Joerg Gleiter

COURSE / PHILOSOPHY AND ARCHITECTURE

Course description:

The course includes perspectives of social and political philosophers and architects on the issue of social inequality in cities and intimately related issues such as people’s quality of life and wellbeing. The assumed notion of cities contains an institutional component (a jurisdiction issue), a spatial component (an architectural issue of housing, density of buildings and citizens, a continuous district of settlement), and a cultural component (a particular state of mind which we call “Civicism”). The main aim of the course is to discuss a proposed model of measuring inequality in European cities (as distinguished from states), and then to suggest principles for policies meant to reduce urban inequality in cities in which the majority of people reside, and some of which enjoy budgets larger than most countries’ budgets. At the course the lecturers will argue for bottom-up moral and political reasoning that avoids both full paternalism and full populism while combining objective and subjective approaches. We will discuss the view that philosophy and architecture should begin with understanding the challenges to policy makers and architects (as creators of the cities) from which they should derive to develop and offer the models for improving the general quality of life. Special accent will be put on the developing the Dynamic Public Reflective Equilibrium as the optimal research methodology aimed to reduce political, economic, gender and other forms of inequalities in the city.

* ECTS points available for MA and PhD students. The requirements for ECTS credits are (i) participation on at least 80% of lectures, (ii) presentation of the original paper on the topic of the course/discussion papers on the papers provided by lecturers

Course lecturers:

Avner de Shalit /Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Jonatan Wolff / University College London

Snjezana Prijic Samarzija / CAS SEE – University of Rijeka

Petar Bojanic / CAS SEE – University of Rijeka, University of Belgrade

Vladan Djokic / University of Belgrade

Idis Turato / University of Zagreb

Sandra Meireis / Institute for Architecture –Technical University Berlin

Zoran Lazović / University of Belgrade

Course directors:

Avner de Shalit (Hebrew University of Jerusalem), Jonatan Wolff (University College London), Snjezana Prijic Samarzija (CAS SEE – University of Rijeka), Petar Bojanic (CAS SEE – University of Rijeka University of Belgrade), Joerg Glitter (Technical University of Berlin) Vladan Djokic (University of Belgrade)

Course Program

Course_Participants

Course instructions for students

Call for Application: PHILOSOPHY AND ARCHITECTURE Course in Dubrovnik

Social Inequalities and Cities is a CAS SEE course that will take place at IUC Dubrovnik from 19th to 23rd September 2016.

Course directors:

Snjezana Prijic Samarzija, CAS SEE – University of Rijeka, Petar Bojanic, CAS SEE – University of Rijeka, University of Belgrade, Avner de Shalit, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jonatan Wolff, University College London, Joerg Gleiter, Technical University of Berlin, Vladan Djokic, University of Belgrade

Course description:

The course includes perspectives of social and political philosophers and architects on the issue of social inequality in cities and intimately related issues such as people’s quality of life and wellbeing. The assumed notion of cities contains an institutional component (a jurisdiction issue), a spatial component (an architectural issue of housing, density of buildings and citizens, a continuous district of settlement), and a cultural component (a particular state of mind which we call “Civicism”). The main aim of the course is to discuss a proposed model of measuring inequality in European cities (as distinguished from states), and then to suggest principles for policies meant to reduce urban inequality in cities in which the majority of people reside, and some of which enjoy budgets larger than most countries’ budgets. At the course the lecturers will argue for bottom-up moral and political reasoning that avoids both full paternalism and full populism while combining objective and subjective approaches. We will discuss the view that philosophy and architecture should begin with understanding the challenges to policy makers and architects (as creators of the cities) from which they should derive to develop and offer the models for improving the general quality of life. Special accent will be put on the developing the Dynamic Public Reflective Equilibrium as the optimal research methodology aimed to reduce political, economic, gender and other forms of inequalities in the city.

* ECTS points available for MA and PhD students. The requirements for ECTS credits are (i) participation on at least 80% of lectures, (ii) presentation of the original paper on the topic of the course/discussion papers on the papers provided by lecturers

Course lecturers:

Snjezana Prijic Samarzija, CAS SEE – University of Rijeka

Petar Bojanic, CAS SEE – University of Rijeka, University of Belgrade

Joerg Gleiter, Technical University of Berlin

Vladan Djokic, University of Belgrade

Luka Skansi, University of Rijeka

Idis Turato, University of Zagreb

Avner de Shalit, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Jonatan Wolff, University College London

If you wish to apply for this course, please, visit IUC Dubrovnik.

Jörg H. Gleiter

Architecture and Philosophy: Nietzsche, Décadence and the Physiology of Architecture

On 19th February, 2016, Jörg H. Gleiter, Professor and the Head of the department of Architectural Theory, but also the managing director of the Institute of Architecture of Technische Universität Berlin, held a lecture organized by CAS SEE at the University of Rijeka.

In April 1888, in a tempestuous finale after arriving in Turin, Friedrich Nietzsche noted that this was the first city that was more “a paradise for the feet” than for the eyes. On December 16, 1988, he wrote in a letter to Heinrich Köselitz: “Recently I said to myself: to have a place that one does not want to leave, not even to go into the countryside—where one is glad to walk the streets! Earlier I would have thought it impossible.”
Whereas earlier Nietzsche, as the hermit of Sils-Maria, had found his philosophical inspirations, like Plato, walking in open nature, now in Turin he seemed to have switched to the side of Socrates. While Plato had withdrawn from the city to the quiet of the olive groves, i. e. to the groves of Academe, for Socrates, as Nietzsche noted, the whole city, the stoa, the streets, and the agora were places to stimulate his philosophical activity. As one could “walk through high archways for half hours in one breath”, in spring 1888 in Turin, just like Sokrates, Nietzsche enjoyed wandering among the arcades of Turin like a “philosophical flaneur”.
Nietzsche’s discovery of the city took place against the backdrop of his turn away from music as a “separate art” [Sonderkunst] of the nineteenth century and toward architecture as the “leading art” [Leitkunst] of 20thcentury’s modernism. Unnoticed in the 100 years of Nietzsche studies finally we have to take notice of Nietzsche’s belated yet highly significant turn to architecture.

Joerg H. Gleiter (Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil., M. S., BDA) is the head of the department of architectural theory and the managing director of the Institute of Architecture of Technische Universität Berlin. He has studied in Tübingen, Berlin, Venezia, and New York. He was a visiting professor at VIU (Venice International University) in Venice, at Waseda University in Tokyo, at Bauhaus-University in Weimar, and at Libera Università di Bozen-Bolzano in Italy. He is the founder and editor of the book series Architektur Denken, and co-editor of the International Internet Journal for Architectural TheoryCloud-Cuckoo-Land(Wolkenkuckucksheim). JoergGleiter is a two times fellow in residence of Kolleg Friedrich Nietzsche at Weimar. Among his publications are Architektur und Philosophie [Architecture and Philosophy] (ed. together with Ludger Schwarte, Bielefeld 2015); Ornament Today. Digital. Material. Structural (in English, ed. by Joerg H. Gleiter, Bolzano 2012); Urgeschichte der Moderne [Primordial History of Modernity] (Bielefeld 2010); Der philosophische Flaneur. Nietzsche und die Architektur [The Philosophical Flaneur. Nietzsche and Architecture](Würzburg 2009).

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