Daniela Brasil

Daniela Brasil

Emancipatory Learning: Reframing Situatedness and the new Cartographies of Belonging
 Seminar was held at the University of Rijeka on May 10, 2018.

  “In this paper we will discuss the first part of The Emancipatory Learning Project, a long-term art-based-research-journey I have embarked within decolonial (Mignolo, Souza Santos, do Mar Castro Varela, Spivak, Vasquez) and post-anthropocentric discourses (Abram, Haraway, Shiva, Braidotti) – while searching for transformative and emancipatory pathways towards the ambitions notion of Earth Citizenship. This research has identified a variety of learning spaces that are playing a decisive role in the construction of a post-colonialist, post-patriarchy, post-capitalism and post-anthropocentric society: learning communities of thinking-feeling and thinking-acting grounded in a deeper notion of Buen Vivir (living in plenitude), that are cross-fertilizing in the globe. The long list includes free- and anti-universities, ecoversities, communities of concern and communities of care, eco-villages, grass-roots social and educational enterprises, socially-engaged artistic projects, happy labs, open platforms, collaborative networks, “autonomous zones” and so on and so on.

In this paper we will discuss how some of these spaces are transforming coexistence and belonging through empowering practices and inclusion. This paper is therefore divided in three sections: The first is a general reframing of emancipation within epistemic diversity, by highlighting the concepts of response-ability and situatedness (Haraway); the second is a definition of dis-othering and unlearning as basic movements towards a form of radical openness that can enable societal transition; and the third section is an examination of these Living Learning Environments as the (new) schools or flourishing habitats where new forms of belonging – emancipated from biological and cultural separations among native and invasive species, re-imagined beyond identity politics within selective inclusions and exclusions – is taking place. A variety of counter-hegemonic gestures of resistance and/or liberation that are enabling small shifts for social change: towards relational and responsive forms of belonging within a more-than-human world.”


Daniela Brasil has initiated and coordinated various transdisciplinary and participatory projects that use playfulness and radical imagination as exercises for active citizenship and tools for people’s empowerment. Her research interests lie mainly on pedagogic, artistic and spatial practices that focus on horizontal forms of exchanging/creating knowledge and know-how; while searching for ways to (un)learn colonized thoughts, behaviours and representations. She studied Architecture and Urbanism in Rio de Janeiro, Environmental Urban Design in Lisbon and Barcelona, Social Sculpture in Oxford and received her PhD and her Master of Fine Arts in Public Art and New Artistic Strategies at the Bauhaus-Universität Weimar.  For the past 6 years, she was Assistant Professor and Researcher at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Graz University of Technology, and from 2011-14 she was a member of the ADRIART consortium for the creation of the Master of Media Arts and Practices in the Universities of Rijeka, Croatia and of Nova Gorica, Slovenia. Daniela is based in Graz, Austria, where she works as an artist and researcher in collaborative settings, especially with the Daily Rhythms Collective on feminist actions and with Studio Magic on experimental architecture since 2013.

Rules without Words #2

The seventh, Summer 2018, generation of CAS SEE Fellows continues investigations into non-verbal normativity. This year’s seminar is reflective of the diversity of themes which may gather under the umbrella of “rules without words”, with Fellows tackling issues of requiredness, unlearning and Laibach. The language of the lectures and the discussion is English. The seminar is open to public. Discussants and audience members from all professions are invited.

 Venue: DeltaLab (address: Delta 5, HR 51000, Rijeka)

◌ PROGRAM ◌

17.00 | Francesca Forlè: “ Requiredness in a World of Facts”
17.30 | Daniela Brasil: “Unlearning How to Behave: Exercises of civic disobedience in and
outside the classroom”
18.00 | Polona Sitar: “The Laibach Phenomenon: Ideology, Art and Popular Music”

Francesca Forlè: “Requiredness in a World of Facts”

In her 2015 paper on value realism, De Monticelli presents an everyday-life case of non-verbal normativity (De Monticelli 2015, 85-86). While visiting Berlin, she ended up in a small park called Koppenplatz, in the heart of Mitte. There was a green table there, with two chairs nearby: the all setting seemed to be a piece of public furniture provided by the city. One of the two chairs was upside down. The author was strikingly deluded when she tried to put this chair in the upright position: the chair could not be turned over because it was fixed on the soil. Indeed, the table and chairs were a work of art, properly a memorial of the war and the Nazi tragedy: that small disorder in that setup was a symbol of a violated home and the violated everyday life caused by the war. For our purposes, the author’s delusion is interesting because it spread out of the experience of something that ought to – or required to – be put in order. The upside down chair of that setup in Koppenplatz required be putting in the right position, and motivated the author to act appropriately. What is that requiredness-trait that emerges from some objects in the world and appears to be somehow normative for the subject facing it? In this talk, I will present Köhler’s notion of requiredness, and how it accounts for normative (non-linguistic) properties in a world of facts.

Daniela Brasil: “Unlearning How to Behave: Exercises of Civic Disobedience in and Outside the Classroom”

Focusing on adult education, unlearning is proposed simultaneously as a pedagogical, artistic and social practice. It uses small gestures as tools to trigger sensitive experiences while playfully and critically intervening in the world. This paper examines the methods used in selected classes I have facilitated in the Institute of Contemporary Art of the Gra University of Technology in Austria for the past five years. Specifically, the classes proposed exercises that open up critical reflections on the social impact of our (in)visible behaviors, choices and attitudes, by inciting students to make gestures that matter: gestures that disrupted normativity implicit in Austrian public spaces. This study brings to the foreground one course entitled “Creleisure: Towards Another Economy of Creativity and Time”, which drew on Hélio Oiticica’s claim from the early 1970s to merge creativity with pleasure and leisure. Creleisure became a motto to de-naturalize normative behaviors and biased worldviews overseen by students in their daily lives, while suggesting that collective joy and playfulness can be meaningful tools for (un)learning practices: inside and outside the classroom.

Polona Sitar: “The Laibach Phenomenon: Ideology, Art and Popular Music”

In November 1980 a poster appeared on the walls of the Slovenian mining town of Trbovlje. All that it contained was a black cross and the name Laibach. With the poster once anonymous musician and art group was noticed for the first time. The name of the group appeared to the Yugoslav authorities disputable at that time as it contained a fascist connotation – the name Laibach was a German name for the capital of Slovenia (Ljubljana) during their occupation in the WW2. The persecution reached its peak in 1983, when the Union of the Socialist Workers Party in Ljubljana banned the group from using the name. Due to the historically disputable name Laibach, the appearance of members of the group in which people saw the Nazis and because of their performance, that resembled the content of political propaganda instead of a regular rock concert, the audience saw the destroyer of the state order in the group. With the music performed by Laibach, the political system and the popular culture are being questioned on the basis of the fusion of popular music and political ideology (with the provocative use of symbols and the aesthetics of totalitarian ideologies). Although Laibach is primarily a music group, its members are concerned with its graphic design and scenography, in the past they were publishing philosophical and theoretical texts, worked with the theater and visual/film art etc. While focusing on the non-verbal normativity through the perspective of studying ideologies articulated through popular music and propagated in artistic practices, this contribution will try to answer the question why the band Laibach breeds anxiety in the listeners, where this anxiety originates from, what its purpose is and what is the meaning of the presence of Laibach in the core of popular culture today.


Event visuals are made by Nataša Janković.

Spring 2018 CAS SEE Fellowship Recipients

The Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe (CAS SEE) was pleased to host the recipients of the Spring 2018 CAS SEE Fellowship Awards at the University of Rijeka, for the first working meeting. The purpose of the CAS SEE Fellowship Programme is to further the research and creative work in the fields of the humanities and humanistic social sciences in the Balkans. Fellows will present their work within the CAS Collegium, creating an intellectually heterogeneous atmosphere and fostering a productive self-examination or even friction, which may lead to new and unexpected ideas and innovation.

Please join us in congratulating the following Spring 2018 CAS SEE Fellowship Awards, University of Rijeka recipients:

Filip Milacic (Humboldt University of Berlin, Germany) – The emergence of identity politics cleavage and its effect on social movements

Tiziano Toracca (University of Perugia, Italy; University of Ghent, Belgium) – Metamorphosis of Labour. The Movement for a Basic Income in the Light of the Modern Paradigm of Labour

Francesca  Forlè  (Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Italy) – Rythmòs in Acting Together. Reinforcing Joint Actions, Improving Stability, and Orienting Power Hierarchies

Daniela Brasil (Bauhaus-Universität Weimar, Germany) – Emancipatory Learning: New Schools and Artistic Platforms for Social Change

Polona Sitar (University of Ljubljana, Slovenia) – Global Menstrual Movements as New Forms of Social Engagement

Barbara Turk Niskac (University of Ljubljana, Slovenia) – “Life is all about work”: Growing Food as Lifestyle Politics

Pavao Zitko (University of Perugia, Italy) – Ultramodern Man as a State of Consciousness

2018-2019 CAS SEE FELLOWSHIP RECIPIENTS

The Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe (CAS SEE) at the University of Rijeka is pleased to announce the recipients of the 2018/2019 CAS SEE Fellowship Awards.

The purpose of the CAS SEE Fellowship Programme is to further the research or creative work in the humanities and humanistic social sciences in the Balkans. Fellows will present their work within the CAS-Collegium on a bi-weekly basis, creating an intellectually heterogeneous atmosphere and fostering a productive self-examination and even friction, which may lead to new and unexpected ideas and innovation.

Please join us in congratulating the following 2018-2019 Spring CAS-SEE Fellowship Awards, University of Rijeka recipients:

Filip Milacic (Humboldt University of Berlin, Germany) – The emergence of identity politics cleavage and its effect on social movements

Tiziano Toracca (University of Perugia, Italy; University of Ghent, Belgium) – Metamorphosis of Labour. The Movement for a Basic Income in the Light of the Modern Paradigm of Labour

Francesca  Forlè  (Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Italy) – Rythmòs in Acting Together. Reinforcing Joint Actions, Improving Stability, and Orienting Power Hierarchies

Daniela Brasil (Bauhaus-Universität Weimar, Germany) – Emancipatory Learning: New Schools and Artistic Platforms for Social Change

Polona Sitar (University of Ljubljana, Slovenia) – Global Menstrual Movements as New Forms of Social Engagement

Barbara Turk Niskac (University of Ljubljana, Slovenia) – “Life is all about work”: Growing Food as Lifestyle Politics

Pavao Zitko (University of Perugia, Italy) – Ultramodern Man as a State of Consciousness

The 7th generation of fellows will start their collaboration with a working meeting scheduled for 23 February, 2018 at the University or Rijeka.

The 2018-2019 Spring CAS SEE Fellowship Awards winners will be announced on March 19, 2018 at a public event following the 5th anniversary of the Center for Advanced Studies founding at the University of Rijeka.