec / SOS Rijeka – centre for nonviolence and human rights

Vedran Obucina / Institute for European and Globalisation Studies

Nebojša Zelic / Faculty for Philosophy and Social Sciences, University of Rijeka

Bojana Culum / Faculty for Philosophy and Social Sciences, University of Rijeka  (TBC)

Moderator: Danko Zitinic / University of Rijeka

19.00

20.30

Reception at the Cukarikafe Bar (Trg Jurja Klovica 4, 51000, Rijeka)
 Thursday, Sept 15, 2016

Time

Activity Lecturers

Text

10.00

11.00

Presentation of the project:

 

When the Rooftops Became red Again: Post War Community Dynamics in Bosnia and Herzegovina

Marika Djolai

 

CAS SEE Fellow, University of Rijeka, Institute for Development Studies, Brighton

–      George Hillery (1982), Research odyssey: developing and testing a community theory. New Brunswick. Transaction Books.

–      Roger Brubaker (2014), Ethnicity without groups. Cambridge, Mass; London: Harvard University Press.

11.00

11.30

Coffee break
11.30

12.30

Presentation of the project:

Topic area: Freedom of Expression and Hate Speech in Today’s Diversified Europe: Was that Supposed to Be Funny?

Stand-Up Satire and ‘Political Correctness’

Edward Djordjevic and Jelena Ceriman

 

Center for Ethics, Law and Applied Philosophy, Belgrade

–         Fairclough, Norman. ‘Political Correctness’: Politics of Culture and Language. Discourse and Society 14(1):17-28, 2003.

–         Raul, Perez. Learning to make racism funny in the ‘color-blind’ era: Stand-up comedy students, performance strategies, and the (re)production of racist jokes in public. Discourse and Society 24: 478-503, 2013.

–         Borns, Betsy. Comic Lives: Inside the World of Stand-Up Comedy. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1987.

–         Butler, Judith. Excitable Speech: A Politics of the Performative. New York: Routledge, 1997.

12.30

13.30

Presentation of the campaign and debate:

NO hate speech movement: lessons to be learnt

Gazela Pudar Drasko

 

Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, Belgrade

 

Member of the National Committee for Implementing Campaign for Combating Hate Speech Online of Republic Serbia

–         BOOKMARKS: a manual for combating hate speech online through human rights education
13.30

15.00

Lunch Break
15.00

16.30

Lecture and Debate:

 

Rethinking Inequality: Affect, knowledge, and politics of difference

 

Marjo Kolehmainen

 

Visiting fellow, GEXcel International Collegium for Advanced Transdisciplinary Gender Studies, Linköping university, Sweden,

Postdoc, School of Social Sciences and Humanities, University of Tampere, Finland

–      Ahmed, Sara (2004): Affective Economics. Social Text 79, 22(2), pp. 117-139

–      Hemmings, Clare (2012): Affective solidarity: Feminist reflexivity and political transformation. Feminist Theory 13(2), pp. 147-161

16.30

17.00

Concluding remarks of the day:

 

All lives matter: whose life is livable?

 

Is it enough to speak up? About affective inequalities and other misunderstandings

 

 

Adriana Zaharijevic

 

 

Sanja Bojanic, Brigita Milos

IFDT, University of Belgrade, CAS SEE, Center for Women’s Studies

University of Rijeka

 Friday, Sept 15, 2016

Time

Activity Lecturers

Text

10.00

11.30

Lecture and Debate:

 

The “icy waters” of Europe and agonistic politics

Athena Athanasiou

 

Panteion University of Social and Political Sciences, Athens

–         Judith Butler, Notes Toward a Performative Theory of Assembly. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2015.

–         Chantal Mouffe, Agonistics: Thinking the World Politically. London: Verso 2013.

11.30

12.00

Coffee break
12.00

13.30

Lecture and Debate:

 

Nomadism and belonging in feminist postcolonial art

Elena Tzelepis, Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities, University of London

–         Braidotti, Rosi, 2011, Nomadic Subjects: Embodiment and Sexual Difference in Contemporary Feminist Theory, New York: Columba UP, Second Edition.

–         Butler Judith and Athena Athanasiou, 2013, Dispossession: The Performative in the Political, Cambridge: Polity Press.

13.30

15.00

Lunch Break
15.00

17.00

Panel Discussion:

 

What is Left in Diversity and what is Diverse in Left?

Opening remarks: Max Brändle (FES Zagreb)

 

Felix Henkel (FES Regional Office, Sarajevo), Athena Athanasiou (Panteion University of Social and Political Sciences, Athens), Adriana Zaharijevic (IFDT), Vuk Prica, (Chair of the Youth Council, Primorje – Gorski Kotar County), Nebojsa Zelic (Faculty for Philosophy and Social Sciences, University of Rijeka), Vedran Dzihic (CAS SEE), Sanja Bojanic (CAS SEE)

CAS SEE University of Rijeka will prepare official CAS SEE certificates with detailed overview of the summer school program and students’ requirements (sufficient for 3 ECTS). The recognition of the ECTS depends solely on the institutions students are coming from. Summer School Program committee will sign the certificates at the end of the course.

Programme Board of the summer school:

Sanja Bojanic, CAS SEE/CWS, University of Rijeka

Eric Fassin, University Paris 8

Brigita Miloš, Center for Women Studies (CWS), University of Rijeka

Adriana Zaharijevic, IFDT, University of Belgrade

Violetta Zentai, CEU, Budapest

Petar Bojanic, CAS SEE, University of Rijeka / IFDT, University of Belgrade

Organization Board:

Gazela Pudar Drasko, IFDT, University of Belgrade (gazela.pudar@instifdt.bg.ac.rs)

Andrea Mešanovic, University of Rijeka (andrea.mesanovic@gmail.com)

Kristina Smoljanovic, University of Rijeka (ksmoljanovic@gmail.com)

JULIJA SARDELIĆ

ACTS OF CITIZENSHIP FROM THE MARGINS: THE POSITION AND AGENCY OF IRREGULARIZED ROMANI MINORITIES IN POST-YUGOSLAV SPACE

In her presentation, Julija Sardelić maps recent transformations in the position of Romani minorities caused by the disintegration of former Socialist Yugoslavia, the subsequent military conflicts, and the establishment of new post-Yugoslav states. She argues that Romani minorities have not been only the targets of physical violence conducted mostly by majorities and more dominant minorities, but also that their position was constructed through what post-colonial theory comprehends as the “epistemic violence” of redefining the boundaries of citizenry, where they fell on the margins. She examines the myriad of non-citizenship positions that many Romani individuals have occupied in post-Yugoslav space, from refugees and internally displaced to legally invisible persons.     The lecture also investigates the processes that irregularized the position of Romani individuals, who had previously been regular Yugoslav citizens, but now find themselves in a legal limbo in which they are neither recognized as citizens nor as de jure stateless persons (in Homi Bhabha’s terms, they are left somewhere in-between). In the second part of this presentation, Sardelić will focus on strategies of coping and other ways in which Romani individuals react to their irregularized position as citizens in order to show that robbing them of their legal status has not robbed them of their agency. She will show this by exploring the migration patterns that non-EU, post-Yugoslav Romani individuals traverse between the EU and post-Yugoslav space. Furthermore, she will highlight the everyday practices of Romani individuals, who remain immobile in the post-Yugoslav space and have no official access to healthcare, education, social welfare and labor market.

FRAGILE INFRASTRUCTURES OF TOGETHERNESS

CAS SEE Fellows Panel in Belgrade

Chair: Sanja Milutinović Bojanić (CAS SEE, Rijeka)

IMG_5976IMG_5948IMG_5975IMG_5984


 

Aleksandra Djurasovic
Center for Advanced Studies in Southeastern Europe (CAS – SEE), University of Rijeka

“Oh, we could be together, if only the things weren’t so complicated”: Complexity Factor in the Late Post-Socialist Transition in Bosnia and Herzegovina

The paper analyzes planning processes in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) in order to offer insights into newly-shaping planning systems in Southeastern Europe (SEE) during the late phase of post-socialist transition. The paper argues that:

  1. Societal complexity makes transition more complex and creates boundaries to democratic decision making.
  2. High level of complexity associated with a political and economic arrangement causes a new type of urban transformation reflecting the multi-faceted transitions (post-socialist, war-to-peace and neoliberal) and their ever evolving dynamics.
  3. Disrupted by war and peace-building processes in the aftermath of the political, social and economic change in Eastern Europe, BiH went through a different set of complexities, compared to other post-socialist regions.

The research takes complexity as a very pragmatic set of reasons why transition processes differ in different contexts. For that reason, this research will only discuss complexities related to BiH. There are many easily recognized and hidden complexities attached to the multifaceted transition processes in BiH, and the most visible ones are: Destruction, Social Division, Corruption, The ‘Rule of Law’, Motivational rather than revitalization reconstruction strategies and short-sighted planning, Donor Fatigue, and Unclear transition path and end point of transition. Through a thorough literature review and a series of semi-structured interviews the paper will show that due to these complexities, BiH moves slowly on its transition path and decision making systems are reduced to a vague set of fragmented development strategies more open for individual development approaches.


 

Giulia Carabelli
Center for Advanced Studies in Southeastern Europe (CAS – SEE), University of Rijeka

Affects That Bond and Disband: On the Production of Spaces for Being Together-with and -against in Bosnia Herzegovina During the 2014 Protests

In this paper, I will account critically for the waves of grassroots resistance that troubled the political stillness (stasis) of Bosnia Herzegovina in 2014. The main aim of this paper is to explore the ways in which protesters (as agents of change) come-together to form and maintain political movements able to shake consensus and to reclaim ‘the political’ (Rancière) beyond the singularity of the protest-event. This paper draws on the preliminary results of an ongoing research largely based on interviews with key organisers and participants in the 2014 protests in Sarajevo and Tuzla.

I will propose two entry points for the analysis of the protests. Firstly, I am interested in unravelling the production and articulation of these spaces of rebellion by considering their ‘affective atmospheres’ (Anderson, 2009). Drawing on recent debates in the social sciences that call for attention to be given to affects in the production of socio-spatial relations (Ahmed; Anderson; Berlant; Cooper), I propose to think with and through ‘anger’, ‘rage’, and ‘hope’ as means to understand how spaces where to be together-with and together-against were created, maintained or exhausted during the Bosnian protests.

Secondly, and drawing on Lefebvre’s understanding of heterotopias as those moments of disruption to the political order that hold the potential for radical change, I wish to discuss the 2014 protests as heterotopias in order to explore their potential and limits within the context of Bosnian politics. In particular, I wish to reflect on how the creation of these antagonist pockets of radical politics created spaces that seemed able to function only in absolute opposition to mainstream politics: How does to be ‘radical’ create and limit political participation? How does radicalism work as an affective agent that creates communities of belonging but also as a force that disband the protesters from existing political infrastructures? Is it possible to reconcile radicalism with radical political change?


 

Piro Rexhepi
Center for Advanced Studies in Southeastern Europe (CAS – SEE), University of Rijeka

After Ankara: Hierarchies of Togetherness and Humanitarian Violence

This paper is part theoretical reflections on the continued potency of togetherness to reconstitute assembly and action and part critique of international solidarities that appeal to humanitarian violence in the name of togetherness. I explore the taxonomies that inform ‘international’ notions of solidarity and the hierarchies of togetherness by asking if bodies assembled together in the margins must be bounded with the language of the center for their demands to be transposable across b/orders. In this context, I examine how local political claims traverse and labor with the grammar of global human rights assemblages that converge and conflate state violence with solidarity in light of Butler’s (2011) argument that “the local must be recast outside itself in order to be established as local.” Starting with a discussion on the recent “Call by Academics for International Solidarity after the Ankara Bombing” (2015), I examine how local political demands travel through, and recruit humanitarian violence, reconstituting European colonial markers of difference that continue to legitimize some forms of violence over others. Ricks (2012) question, “How can we be ethically opposed to some forms of violence while being in favor of others?” informs my questioning of universalist and universalizing appeals of togetherness that continue to be situated in international institutions facilitated by state/market powers.


 

Francesco Marone
Center for Advanced Studies in Southeastern Europe (CAS – SEE), University of Rijeka

The Body as a Weapon: The Logic of Self-Sacrifice in Suicide Bombing

Suicide terrorism has become one of the most important and emblematic forms of violence of our age, particularly since 11 September 2001. Suicide attacks represent acts of organised violence in which the perpetrators deliberately sacrifice their own life. The willingness to die is combined with the willingness to kill in the same act simultaneously: the goal is therefore “dying to kill” (Bloom 2005). Moreover, in suicide attacks the ‘martyr’’s death is a necessary requisite of the mission because it is self-inflicted, frequently by means of explosive devices (suicide bombings).

Despite recurrent references to the past and return to the ‘true’ fundamentals of religion (in particular, the traditional idea of martyrdom in Islam), genuine suicide bombing is a modern phenomenon, emerged only in the early 1980s during the Lebanese civil war.

In suicide bombings, the human body becomes a sort of “ultimate smart bomb”. Suicide bombing, used so often by groups that fear and reject the modern world, can be seen as “a quintessentially modern technology that pushes the disenchanting and de-sacralizing elements of the modern world to their limits” (Lewis 2012, p. 25). In a sense, the idea of martyrdom is translated into a reliable from of control technology.

My presentation discusses this approach to suicide bombing, from a social science perspective, with particular reference to the “local” case of the Palestinian armed groups and the “global” case of the al-Qaeda network.


 

Julija Sardelic
Center for Advanced Studies in Southeastern Europe (CAS – SEE), University of Rijeka

Acts of Citizenship from the Margins: Romani Minorities and Social Movements in Southeastern Europe

Romani minorities are considered to be one of the most marginalized and excluded populations in Southeastern Europe. The position of Roma has been highlighted by many scholars, who argued that they are not only passive observers, but do engage as activist citizens especially to challenge the existing orders of discriminatory practices towards them. However, most of the previous studies highlighted only how Romani activists engage in protest movements, which address inequalities arising due to stigmatization of their own ‘ethnic identity’ and can be thus considered similar to civil rights movement by US African-Americans. In my research, I aim to dispute the claim that Romani activism can be narrowed down to identity politics formulating two main hypotheses. Firstly, due to its hybrid and heterogeneous nature Romani movement does not revolve only around the question of ethnicity, but more Intersectional issues that concern all citizens. More importantly, on the basis of interviews with several Romani activists from the post-Yugoslav space, I argue that they also participate in recent protests that go beyond ethnic lines. I claim that these protest namely form a new platform of ‘togetherness’, where Romani activists are not marginalized and discriminated, but are in fact included as equals.


 

Vera Tripodi
Center for Advanced Studies in Southeastern Europe (CAS – SEE), University of Rijeka

The Role of the Body in Politics, Epistemic Injustice, and Prejudice

In Notes Towards a Performative Theory of Assembly (2015), Judith Butler extends her concept of performativity to public assemblies. More specifically, she argues that public assemblies can be understood as embodied ways of coming together and explained in terms of plural forms of performative action. Also, rights of assembly imply – Butler underlines – the body, understood properly, in a collective and embodied sets of acts. According to this view, in taking to the streets to protest or assert certain kind of demands or to object to certain social conditions, people embody their resistance and their right to be heard.

But, how is it that we embody the right to be heard? How is it that we constitute or fail to constitute ourselves as “we the people”? In my talk, I attempt to explore the link between Butler’s recent view about assemblies of physical bodies and the phenomenon of epistemic injustice in the sense articulated by Miranda Fricker (Epistemic injustice. Power and the ethics of knowing, 2007). The talk will be focusing on a particular aspect of public assembliesBy addressing the role of the body in politics in terms of epistemic injustice and unconscious bias, my aim is to show that the embodied ways of coming together are also related to mechanisms (sometimes unconscious) that make us to recognize or fail to recognize a group of people as trustworthy holder of knowledge or authority. Here is a more detailed layout of my argument.

The question of the role of the body in politics seems to be connected, I argue, to the issue of unconscious bias because epistemic injustice often results from prejudices or stereotypes. According to Fricker, the epistemic injustice is testimonial when our credibility is downgraded (by prejudice, gender or race); and hermeneutical when, in trying to make sense of our social experiences, we are left at an unfair disadvantage by a void in the interpretative resources available in our community. This not only causes social or political harm, but also produces a form of epistemic harm and disadvantage. Fricker specifies that hermeneutical epistemic injustice is caused by a gap in collective interpretive resources of a community; for example, when a community cannot recognize a wrong suffered by its members because it does not have the means of interpretation to understand or see something as unfair. My conclusion is that to address the role of the body in politics means to address epistemic injustice, namely the issues of how social identity affects the way (consciously or unconsciously) we operate in social practice and we establish our credibility or come (or fail to come) to exercise authority.


 

Jeremy F. Walton
Center for Advanced Studies in Southeastern Europe (CAS – SEE), University of Rijeka

Merely Political: Agonistic Rhetorics of Unity and Anxieties of Proximity in Ankara

In 1997, at a moment of heightened sensitivity over the relationship between Marxist/materialist and culturalist perspectives in critical scholarship and among the Left more broadly, Judith Butler posed an incisive rhetorical question: “Is the point of the new rhetorics of unity not simply to ‘include’ through domestication and subordination precisely those movements that formed in part in opposition to such domestication and subordination?” (1997: 268). My brief presentation revisits this question in reference to an ethnographic context in which the “rhetoric of unity” is a powerful means of suppressing dissent. In Turkey’s capital of Ankara, an ongoing project, sponsored by a consortium of civil society organizations, aims to construct a shared space of worship for Sunni and Alevi Muslims, a so-called “mosque-cem house.” Proponents of the project have articulated a powerful rhetoric of unity and tolerance, thereby depoliticizing the fraught history of violence that partially defines the minority Alevi community in relation to majority Sunnis. Conversely, Alevi opponents of the project have condemned it as a means of subordination and assimilation. Provocatively, backers and opponents of the mosque-cem house have both dismissed each other as engaging in “mere” politics; according to the logic of this dismissal, “politics” is understood as a figure of instrumental power that is necessarily opposed to the authentic, ostensibly apolitical domain of communal religion and culture. Nearly two decades on from Butler’s signature argument in “Merely Cultural,” the binaries of material/cultural and political/cultural continue to structure analyses of myriad contexts of violence, subordination, discrimination, and dispossession. Ankara’s mosque-cem house controversy exemplifies the entrenched nature of these distinctions. Two related questions immediately arise: How might politically acute scholarship unravel these robust dichotomies? and, conversely, How can scholarship that seeks to break the manacles of such binary categories also acknowledge the claims of informants and interlocutors that are rooted in these very binaries?