Fellows

5 YEARS OF CAS SEE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF RIJEKA

The 5th anniversary of the Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe at the University of Rijeka was held at the at the Rectorate’s Aula Magna on Monday, March 26, 2018.

On the occasion, Madam Rector, Prof. Snježana Prijić – Samaržja, Director od CAS SEE opened the event with presentation of the Center’s establishment course, its development vision and the present ventures. On behalf of Dr. Sanja Bojanić, Executive Director of CAS SEE, Kristina Smoljanovic, Project Associate gave a presentation on the Center’s functioning models, its accomplishments in numbers and also of its core strength – the Fellows of CAS SEE. Following this, the present 7th generation of Fellows introduced their academic backgrounds and ongoing research projects to be completed during their Spring/Summer residence at the University of Rijeka.

The event concluded with further discussions around a joint banquet with the modification of the afternoon program, Fellows and Associate Researchers Presentations at the newly established DeltaLab postponed to another date due to unforeseen weather circumstances which held the Trieste ESOF2020 delegation.

 

 

Spring 2018 CAS SEE Fellowship Recipients

The Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe (CAS SEE) was pleased to host the recipients of the Spring 2018 CAS SEE Fellowship Awards at the University of Rijeka, for the first working meeting. The purpose of the CAS SEE Fellowship Programme is to further the research and creative work in the fields of the humanities and humanistic social sciences in the Balkans. Fellows will present their work within the CAS Collegium, creating an intellectually heterogeneous atmosphere and fostering a productive self-examination or even friction, which may lead to new and unexpected ideas and innovation.

Please join us in congratulating the following Spring 2018 CAS SEE Fellowship Awards, University of Rijeka recipients:

Filip Milacic (Humboldt University of Berlin, Germany) – The emergence of identity politics cleavage and its effect on social movements

Tiziano Toracca (University of Perugia, Italy; University of Ghent, Belgium) – Metamorphosis of Labour. The Movement for a Basic Income in the Light of the Modern Paradigm of Labour

Francesca  Forlè  (Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Italy) – Rythmòs in Acting Together. Reinforcing Joint Actions, Improving Stability, and Orienting Power Hierarchies

Daniela Brasil (Bauhaus-Universität Weimar, Germany) – Emancipatory Learning: New Schools and Artistic Platforms for Social Change

Polona Sitar (University of Ljubljana, Slovenia) – Global Menstrual Movements as New Forms of Social Engagement

Barbara Turk Niskac (University of Ljubljana, Slovenia) – “Life is all about work”: Growing Food as Lifestyle Politics

Pavao Zitko (University of Perugia, Italy) – Ultramodern Man as a State of Consciousness

LIBERAL DEMOCRACY IN THE WEST / THE END OF HISTORY 25 YEARS LATER

PUBLIC LECTURE

by Professor Francis Fukuyama

Olivier Nomellini Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI) Stanford University

Date: 04 July 2017 / 19.30 – 22.00

Venue: Faculty of Political Sciences, University of Sarajevo

Moderation:

Asim Mujkić, Faculty of Political Sciences, University of Sarajevo

Participants in the discussion:

Petar Bojanić – Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory Belgrade, CAS SEE (UNIRI)

Gruia Badescu; Mateja Kurir-Borovčić; Gregor Moder; Marija Ott-Franolić; Nataša Sardžoski;  Marek Silvazsi –Center for Advanced Studies Fellows, University of Rijeka (CAS SEE, UNIRI)

Marjan Ivković – Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory Belgrade

Gazela Pudar Draško – Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory Belgrade

Damir Kapidžić, Nerzuk Ćurak, Nermina Mujagić, Hamza Karčić – Faculty of Political Sciencies, Sarajevo

Francis Fukuyama has written widely on issues in development and international politics. His book, The End of History and the Last Man, was published by Free Press in 1992 and has appeared in over twenty foreign editions. Fukuyama’s “end of history” thesis was an influential attempt to make sense of the post-cold-war world. In this discussion, Fukuyama will reflect on his ideas and if they survived the tides of criticism and political change.

Francis Fukuyama received his B.A. from Cornell University in classics, and his Ph.D. from Harvard in Political Science. He was a member of the Political Science Department of the RAND Corporation, and of the Policy Planning Staff of the US Department of State. He previously taught at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) of Johns Hopkins University and at George Mason University’s School of Public Policy. He served as a member of the President’s Council on Bioethics from 2001-2004. Dr. Fukuyama is chairman of the editorial board of The American Interest, which he helped to found in 2005. He is a senior fellow at the Johns Hopkins SAIS Foreign Policy Institute, and a non-resident fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and the Center for Global Development. He holds honorary doctorates from Connecticut College, Doane College, Doshisha University (Japan), Kansai University (Japan), Aarhus University (Denmark), and the Pardee Rand Graduate School. He is a member of the Board of Governors of the Pardee RAND Graduate School, the Board of Directors of the National Endowment for Democracy, and a member of the advisory board for the Journal of Democracy. He is also a member of the American Political Science Association, the Council on Foreign Relations, and the Pacific Council for International Affairs.

Organizers: Faculty of Political Sciences, University of Sarajevo; Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade; Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe, University of Rijeka; Center for Ethics, Law and Applied Philosophy, Belgrade

 

CAS SEE FELLOWS INAUGURATION

The Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe (CAS SEE) at the University of Rijeka organized the 5th Fellows Inauguration at the University Campus Akvarij caffé on Thursday, March 16, 2017.

The Fellows will stay and work at the CAS SEE premises in the following ten months divided in two terms (Spring and Autumn 2017/2018) and present their research to the representatives of the University, the Academia and the public.


Themes of their research are relevant for the current social and humanistic political debates which focus on:
1.            Making Inclusive Cities: Towards Participatory Governance Practices 
2.           Critical Theory

During their stay in Rijeka, the CAS-SEE fellows will, according to their research themes and proposals, be involved in the work of the Sweet&Salt flagship, hosted by the CAS SEE, within the Rijeka 2020 – European Capital of Culture project.

The fifth generation of CAS SEE Fellows was welcomed by:
Vice-rector for Students and Studies, Full Prof. Snježana Prijić-Samaržžija, Ph.D., Rector-elect at the University of Rijeka, Executive director of CAS SEE, Ass. Prof. Sanja Bojanić, Ph.D., Vice-Dean for International relations at the Academy of Applied Arts in Rijeka, Irena Kregar – Šegota, Development and Strategic Partnerships Director, Rijeka 2020 Agency, Full Prof. Idis Turato, Sweet&Salt Flagship Director (Rijeka 2020 – ECOC)

Please join us in congratulating the following 2017-2018 Spring and Autumn CAS-SEE Fellowship Awards, University of Rijeka recipients:

SPRING 2017

Mateja Kurir  (Ljubljana, Slovenia) Architecture as ideology: the perspectives of critical theory from modernism to the present
Gruia Badescu (Oxford University, UK) Spatializing Cultural Policies and Activism in Croatia and Romania: A Comparative, Transnational Study
Marek Szilvasi (Budapest, Hungary) Between Commodity and Common Public Good: Access to Water and its Relevance for Roma People in Europe
Natasha Sardžoska (Skopje, Macedonia) Mapping of spatial memory in limitrophe cities, landscapes, borders and bodies in Istria
Gregor Moder (University of Ljubljana, Slovenia) Critical Theory. Truth in Politics: Comedy, Sophistry and Critique
Marija Ott Franolić (Zagreb, Croatia) Read, Think, Act

SEMINAR WITH FLORIAN BIEBER AND CAS SEE FELLOWS

Following his lecture at the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, professor Florian Bieber, Ph.D. held a seminar on the subject of current political developments in the U.S. and Europe and the complex life of academia, in dialogue with the fourth generation of CAS SEE Fellows at the University of Rijeka.

2016-2017 CAS SEE FELLOWSHIP RECIPIENTS

The Center for Advanced Studies, Southeast Europe (CAS SEE) at the University of Rijeka is pleased to announce the recipients of the 2016-2017 CAS SEE Fellowship Awards.

The purpose of the CAS SEE Fellowship Programme is to further the research or creative work in the humanities and humanistic social sciences in the Balkans. Fellows will present their work within the CAS-Collegium on a bi-weekly basis, creating an intellectually heterogeneous atmosphere and fostering a productive self-examination and even friction, which may lead to new and unexpected ideas and innovation.

Please join us in congratulating the following 2016-2017 CAS SEE Fellowship Awards, University of Rijeka recipients:

Andrew Hodges, Manchester, UK, Social Inequalities on the Urban Periphery? Vocational Education, Ultras’ Participation and Cultures of Resistance in the Classroom

Marika Djolai, Brighton, UK, When the Rooftops became Red Again: Post-war Community Dynamics in Bosnia and Herzegovina

Deana Jovanovic, Manchester, UK, Industrial Urban Spaces: after Yugoslavia

Carlos González Villa, Madrid, Spain, The Slovene Reaction to the European Migrant Crisis: Class and Ideology at the edge of Schengen

Anton Markoč, Budapest, Hungary,  It’s Not the Thought that Counts: The Irrelevance of Intentions to the Moral Blameworthiness of Actions

Ernesto C. Sferrazza Papa, Torino, Italy, Walls and bodies: a philosophical research on the material government of human mobility

CAS-SEE Fellows Panel in Belgrade

CAS-SEE Fellows presented at the “Social Justice: New Perspectives, New Horizons” Conference in Belgrade (May, 4-6 2016).

Chair: Sanja Milutinović Bojanić

Dane Taleski, Dragan Tevdovski, Trajche Panov and Viktor Dimovski

Socially Impoverish and Entrap: A Strategy to Maintain a Hybrid Regime?

Some theories of democratization argue that quality of democracy and social equality are interrelated. The argument is that if the quality of democracy is higher, then inequalities will be lower because  redistribution in a democratic regime is more fair. Another argument is that if inequalities are higher, then this will increase social pressures for regime change. The idea is that people will revolt to improve their situation. The expected causal mechanism at work is that as people’s living condition worsen they will demand more democracy which, among other things, will deliver better redistribution. Why are then hybrid regimes maintained, if inequality is on the rise?

To answer the question we assume a nested research design. We first make a cross-country comparison and then we present an in-dept case study. In the cross-country comparison, we take countries in transition from East Central Europe, Southeastern Europe and Commonwealth of Independent State and Russia. We measure quality of democracy using the Freedom House Nations in Transit Report from 2005 to 2015. To measure inequality we use World Bank Data for GINI coefficients and unemployment rates. The data seems to support the assumption that if the quality of democracy is higher, then inequality is lower. However, we then take a closer look at Macedonia, a case where inequality dramatically increased, but quality of democracy did not improve. In other words, Macedonia is a case where a sharp rise of inequality was accompanied with degradation of democracy.

The country introduced tax cuts which contributed toward the rise of inequality and poverty. At the same time, the government enacted policies to target benefits to different groups in society. However, the policies did not off-set the rise of inequality and poverty, but made the people more dependent on state patronage. We trace policy development and budget spending to show how policies were designed to target small portions of benefits to different groups in society, not to adjust for inequalities, but to make the people more dependent on social benefits. While democracy was deteriorating, the citizens were entrap. The outcome of the elaborate policy design was to gradually increase the serfdom of majority of the population from the elites.

Dragan Tevdovski, PhD, is an Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Economics, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University in Skopje.

Trajche Panov is a Doctoral Candidate at the European University Institute in Florence, and lecturer at the James Madison University.

Dane Taleski, PhD, is a Fellow at Centre for Advanced Studies in Southeast Europe, University of Rijeka, and Visiting Fellow at the Centre for Southeast European Studies, University of Graz.


Ali Emre Benli

Theorizing Justice in Asylum Here and Now: A Social Choice Approach

Mainstream theorizing of justice in asylum provides guidance in addressing actual questions by first theorizing ideal principles that govern a perfectly just refugee regime and then deriving recommendation based on ideal principles. In this presentation, I first point out that mainstream theorizing is insufficient in addressing urgent and important questions such as the current situation of asylum seekers arriving at the borders of the European Union. The difficulty lies with finding an agreement on the superior principles of justice in asylum as well as regimes that may best implement them. Moreover, in the context of such disagreement, it is hard to create the political will required for their implementation. Then, I offer an alternative method based on Amartya Sen’s work on social choice approach to theorizing justice. I argue that we can reach partial agreements regarding the particular question at hand without reaching an overall agreement on the perfectly just refugee regime. The partial agreements point to ways to improve the status quo. In addition they give us sufficient moral reason not only for choosing one alternative course of action over the others, but also for demanding that others do the same.


Vladimir Unkovski-Korica

City Partnerships as Détente from Below? Twinning Bologna and Zagreb

This talk discusses a project, a work in progress, jointly developed by Dr Eloisa Betti and Dr Vladimir Unkovski-Korica, about the twinning of Bologna and Zagreb in the Cold War. Town twinning in the interwar period of the twentieth century developed as a civic notion to promote peace and a common identity in Europe, especially in France and Germany. This paper looks at a similar attempt to create links between Italian and Yugoslav cities, following the Second World War and territorial disputes following it. Nonetheless, it also argues that Cold War questions differentiated twinning from the interwar experiment. The talk therefore interrogates to what extent the links set up between Bologna and Zagreb can be seen as an early form of détente as various actors responded to the logic of a bipolar world. It also asks whether the hope of ‘détente from below’ was in fact utopian in the context of international economic inequalities, and therefore a harbinger of what we now know as globalisation.


Nuri Ali Tahir

Fighting Injustice Through Health Care Reform: How to Understand Social Injustice and Recent Reforms in American Health Care System

Social injustice and its components are being discussed more often today where state authorities are having trouble to provide equal and fair access to the citizens for certain services. In countries where there are political actors that resist to some regulations fighting injustice, the case might lead to political polarization and eventually defend the status-quo in which injustice prevails.  Recently, with its limited accesss and high costs, US health care system became the most important topic in the American public policy. Problematic access to health care services and the lack of universal health insurance resulted with almost 50 million people having unpaid bills to the hospitals. Democrats and Republicans had huge debate regarding the Affordable Health Care Act which is also known as Obama Care. While Democrats defended state subsidy to help poor people, Republicans strictly opposed this policy and government aid to help defray health insurance costs. The sutation becomes even more complex if we include other people such as legal residents and immigrant communities. This paper will focus on the chronic problems of American health care system and its accessibility by the poor people. Democrat and Republican positions will be evaluated based on their view towards equal access to the health care services by the citizens and other immigrant communities.

Spring 2016 CAS SEE FELLOWSHIP RECIPIENTS

The Center for Advanced Studies, Southeast Europe (CAS SEE) at the University of Rijeka is pleased to announce the recipients of the Spring 2016 CAS SEE Fellowship Awards. The purpose of the CAS SEE Fellowship Programme is to further the research or creative work in the humanities and humanistic social sciences in the Balkans. Fellows will present their work within the CAS-Collegium on a bi-weekly basis, creating an intellectually heterogeneous atmosphere and fostering a productive self-examination and even friction, which may lead to new and unexpected ideas and innovation. Please join us in congratulating the following Spring 2016 CAS SEE Fellowship Awards, University of Rijeka recipients:

Mate Nikola Tokić

Project – title: For the Homeland Ready! Émigré Croat Separatism and Transnational Political Violence in the Cold War

Dane Taleski

Project – title: Post-conflict democratization, transformation of armed groups

Nuri Ali Tahir

Project – title: Controlling the Borders of “Borderless” Europe in the Age of Migration

Ali Emre Benli

Project – title: Towards a more just Common European Asylum System: A social choice approach

Vladimir Unkovski-Korica

Project – title: City Partnerships in the Cold War: Twinning Zagreb and Bologna, 1963-1991

Alfredo Sasso

Project – title: From the crisis to a “Third Yugoslavia”. The political project of Ante Marković and the Alliance of Reformist Forces (1989-1991)

Aleksandra Djurasovic (non-resident fellow)

Project – title: Shifting Urbanity: Rethinking the Inequalities in the Cities

Giulia Carabelli (non-resident fellow)

Project – title: The Ties That (Un)Bind: Affect And Organisation In The Bosnia-Herzegovina Protests, 2014

Francesco Marone (non-resident fellow)

Project – title: The Structure And Dynamics Of Migrant Smuggling From Libya To Italy

 

 

GIULIA CARABELLI

The Ties That (un)Bind: Affect and Organisation in the Bosnia-Herzegovina Protests, 2014

“In this lecture, I will discuss the results of my research on the 2014 mass protests in Bosnia Herzegovina. Overall, I am interested in accounting for the production and articulation of these spaces of rebellion by considering their ‘affective atmospheres’, which means that I am curious about the effects that affect have in the production of socio-spatial relations. In particular, I look at rage, anger, but especially hope as a means to understand how spaces of “togetherness” came to be created during the protests in a country where both “being together” and “occupying public spaces” represent major political and social issues in their own right. I will discuss the extent to which becoming hopeful is also a reason for disappointment, discontent and for the creation of fractures within the movement.

Overall, my goal is to discuss the potential of looking at affects such as hope to account for and explore grassroots protests and radical political movements: how they come into being, how they become movements for creating new spaces of togetherness, but also divisions and fractures; to create and sustain, but also destroy infrastructures of togetherness. Hope begins from encounters and it brings about the question of how new possibilities can be born from these encounters, which involve multiple processes of mediation, negotiation, explanation. And yet, these sites of hope, such as the protests in Bosnia, are the potential signposts that an alternative exists. As Helena Flam argues, we should pay attention to the ways in which protest movements attempt to re-socialise people through (subversive) emotions in order to show that to be angry and to voice concerns is fair and legitimate.”

– Giulia Carabelli