Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory

Fellows at the “TESTIMONY. POETRY. LANGUAGE.” Conference

The conference investigated the concept of testimony, notably war testimony, from different perspectives, i.e., literature, philosophy, sociology and political activism.

The first day of the conference and a roundtable on the third day were entirely devoted to the analysis of the holocaust poet Paul Celan through the contributions of Sue Vice, Pajari Räsänen, Matthew Boswell and Nina Čolović. A philosophical analysis of Celan’s poetry was provided by Petar Bojanić, while Bertrand Badiou was a key figure, providing testimony of Paul Celan’s poetry and biography.

The second day, with panels chaired by CAS Fellows Mónica Cano Abadía and Olimpia Loddo, focused on the role played by poetry in the testimony of the Yugoslav war. A first-hand testimony was offered by the Bosnian writer Asmir Kujović, while Lidija Dimkovska, a Macedonian writer based in Slovenia, paid a moving tribute to a long list of writers that are the voice of a post-Yugoslav languages. Andrijana Kos-Lajtman analyzed the influence of Dadaism on Manifest Mlade Bosne by Darko Cvijetić. Senadin Musabegović described the role played by poetry in testifying the real face of nationalism.

In the panel “Rhetoric, Politics and Poetry after Yugoslav Wars,” Jay Surdukowski showed how Radovan Karadžić used poetry to justify his war crimes. In her presentation To War or to Write, Elizabeta Šeleva described poetry as a means to redesign reality through the creation of an alternative “literary ought.” Goran Lazičić described the rhetoric and politics of testimony in the novels of the Serbian writers Svetislav Basara and David Albahari.

During the third day of the conference, with panels chaired by CAS Fellow Davide Pala, Olivera Marković-Savić showed the use and misuse of the term ‘veteran’ after the end of the Yugoslavian war, and she stressed the legal misrecognition of veterans by the Serbian state. Šeherzada Džafić talked about poetry focussing on war as a powerful form of both testimony and ethical learning, while Selma Zilić Šiljak presented the clash between dominant narratives of war and the horizontal and private accounts of it in Velika Kladuša.

In the first panel of the fourth and last day, chaired by CAS Fellow Mišo Kapetanović, Cornelia Grabner gave voice to the Movement for Peace in Mexico, while Robert von Hallberg focused on the relationship between testimony and poetry in the US. Danijela Majstorović shared her research on the construction of the Yugoslav new woman and the role of the Women’s Antifascist Front (AFŽ). Marzuq Al Halabi talked about Mahmoud Darwish, the prophet of the Palestinian revolution who created a bridge between Palestine and other international movements.

The last panel, chaired by Marco Abram (Osservatorio Balcani e Caucaso), revolved around memorial sites in Rwanda (Matthew Boswell) and the role of women poets in the peace process in Colombia (Cherilyn Elston). Afterwards, Djurdja Trajković moderated a roundtable in which the role of poetry as a form of testimony was discussed. A poetry reading about conflicts in peripheral capitalism closed the conference.

After the conference, the Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory of Belgrade hosted one workshop and two lectures. The workshop consisted in a critical discussion of the important book “Race, Nation, Class: Ambiguous Identities” by Etienne Balibar and Immanuel Wallerstein. Fourteen commentators highlighted different aspects of it, e.g., the relation between race and nation (e.g., Carlo Burelli, Davide Pala), on the one hand, and the link between race and gender, on the other hand (e.g., Mónica Cano Abadía). Djurdja Trajković closed the workshop by stressing the strict historical connections between nationalism, racism, and classism. The first lecture, given by Manuela Bojadžijev and entitled “Is (neo-)racism a form of violence of the past?”, provided a conceptualization of the distinctive features of racism and a great overview of the main literature analyzing racism from the 50’s onwards. The second lecture, given by Sanja Milutinović Bojanić and entitled “Rhetoric of Emancipation vs. Rhetoric of Misogyny”, showed the central traits of the rhetoric of both emancipation and misogyny and illustrated them through the analysis of several historical occurrences of both emancipation and misogyny.

– CAS SEE Fellows

“Race, Nation, Class’: Ambiguous Identities” international seminar with CAS SEE fellows

The coming year will mark three decades since the publication of Immanuel Wallerstein’s and Etienne Balibar’s seminal work Race, Nation, Class: Ambiguous Identities. The book, characterized by a specific ”dialogical” structure, has become influential in the study of racism and in the interdisciplinary school of cultural studies. The publication of the work was preceded by a series of Wallerstein’s and Balibar’s debates at the Maison des sciences de l’homme in Paris between 1985 and 1987. In the course of these encounters, the two authors developed the unique dialogical method, the ”practice-of-theory”, which consisted in the gradual elaboration and intertwining of the three fundamental concepts – race, nation and class – through simultaneous historical-empirical and theoretical analyses.

Wallerstein and Balibar formulate in this study a complex analysis of the roles that the classificatory schemes of race, nation and class played in the process of the genesis and global spreading of capitalism, above all their role in legitimizing the extreme social inequalities that capitalism produces and deepens. Upon the analysis, the authors’ central theoretical claim is that one can identify fissures, ruptures and contradictions in the fabric of the conceptual and empirical inter-imbrication of the three categories, suggesting that any strategy of resistance to forms of social domination grounded in the race-nation-class nexus must identify and exploit these contradictions. The authors finally draw our attention to the fact that the race-nation-class constellation is constantly being reinforced in global capitalism, which also requires constant reflection about new strategies of resistance.

The seminar at the Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory aims to comprehensively reflect on the relevance and heuristic value of Wallerstein’s and Balibar’s study for the present day. Within its temporal limits, the seminar will try to employ the ”practice-of-theory” method of the book in its analysis and attempts at re-actualization. The participants are invited to engage in forms of critical reconstruction, either of particular aspects of the book or its whole, and to explore avenues for the possible application of Wallerstein’s and Balibar’s perspective in analyzing manifold ways in which the fundamental categories of race, class and nation are (individually or synthetically) today used to legitimize or challenge capitalism, globally as well as in the region of former Yugoslavia.

Time: December 18th 2017 at 14:30

Venue: Belgrade, Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory (address: Kraljice Natalije 45, 4th Floor)

Program

14:30 – 14:40  | Welcome Word – Petar Bojanić (Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade)

14:40 – 15:00  | Introductory Remarks – Manuela Bojadžijev (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin/Berliner Institut für empirische Integrations-und Migrationsforschung, BIM)

15:00 – 15:20  | Regional Reception – Marjan Ivković i Djurdja Trajković (Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade)

15:20 – 15:35  | Coffee break

15:40 – 19:00  | Reflections on the Book

Participants

Rastko Močnik (University of Ljubljana and Faculty for Media and Communication, Singidunum University, Slovenia and Serbia), Gordan Maslov (Center for Social and Humanities Research, Croatia), Valida Repovac Nikšić (Faculty of Political Science, University of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina), Nataša Sardžoska (Center for Advanced Studies of Southeastern Europe at the University of Rijeka, Croatia), Vedran Džihić (University of Vienna, Austria; Center for Advanced Studies of Southeastern Europe at the University of Rijeka, Croatia), Petar Bojanić (IFDT), Marjan Ivković (IFDT), Srdjan Prodanović (IFDT), Djurdja Trajković (IFDT), Jelena Vasiljević (IFDT), Adriana Zaharijević (IFDT), Carlo Burelli (Center for Advanced Studies of Southeastern Europe at the University of Rijeka, Croatia), Mónica Cano (Center for Advanced Studies of Southeastern Europe at the University of Rijeka, Croatia), Davide Pala (Center for Advanced Studies of Southeastern Europe at the University of Rijeka, Croatia)

Organizing Committee

Petar Bojanić (Center for Ethics, Law and Applied Philosophy; Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade)

Djurdja Trajković (Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade)

Marjan Ivković (Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade)

Partners

Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade

Center for Advanced Studies of Southeastern Europe (CAS SEE), University of Rijeka

Support

Seminar is supported by Haus der Kulturen der Welt (HKV), Berlin

Testimony. Poetry. Language. Conference

Organizers: Center for Cultural Decontamination, Belgrade; The Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, Belgrade and Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe, University of Rijeka

Time and venue: Belgrade, 14 – 16. 12. 2017

Witnessing is a participative act, testifying is an act of speech with multiple addressees at one time, at the least those relating to the situation testified about, the situation of testifying and a self-address which constitutes multiple speakers. The simultaneity of time and space creates an ever-changing assemblage of singular-plural social relations, intimate and political, at work long after the testimony has been given and each time it is heard anew. The diversity of social relations at the base of testimony makes its relation to reality complex, both that experienced and that in which testimony is heard. This makes it unstable for the purpose of the listener whose demand is for The Truth i.e. a comprehensive meaning which would constitute the person testifying as Subject and/or as a generic Subject as well as constitute both testifying and testified factual situations as Events.

“In our European juridical tradition, testimony should remain unrelated to literature and especially, in literature, to what presents itself as fiction, simulation, or simulacra, which is not all literature. When a testifying witness, whether or not s/he is explicitly under oath, without being able or obligated to prove anything, appeals to the faith of the other by engaging himself to tell the truth — no judge will accept that he should shirk his responsibility ironically by declaring or insinuating: what I am telling you here retains the status of a literary fiction. And yet, if the testimonial is by law irreducible to the fictional, there is no testimony that does not structurally imply in itself the possibility of fiction, simulacra, dissimulation, lie, and perjury—that is to say, the possibility of literature, of the innocent or perverse literature that innocently plays at perverting all of these distinctions. If this possibility that it seems to prohibit were effectively excluded, if testimony thereby became proof, information, certainty, or archive, it would lose its function as testimony. In order to remain testimony, it must therefore allow itself to be haunted. It must allow itself to be parasitized by precisely what it excludes from its inner depths, the possibility, at least, of literature. We will try to remain [demeurer] on this undecidable limit. It is a chance and a threat, a resource both of testimony and of literary fiction, law and non-law, truth and non-truth, veracity and lie, faithfulness and perjury.” DEMEURE Fiction and Testimony, Jacques Derrida

Who testifies and to whom? What are the social relations created in, by and through language and what does language itself testify to? How does language relate to the time of the speaker, the spoken and the testimony? Assuming that presence is the core of testimony how does it relate to its actors? And how does presence become embodied and embedded in language or vice versa? How does the setting of testimony affect its procedure in different times and locations and do interrelations exist between these settings? Has the Holocaust become a paradigm for remembrance and what are its affects in different locations? Do poetry and prose offer a way in and out of testimony, memory and language itself? Holocaust poetry and prose have become canonized as the language of memory, how does it impact the remembrance of the Yugoslav wars and commemorations of other wars?


Conference Program

December 13th | 14:00 – Press Conference at the Center for Cultural Decontamination

Thursday, December 14th

Venue: Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, 1st Floor (Kraljice Natalije 45, Belgrade)

10:00 – 12:00 | Panel 1: Paul Celan as Paradigm of Testimonial Reading and Writing

Chair: Sanja Bojanić

10:00 – 10:30 | The Testimony of Celan’s Manuscripts and Writings, Bertrand Badiou, Ecole Normale Superieure (FR)

10:30 – 11:00 | Paul Celan’s Dialogic Influences, Sue Vice, University of Sheffield (UK)

11:00 – 11:30 | Bearing Witness – One Language to Another, Pajari Räsänen University of Helsinki (FI)

11:30 – 12:00 | Panel 1: Discussion

12:00 – 12:30 | Coffee Break

12:30 – 14:00 | Paul Celan: Testimonies of Heimat (“Ort meiner eigenen Herkunft.” Heimat, Und Ich?), Petar Bojanic IFDT (SR)

14:00 – 15:00 | Lunch Break

15:00 – 17:00 | Panel 2: Paul Celan Today

Chair: Srđan Prodanović (IFDT)

15:00 – 15:30 | The Witness as Agent: Reflections on Paul Celan and Etty Hillesum, Michael Eskin, Upper West Side Philosophers, Inc. (USA)

15:30 – 16:00 | Denken und Gedenken: Reading Celan in the 21st century, David Coury, University of Wisconsin (USA)

16:00 – 16:30 | On the Edge of Text: Traumatic Disruptions in Language, Nina Čolović Linguist Researcher, Serb National Council/ The Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Zagreb and Aneta Lalić, Department for Culture, Serb National Council (HR)

16:30 – 17:00 | Panel 2: Discussion

18:00 |  Testimony: Truth or Politics – Exhibition Opening, Galerija-legat Milice Zorić i Rodoljuba Čolakovića (Rodoljuba Čolakovića 2)


Friday, December 15th

Venue: Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, 1st Floor (Kraljice Natalije 45, Belgrade)

10:00 – 12:00 | Panel 3: Yugoslav Wars and Bearing Witness

Chair: Mónica Cano (CAS SEE)

10:00 – 10:30 | Fiction and Testimony of war, Asmir Kujović, Writer, (BiH)

10:30 – 11:00 | Testimony and Genre, Lidija Dimkovska, Writer (SLO/MAC)

11:00 – 11:30 | The Neo-Dada Face of Postmodernism: Manifest Mlade Bosne by Darko Cvijetić as a Protest against the Cultural and Generalized Disabilities of Yugoslavia at the Turn of the Century, Andrijana Kos-Lajtman, University of Zagreb (HR)

11:30 – 12:00 | Panel 3: Discussion

12:00 – 12:30 | Coffee Break

12:30 -14:00 | Poetry in the Throes of Transition, Senadin Musabegović, Head of the Department of History of Art at the Faculty of Philosophy in Sarajevo

14:00 – 15:30 | Lunch

15:30 – 17:30 | Panel 4: Rhetoric, Politics and Poetry after Yugoslav Wars

Chair: Olimpa Loddo (CAS SEE)

15:30 – 16:00 | The Sword and the Shield: The Uses of Poetry at the War Crimes Trial of Radovan Karadžić, the Poet-Warrior, Jay Surdukowski, Sulloway & Hollis / Senior Fellow Humanity in Action (USA)

16:00 – 16:30 | To War or to Write, Elizabeta Šeleva, Saints Cyril and Methodius University of Skopje (MAC)

16:30 – 17:00 | The Rhetoric and Politics of Testimony in the Novels of Svetislav Basara and David Albahari, Goran Lazičić, AU Institute for Slavic Studies University of Graz (AUT)

17:00 – 17:30 | Panel 4: Discussion

19:00 |  Round table and poetry reading about the YU wars

All participants lecturing on the theme as well as David Coury

Moderator: Noa Treister (CZKD / Ucitelj neznalica)

Poets: Darko Cvijetić (BiH), Lidija Dimkovska (SLO/MAC), Andrijana Kos-Lajtman (HR), Senadin Musabegović (BiH)


Saturday, December 16th

Venue: Center for Cultural Decontamination (Birčaninova 21, Belgrade)

10:00 – 12:00 | Panel 5: Language and Representation of Yugoslav War

Chair: Davide Pala (CAS SEE)

10:00 – 10:30 | War and language, Olivera Marković-Savić, University of Priština (KM)

10:30 – 11:00 | Ethical side of the verse – from work to document, Šeherzada Džafić, University of  Bihać (BiH)

11:00 – 11:30 | The Representation of War in the Performance Arts, Darija Davidović, University of Vienna (AUT)

11:30 – 12:00 | Memory-work Research: Silence and Borders in Oral Histories, Selma Zulić Šiljak i Lejla Somun-Krupalija, independent researchers (BiH)

12:00 – 12:30 | Panel 5: Discussion

12:30 – 13:00 | Coffee Break

13:00 -14:30 | Testimony and Defense: The Poetic Word and 21st Century Violence, Cornelia Grabner – UK Lancaster University

14:30 – 16:00 | Lunch Break

16:00 – 17:00 | Not Losing the Thread. Cruel January – A Month in the Life of Paul Celan, Bertrand Badiou

16:00 – 16:30 | Coffee Break

17:30 – 19:00 | Round table about the poetry of Paul  Celan

All participants on the theme as well as Robert von Hallberg, Matthew Boswell

Moderator: Alexander Pavlović (IFDT)

20:00 |  Concert – Onaj Dječak


Sunday, December 17th

Venue: Center for Cultural Decontamination (Birčaninova 21, Belgrade)

10:00 – 12:00 | Panel 6: Conflicts in Peripheral Capitalism

Chair: Mišo Kapetanović (CAS SEE)

10:00 – 10:30 | Global Resonances and the Movement for Peace with Justice and Dignity in Mexico, Cornelia Grabner – Mexico, Lancaster University (UK)

10:30 – 11:00 | Testimony and U.S. Poetry, Robert von Hallberg, Claremont McKenna College (US)

11:00 – 11:30 | Constructing the “new” Yugoslav woman: a testimony/testament of emancipation at the end of WWII, Danijela Majstorović, University of Banja Luka (BiH)

11:30 – 12:00 | Panel 6: Discussion

12:00 – 12:30 | Coffee Break

12:30 -14:00 | Mahmoud Darwish- The Witness and the Testimony, Marzuq AlHalabi, Van Leer Jerusalem Institute (IL)

14:00 – 15:30 | Lunch Break

15:30 – 17:00 | Panel 7: Memorial Sites and Affects

Chair: Marco Abram (OBCT)

15:30 – 16:00 | Reading Genocide Memorial Sites in Rwanda: Eurocentrism, Sensory Secondary Witnessing and Shame, Matthew Boswell, University of Leeds (UK)

16:00 – 16:30 | Testimony in Times of Conflict: Reading Colombian Women Poets and Peace Activists, Cherilyn Elston, University of Reading (UK)

16:30 – 17:00 | Panel 7: Discussion

19:00 | Round table and poetry reading – Conflicts in Peripheral Capitalism

All participants on the theme as well as Michael Eskin and Jay Surdukowski

Moderator: Djurdja Trajkovic (IFDT)

Poets: Cherilyn Elston (UK), Marzuq Al Halabi (IL), Ramiz Huremagić (BiH), Asmir Kujović (BiH)


Other project partners are: The Ignorant Schoolmaster and his Committees, Belgrade; The Museum of Contemporary Art, Belgrade; Boem, Vienna, Austria; Osservatorio Balcani e Caucaso Transeuropa  (OBCT Transeuropa), Rovereto, Italy; Historical Museum of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Sarajevo; the Faculty of Philosophy of the University of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina; Centre for Cultural and Social Repair, Banja Luka; The Leibniz-Institute for East and Southeast European Studies, Regensburg, Germany

Further information at: http://svedocanstvo-imenovatitoratom.org/en/conferences

*The Conference will be held as part of the project TESTIMONY – TRUTH OR POLITICS: The Concept of Testimony in the Commemoration of the Yugoslav Wars.

Lecture and Seminar with Tamar Meisels and Margaret Moore in Belgrade

Targeted Killing with Drones? Old Arguments, New Technologies
Public Lecture by Tamar Meisels (Tel Aviv University)

Tamar Meisels is a professor of Political Theory in the department of Political Science at Tel Aviv University. She earned her D.Phil. in Politics from Oxford University in 2001. Her primary research and teaching interests include liberal nationalism, territorial rights, and the philosophical questions surrounding war and terrorism. She is the author ofTerritorial Rights (2005, 2009); The Trouble with Terror (Cambridge University Press, 2008), Contemporary Just War: Theory and Practice (Routledge, 2017), and co-editor (with Michael L. Gross) ofSoft war – the Ethics of Unarmed Conflict(Cambridge University Press, 2017).

Date and Time: Friday, October 20, 2017  | 17.00 – 20.00 pm

Venue: University of Belgrade, Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory – Kraljice Natalije 45, 11 000 Belgrade

Introduction: Srđan Prodanović (IFDT)

Moderation: Aleksanadar Fatić (IFDT)

“The question of how to contend with terrorism in keeping with our pre-existing moral and legal commitments now challenges Europe as well as Israel and the United States: how do we apply Just War Theory and International Law to asymmetrical warfare, specifically to our counter terrorism measures? What can the classic moral argument in Just and Unjust Wars teach us about contemporary targeted killings with drones?

I begin with a defense of targeted killing, arguing for the advantages of pin pointed attacks over any alternative measure available for combatting terrorism. Assuming the legitimacy of killing combatants in wartime, I argue, there is nothing wrong, and in fact much that is right, with targeting particular terrorists selected by name, as long as their assassinations can be reasonably expected to reduce terrorist hostilities rather than increase it. Subsequently, I offer some further thoughts and comments on the use of remotely piloted aircrafts to carry out targeted killings, and address the various sources for discomfort with this practice identified by Michael Walzer and others.”

– Tamar Meisels


A Political Theory of Territory
Seminar with Margaret Moore (Queen’s University, Canada)

Margaret Moore is the author of A Political Theory of Territory (OUP 2015) as well as two other books with Oxford University Press, three edited volumes, and more than 50 articles and refereed chapters. She received her doctorate in 1990 from the London School of Economics & Political Science and is a Professor in the Political Studies department at Queen’s University, Canada. She will be taking up the Olof Palme Visiting Professorship at the University of Stockholm in 2018, and is working on a book on natural resources and justice.

Date and Time: Saturday, October 21, 2017  | 15.00 – 20.00 pm

Venue: University of Belgrade, Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory – Kraljice Natalije 45, 11 000 Belgrade

Instroduction: Aleksanadar Fatić (IFDT)

Moderation: Jovan Babić (Faculty for Humanities and Social Sciences, Belgrade)

Speakers: Margaret Moore (Queen’s University), Tamar Meisels (Tel Aviv University), Adriana Zaharijević (IFDT), Marjan Ivković (IFDT), Miloš Ćipranić (IFDT), Igor Cvejić (IFDT), Bojana Simeunović (Filozofski fakultet, Beograd), Olga Nikolić (IFDT), Michal Sladeček (IFDT), Rastko Jovanov (IFDT), Jovica Pavlović (FPN), Jovan Babić (Filozofski fakultet, Beograd), Miloš Marković (Pravni fakultet, Beograd), Aleksandar Fatić (IFDT), Petar Bojanić (IFDT), Srđan Prodanović (IFDT), Mark Losoncz (IFDT).

This talk will defend a certain theory about the appropriate relationship between people, land and the state.  It will explain why her theory of territory is better than its main rivals and the implications of the theory for resource, boundary-drawing, migration, and defensive rights (war). It will elaborate on some of the central claims of her 2015 book.

SOCIAL ONTOLOGY SYMPOSIUM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF RIJEKA

The 19th edition of the International Conference Contemporary philosophical issues: Social Ontology Symposium at the University of Rijeka was officially opened with a welcome address by the newly elected University of Rijeka Chancellor, professor Snježana Prijić-Samaržija, followed by opening remarks by the CAS-SEE and Institute for Social Theory (University of Belgrade) director, professor Petar Bojanić.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Following opening words, professor emeritus John Searle (Department of Philosophy, University of California, Berkeley) took the chance to render a remarkable perspective on how status functions are manufactured in the complex structure of human society, chaired by professor Nenad Miščević, and followed with a likely unique lecture by Maurizio Ferraris (LabOnt, University of Torino) entitled The Color of Money, moderated by Sanja Bojanic, director of CAS-SEE.

The two-day symposium (May 22-23, 2017) resumed with presentations and debates with: Maurizio Ferraris, Jennifer Hudin, Tomoyuki Yamada, Abigail Klassen, Paolo de Lucia, Bojan Borstner, Michael Vlerick, Lorenzo Passerini Glazel, Boran Berčić, Giuseppe Lorini, Edoardo Fregonese, Zvonimir Šikić, Nenad Smokrović, Matija Lukač, Marko Luka Zubčić, Leonard Pektor, Denis Paušić, David Grčki, Iva Bubalo, Alice Borghi, Miljana Milojević, Guglielmo Feis, Aleksandar Šušnjar, Kristina Lekić, Benedikt Perak, Olga Markač, Nenad and Danilo Šuster.

The event was organized by Department of Philosophy, Faculty for Humanities and Social Sciences, Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe, University of Rijeka; Croatian Society for Analytic Philosophy, PhD programme “Contemporaneity and philosophy”, LabOnt, University of Torino and Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade.

Social Justice in the Regional Perspective: Inequalities in the Western Balkans

Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory organised the Round table ‘Social Justice in the Regional Perspective: Inequalities in the Western Balkans’ as a part of the International Conference ‘Social Justice: New Perspectives, New Horizons’. It aimed to provide the space for discussion on the current trends and socio-political process that contribute to increasing social inequalities in the region. Participants provided their personal perspectives on the different aspects of social inequality and discussed the challenges of social policies and desirable changes in the relation to/opposed to EU integration pathways.

Participants:
Vedran Džihić, Director of CAS SEE and Senior Researcher of the Institute for Political Studies, University in Vienna
Slobodan Cvejić, Faculty of Philosophy, University of Belgrade
Mihail Arandarenko, Faculty of Economics, University of Belgrade
Ivan Sekulović, Social Inclusion and Poverty Reduction Unit, Government of the Republic of Serbia
Mirna Jusić, Social Research Center Analitika, Bosnia and Herzegovina
Gezim Krasniqi, School of Slavonic and East European Studies, University College London