Fellows

Seminar with Snežana Vesnić “Altered Time and Memory: Analog(y) of the Digital”

“My intention is to provide a new theoretical concept of the relation of analog/digital in order to then draw on it as a technology for the creation of new cultural models of the European Union. In a practical sense, I would like to construct a theoretical basis, critically deconstructing the relation analog/digital, with which I will create new contingencies for a virtual production of new cultural conceptions. Nelson Goodman (Language of Art, 1968) formulates the difference between the analog and digital through a parallel with continuous and discrete, distancing the concepts of analog and digital from their origins. In this understanding, a digital system has nothing special to do with digits and an analog system with analogy. The basic distinction between digital and analog, then, is a representation scheme: the digital is differentiated or discrete, while the analog scheme is continuous or dense. In architecture, according to Greg Lynn, the digital is impossible to isolate from the architectural project since the digital is an integral part of its process. On the other hand, Peter Eisenman problematizes the digital as that which possesses no memory.
In this text, I will project the new concept of “altered archeology,” showing that continuity and the production of time and memory are ensured by constant transformations of the analog into digital and vice versa. Thus, the analog gives the digital authenticity, while the digital’s technological potential becomes an arsenal for the creation of (the new) analog. In the final instance, drawing on Derrida’s line that “there is no political power without control of the archive, if not memory,” I will make a digital experiment of deconstructing EU Barcode, the art project designed by Rem Koolhaas.
In the following phase, this model would be applied to the city of Rijeka, aiming to use the results of this experiment in the Rijeka 2020 project: constituting the first architectural laboratory for the rebranding of the city of Rijeka. My purpose is to exploit the potential of difference, diversity and minority as analog reservoir for generating new visions, digital strategies and methodologies of the European project.”

Snežana Vesnić, PhD is an architect, currently working as Assistant Lecturer at the Faculty of Architecture of the University of Belgrade, where she also previously attended the Faculty of Applied Arts. She is a founding partner of the architectural studio Neoarhitekti (Belgrade) and award-winning author, twice nominated for the Mies van der Rohe Award (2009, 2019). Vesnić conducts scientific research in the field of architectural philosophy and aesthetics. She received her PhD in 2018 from the Faculty of Architecture, University of Belgrade, with a thesis entitled “Philosophy and Aesthetics of the Architectural Concept: Object of Reality and Object of Illusion.” Her theoretical work and architectural practice are focused on research and production of “architectural concepts.”

Seminar with Snežana Vesnić was held at the University campus in Rijeka on December 6, 2019.

Seminar with Guglielmo Feis: “Coding for Humanities”

“The talk takes a hands on practical approach to show how a little bit of familiarity with programming may benefit a researcher in the humanities. We are the machines, pcs are our tool. It is our duty to set them properly and use them to do less boring work (e.g.: typesetting bibs) and have more time to actually think and do our research. After a brief presentation of the benefits of this “Coding for Humanities approach”, I showed how Python programming language doesn’t bite and that Markdown speeds up the production of research outputs.
I briefly introduced GitHub as a way to store and track your progress, while collaborating with the world.
I then presented some real-world tools to automate boring academic task like merging and cutting PDFs, renaming files, organizing bibliographies, building a template to write grant proposals, etc.
To show something useful as well as interesting, I briefly touched Montecarlo simulations and agent-based modelling as well as parsing papers to perform some natural language processing (NLP).”

Guglielmo Feis is a philosopher (BA, MA) with a Ph.D. in Philosophy of Law (i.e. Faculty of Law) “experiencing first hand how to conduct interdisciplinary research and getting bashed from both sides. At least it is harder to get bored, working this way.”.
He has worked on impossibility in the legal domain, Ought implies Can, Social Ontology, normativity conflicts and a bunch of other topics (see on Academia or Research Gate for more). “I’ve been lucky to have wonderful co-authors. Now I am actively engaging working on blockchain and the law (and their philosophical relevance) plus the artifactual thesis of law.”

Seminar with Guglielmo Feis in dialogue with UNIRI CAS SEE fellows was held at the University campus on December 5, 2019.

Seminar with Sabino Paparella “About ‘e-selfing’: from self-branding to Quantified Self”

“Whether is considered under the bad aegis of ‘surveillance capitalism’s’ new-panopticism (Crary, 2013; Zuboff, 2019), or as the ‘organized networks’ affordance (Rossiter, 2006; Lovink/Rossiter, 2011) towards social movements, the political efficiency of new digital media however depends on the transduction of a body-individual physical identity in the Netizen’s digital one. We need a digital identity in order to log in the web. Can it be considered properly a representation of our self? Digital technology seems to imply rather a production of the self, by the sound of things. This production of self set up by the digital dispositif – henceforth ‘e-selfing’ – comes by a search for authenticity of the self. One of the main features of Web 2.0 is the rising need for a digital True Identity, endorsed by the claim of ‘absolute transparency’;. Unlike the geek sub-culture of Web 1.0, which was celebrating multiple identity of self by using alias, avatar, nicknames, the interactive digital turn, implemented first by the blogosphere and then by the social media, involves the definition of an unambiguous and verifiable self, which stays always the same and acts predictably, according to a strategy of ‘narrative hypercoherence’ (Ippolita, 2016). We would suggest here to outline e-selfing in terms of disintermediation. Disintermediation usually means the shortening of the supply chain from a producer to a consumer. But what about a system, like the currently digital one, in which producers and consumers are the same (so-called ‘prosumers’)? Put another way, what if the object of disintermediation is properly Self-access, the access to
one’s digital self? What kind of mediation, or resistance, is dropping out in this case?

We will investigate to what extent the output of disintermediation in some strategies of e-selfing (self-branding) could be a decreasing relational nature of the self. Maybe what is at stake in the evaluation of this relationality is the possibility to find something like a ‘digital subjectivity’. An individual becomes a subject insofar as is object of another one. It depends on acknowledging that the very identity is related to being addressed from someone: in other words, what we are is not the same than who we are (Cavarero, 1997). Is the digital production of our coherent, True Self capable of this distinction? If ‘who we are’ is performing in process, through specific and prompt acts, to what extent can it be expressed by the universal knowledge of a computable essence, by ‘self-knowledge through numbers’, as in Quantified Self (QS) digital community? Who I am is contingent, that is to say: any time, I’m who I perform, although I may not to. That goes both ways: ‘who I am’ means the possibility of preferring not to do ‘what I am’ too, like the Melville’s Scrivener Bartleby. This missed overlap, the gap between who and what we are, which some e-selfing strategies maybe risk filling in the light of the transparency principle, conveys the subjectification power, which only makes political an identity.”

Sabino Paparella, fellow of UNIRI CAS SEE, is “Cultore della materia” (assistant) in Theoretical Philosophy at the University of Bari (Italy), where he got his PhD and where he taught in the Master Program in “Philosophy, Politics and Economics in Med (PPE)”. He mainly deals with French contemporary philosophy and he spent some research periods in Paris. He wrote some papers on the political implications of discursive and conceptual machineries.
He took part in the Italian Thought Network and in the “Permanent Seminar of Philosophy and Politics” at Scuola Normale Superiore (Pisa). He worked as journalist and, currently, he is teaching “History and Philosophy” at the high-school.

The seminar was held on December 5, 2019 in dialogue with UNIRI CAS SEE fellows at the University Campus in Rijeka.

Seminar with Dragana Kovačević Bielicki

Mapping the anti-migrant protests in Serbia, Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina through their online media coverage (2015-present)

“The ‘migrant crisis’ in Europe in 2015 and beyond has resulted in an abundance of pro- and anti-migration discourses and practices. The continuous arrival and transit of migrants has been accompanied by rising anti-migration sentiments and reactions. This presentation will focus on the organized anti-migrant protests in three transit countries along the Western Balkan migration route: Serbia, Croatia, and Bosnia and Herzegovina (hereafter BH), in the period between 2015 and present. The aim is to first map and consequently explain the anti-migrant protests that have been organized across the territory of these three countries starting from the so-called migrant crisis and into the present, through the lens of their online coverage. Protests are one of the most visible practices used to express rejection of any social phenomenon, also a practice that tends to attract media attention. Online news media are among the most prominent environments relevant to the reproduction of cultures of rejection and cultures of acceptance alike. This is why, in addition to mapping the protests so far organized, this research will seek to explain how these protests are framed in the online news media, and what experiences and discourses fuel the negative reactions to migrants and migration. Serbia and Croatia are two of the Western Balkan countries that have been prominently featured as transit countries along the Balkan route during the ‘crisis’ in 2015 and 2016. In addition, it is important to include BH in the proposed case study, a currently highly relevant transit country. In the first years of the ‘crisis’ BH was not widely seen as one of the desirable stops along the route for most migrants. However, in 2018, due to the constant redirection of migrants arriving to the Balkans, BH experienced the unprecedented scale of migrant movement through its territory, people attempting to cross to Croatia and further. This resulted in recent widespread media coverage of the migrants’ movement and treatment in this country as well. This presentation will theoretically be framed through the notion of interdiscursivity, seen as the key to understanding how discursive change is related to social change. The interdiscursive context of a text refers to recontextualization of other texts and discourses (Fairclough 1992; Wodak & Fairclough 2010). Digital ethnography is the method I will employ to collect material, while the analyzes of the material will be informed by Multimodal Critical Discourse Analyses or MCDA, most specifically as outlined by Kress and Leuven (2001).”

Dragana Kovačević Bielicki is a migration researcher with background in social anthropology and philosophy.  She received a PhD in Migration, Nationalism and Culture Studies in 2016 from the University of Oslo. In addition, she holds degrees from Central European University (MA, Nationalism Studies) and the University of Belgrade (BA, Philosophy). A monograph based on her doctoral research was published in 2017 with the title Born in Yugoslavia – Raised in Norway: Former Child Refugees and Belonging (Oslo, Novus Press, 2017). She is a returning lecturer in Peace and Conflict Studies at the International Summer School, University of Oslo.

The seminar in dialogue with the UNIRI CAS SEE Fellows was held via Skype on December 5, 2019 at the University Campus in Rijeka.

BOOKS, PAPERS AND REVIEWS PUBLISHED BY CAS SEE FELLOWS

CAS SEE fellows have published (or are about to publish) an impressive list of publications in the period between 2018 and 2019:

Daniela Brasil

Brasil, Daniela and Daily Rhythms Collective. NO FEAR, DEAR. Empowerment Print Bar: making voices visible through printing actions in public spaces. 2017-18 in Berlin, Chiang Mai, Graz, Manaus, Salvador da Bahia.

Brasil, Daniela. (2018) Playful Imagination and Artistic Hospitality: Constructing New Narrative for Emancipatory Learning. In: Sertić, Irena/ Parramon, Ramon/Purg, Peter/ Steinbock, Kristina (eds). Participation: Perspectives On Education/ Participatory Art for Invisible Communities, Zagreb: Omnimedia. ISBN 953-95119-1-7

Brasil, Daniela. (2017) The House of Open Gates: an enclave between the city of Graz as it is, and as we imagine it could be. In: Journal of Urban Culture Research. Chulalongkorn University and Osaka City University. ISSN 2408 – 1213 Vol. 14, June 2017.pp.106-115.

Lina Dokuzović

“Militant Research in the Post-Truth Era”; in transversal, 2019.

“They’ll Never Walk Alone: The Life and Afterlife of Gastarbeiters” (eds. B. Buden & L. Dokuzovic) transversal books, 2018.

Lina Dokuzović, “From Guest Workers to Guest Consumers,” transversal, “Remembering Gastarbeiters: Labor and Migration in the Age of Neoliberalism” (English, German, Turkish), 2018.

Francesca Forlè

Forlè, F. (2018), “The ‘How’ and ‘What’ of Aesthetic Experience. Some Reflections Based on Noë’s Strange Tools. Art and Human Nature”, Phenomenology and Mind, 14, pp. 18-28. ISSN: 2280-7853 (print) ISSN: 2239-4028 (online)

Forlè, F. (2018) (with Elisabetta Sacchi), “Art as Complement of Philosophy”, Phenomenology and Mind, 14, pp. 10-15. ISSN: 2280-7853 (print) ISSN: 2239-4028 (online)

Forlè, F. (2017), “Quale movimento in musica? Integrazioni strausiane all’approccio enattivo di Krueger”, Quaderni della Ginestra, 20/1, pp. 23-28. ISSN: 2240-337X

Forlè, F. (2017), “Where Straus meets Enactivism. Reflections on an Enactive Theory of Music Perception”, Rivista di Estetica, 66, pp. 106-117. ISSN: 0035-6212.

Forlè, F. (2017), Qualità terziarie. Saggio sulla fenomenologia sperimentale, FrancoAngeli, Milano (Book).

Nilay Kılınç

Kılınç, N. (2019). From Vagabond To Tourist:: Second-Generation Turkish-German Deportees’ Narratives of Self-Healing and Well-being. Nordic Journal of Migration Research1(ahead-of-print).

Barbara Turk Niskač

Turk Niskač, Barbara (2018). “A Tale of Two Kindergartens: Visual Representations of Slovenian Children’s Daily Lives in a Rural and an Urban Setting.” In Visual Encounters and Rural Childhoods. April Mandrona and Claudia Mitchell, ed. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press. pp. 147 – 160.

Turk Niskač, Barbara (2017). “Otrokocentričnost in (ne) vključevanje otrok v delovna opravila v zgodnjem otroštvu (Protective parenting and the inclusion of children in chores in early childhood).” In Generaciji navidezne svobode: otroci in starši v sodobni družbi (Generations of Freedom: Children and Parents in Contemporary Society). Tamara Narat and Urban Boljka, ed. Ljubljana: Založba Sophia. pp. 179 – 205 (Zbirka Naprej!, ISSN 2385-880X)

Arianna Piacentini

Piacentini A., State Ownership and “State-Sharing”: The Role of Collective Identities and the Sociopolitical Cleavage between Ethnic Macedonians and Ethnic Albanians in the Republic of North Macedonia, Nationalities Papers, forthcoming 2019

Toracca Tiziano

Toracca, T. Towards Exemplarity: When the Particular Matters, in «Exemplarity and Its Normativity», Special Issue ed. by A. Condello e A. Ferrara, in «Law and Literature», vol. 30, 2018, pp 465-477 (published on line 15 November 2017: DOI: 10.1080/1535685X.2017.1379195: to link to this article: https://doi.org/10.1080/1535685X.2017.1379195). ISSN: 1535-685X , 1541-2601

Toracca, T.  «Regno della libertà» o «regno della necessità»? La narrativa italiana contemporanea di fronte all’ambiguità del lavoro. A partire da: Addio. Il romanzo della fine del lavoro di Angelo Ferracuti, in «L’ospite ingrato», ed. by L’ospite ingrato, 2018, pp. 177-193.

Toracca, T.  Debenedetti, il romanzo moderno e il modernismo italiano, in «Allegoria», n. 77, 2018, pp. 68-93.

Toracca, T. Il neomodernismo italiano, in Il modernismo italiano, ed by M. Tortora, Carocci, Roma, 2018, pp. 211-229.

Pavao Žitko

Žitko, P. Karl Jaspers lettore di Cusano. Presupposti interpretativi ed esiti teoretici, Orthotes Editrice, Napoli- Salerno 2018, 130 pp.


 

 Roswitha Kersten Pejanić

Linguistic Landscape Studies in the Post-Conflict Society: Opportunities and Challenges

Persisting bottom-up discourses of former open conflicts between the different national groups of former Yugoslavia can be perceived in the landscape of the former ‘Serbian Krajina’ in today’s Croatia. Next to legacies of the violent war in the physical landscape (such as ruins, danger signs of land mines, monuments) it is the linguistic landscape of the former war zones that portrays glaring social (ethnical and religious) borders in this previously diverse and heterogeneous area. Instead of a ‘corporate sense’ of Yugoslavia, manifested in the maxim of ‘bratstvo i jedinstvo’, there are still obvious trends of enduring (ethno)nationalism and rehabilitated traditionalist and populist discourses. This seminar will provide central results of an ongoing research project on the linguistic landscape in two rural regions and former war sites in peripheral Croatia, which, next to the physical border between Croatia and Bosnia and Croatia and Serbia, point to the existing inner borders between ethnic groups in the areas researched. The examination of the wealth of signs of ethnic and nationalist tension in the public space (as shown by written messages on house walls, road signs and other public surface) will be at the center of the presentation. The influence of the 1990s’ war and the status of this area as a ‘post-conflict site’ is of particular analytic importance for the research presented. By means of an ethnographic perspective, linguistic signs in public space, their political messages, the corresponding ideological origin and their temporality will be discussed.


Roswitha Kersten-Pejanić completed her PhD thesis about the interrelation of linguistic norms and gender perceptions in Croatian in 2016 at the Center of transdisciplinary gender studies, Humboldt University. She holds a magister degree in History and Serbian/Croatian from Humboldt University and a master degree in EU Studies from the Centre International de Formation Européenne. From 2010-2018 she also worked as a lecturer at Humboldt-University and from 2016 until 208 she was a trainer and tutor for EU application writing at EUFRAK-EuroConsults in Berlin.

Since June 2018 Roswitha is a research fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies – South Eastern Europe in Rijeka, Croatia, where for the next two years she will be working on her post-doc project “Linguistic Landscapes at the margins: Performativity of ethnic belonging and memory politics in Croatian post-conflict border regions”. She receives funding for this project from the German Research Foundation (DFG).

The seminar was held at the University of Rijeka on January 29, 2019.

CAS SEE Fellows at the „Engagement for Social Change: Moving beyond Resistance“ conference

The current, 7th generation of CAS SEE fellows participated in the „Engagement for Social Change: Moving beyond Resistance“ conference held in Belgrade, 19-21 April, 2018.

Francesca Forle presented her paper Rythmòs in Acting Together. A Tool to Improve Stability and Orient Power Hierarchies“ at the “Thinking of Engagement” panel of the first day, together with Olga Nikolić, Igor Cvejić, Sotiria Ismini Gounari and Jelena Vasiljević at the University of Belgrade Rectorate.

During the second day of the conference, current Fellow Polona Sitar presented her paper „Menstrual Movements and Feminist Spirituality: The Red Tent Case Study“ at the “Yes, We Can(‘t): Women’s Engagement” panel with Anna Bednarczyk, Kathleen Zeidler and CAS SEE non-resident Fellow, Monica Cano Abadía presenting her paper on „Risking Vulnerability in Feminist Activism: The #metoo Case“.

The workshop on the book „Where did revolution go?“ by/with Donatella della Porta chaired by Gazela Pudar Draško (Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory) also hosted current Fellows Barbara Turk Niskac, Tiziano Toracca and Filip Milacic, together with researchers from the Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory; Jelena Vasiljević, Srđan Prodanović, Marjan Ivković and Irena Fiket.

 

5 YEARS OF CAS SEE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF RIJEKA

The 5th anniversary of the Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe at the University of Rijeka was held at the at the Rectorate’s Aula Magna on Monday, March 26, 2018.

On the occasion, Madam Rector, Prof. Snježana Prijić – Samaržja, Director od CAS SEE opened the event with presentation of the Center’s establishment course, its development vision and the present ventures. On behalf of Dr. Sanja Bojanić, Executive Director of CAS SEE, Kristina Smoljanovic, Project Associate gave a presentation on the Center’s functioning models, its accomplishments in numbers and also of its core strength – the Fellows of CAS SEE. Following this, the present 7th generation of Fellows introduced their academic backgrounds and ongoing research projects to be completed during their Spring/Summer residence at the University of Rijeka.

The event concluded with further discussions around a joint banquet with the modification of the afternoon program, Fellows and Associate Researchers Presentations at the newly established DeltaLab postponed to another date due to unforeseen weather circumstances which held the Trieste ESOF2020 delegation.