Croatia

Institutions in Action: The Nature and the Role of Institutions in the Real World

Political, social, economic, and legal institutions exert a great impact on the lives of individuals as social beings, as well as on those individuals’ own understanding of themselves, their potentialities, and aspirations. In big societies, institutions also offer information regarding what others do or tend to do. Still, in the last thirty years, both in political theory and in practice, the role of institutions has been seriously threatened by an ideological struggle against the welfare state and by a growing emphasis on individual responsibility and an individualist ethos. Once again we find ourselves having to examine the importance of the role of social institutions, their nature as actors, as well as their mutual influences.

Venue:  Faculty for Humanities, University of Rijeka, Campus, Sveučilišna avenija 4, 51000 Rijeka

Organizer:  Center for Advanced Studies–Southeast Europe, University of Rijeka, LabOnt–Department of Philosophy, University of Torino in cooperation with the Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade

4th CAS SEE International Conference

PLAYING BY THE RULES

Institutions in Action: The Nature and the Role of Institutions in the Real World

May 26, 2016 / 19:00-21:00

Round Table “The Role of Institutions – Experiences and Prospects”

and Opening Reception

Hotel Jadran (Šetalište XIII divizije 46, 51000, Rijeka)

Welcome Addresses: Predrag Sustar (Ministry of Science, Education and Sports of Croatia), Pero Lucin (Rector, University of Rijeka), Snjezana Prijic Samarzija (Vice rector and director of CAS SEE,University of Rijeka)

Introductory: Nebojsa Zelic (Faculty for Humanities, University of Rijeka)

Participants: Erhard Busek (Institute for the Danube Region and Central Europe, Vienna), HE Michèle Boccoz (the French Ambassador to Croatia), Vesna Pusic (Former First Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign and European Affairs of Croatia), Shalini Randeria (Institute for Human Sciences, Vienna), Wolfgang Merkel (WZB Berlin Social Science Center), Ugo Mattei (IUC College University of Torino, Hastings College of the Law University of California), Luc Lévy (French Institute Zagreb), Vedran Dzihic (CAS SEE, University of Rijeka)

May 27, 2016 / Day 1

Conference Venue: Faculty for Humanities, Sveučilišna avenija 4, 51000 Rijeka, Amphitheaters 230, 106, 107


09.15-10.00 Ceremonial signing: Memorandum of Understanding – CAS SEE / Institute of Higher Education, University of Georgia (University of Rijeka, Rectorate, Trg Brace Mazuranica 10


08.30-09.00    Registration (desk in front of the Amphitheater 230, Faculty for Humanities)

09.00-09.30    Introductory: Petar Bojanic (CAS SEE/IFDT), Mario Gioannini (Collegio Carlo Alberto)

09.30-11.15    Plenary Presentations – Amphitheater 230

Chair: Nenad Miscevic (University of Maribor)

RAIMO TUOMELA (University of Helsinki): “Social Institutions, Constitution, and Institutional Status”

FRANCESCO GUALA (University of Milan): “A Functionalist Approach to Institutions”

Chair: Snjezana Prijic-Samarzija

SHEILA SLAUGHTER (IHE University of Georgia): Higher education, Stratification, and workforce development: Competitive advantage in Europe, the USand Canada

11.15-11.30    Coffee break – Faculty for Humanities (desk in front of the Amphitheater 230)


11.30-13.00    Session I with III Panels:

The Legal Nature And Identity Of Institutions: Luka Burazin (Zagreb Faculty of Law); Tiziana Andina (University of Turin); Ana Dimiskovska (University of Skopje); Boran Bercic (University of Rijeka)

Higher Education Initiative Southeaster Europe: Cas See / Institute Of Higher Education, University Of Georgia: Ed Simpson (IHE University of Georgia); Zoran Sušanj (Faculty for Humanities and Social Sciences, Rijeka); Libby Morris (IHE University of Georgia); Lucia Brajkovic (American Council on Education)

The Role Of Institutions Case Studies: Vedran Obućina (Society for Mediterranean Studies, University of Rijeka); Katerina Shapkova, Pece Nedanovski (Ss. Cyril and Methodius University in Skopje); Lina Dokuzović (European Institute for Progressive Cultural Policies, Vienna)

13.00-14.30    Lunch – Akvarij at the University Campus, Radmile Matejčić 5, Rijeka


14.30-16.15    Plenary Presentations – Amphitheater 230

Chair: Igor Stiks (Edinburgh College of Art, The University of Edinburgh)

UGO MATTEI (University of Torino, IUC, College University of California, Hastings College of the Law): “New Institutions of the Commons”

AVNER DE SHALIT (University of Tel Aviv): “Bring Back the Parties”


16.15-17.45    Session II with III Panels:

Playing By The Rules: Brian Epstein (Tufts University, via skype); Nenad Miscevic (University of Maribor); Bojan Borstner (University of Maribor); Edoardo Fregonese (Labont|Arch, University of Turin); Mark Losonc (IFDT)

Hospitality Of State Institutions: Dane Taleski (CAS SEE Fellow); Aleksandra Zdeb (Faculty of International and Political Studies, Jagiellonian University in Kraków); Ali Emre Benli (CAS SEE Fellow)

Vladimir Unkovski Korica (CAS SEE Fellow)

Institutionalizing Studies Of Social Engagement 1: Marjan Ivkovic (IFDT); Srdjan Prodanovic (IFDT); Jelena Vasiljevic (IFDT); Aleksandar Matkovic (IFDT);Edward Djordjevic (CELAP)

17.45-18.00    Coffee break – Faculty for Humanities (desk in front of the Amphitheater 230)


19.00-20.30    Round table – Amphitheater 230

 “Institution-building and Institution-Managing – Between Idealist Goals, Structural Constrains and Permanent Fundraising”

Introductory: Vedran Džihić (CAS SEE)

Hedvig Morvai, Shalini Randeria, Erhard Busek, Mario Gioannini, Libby Morris, Haki Abazi

May 28, 2016 / Day 2

Conference Venue: Faculty for Humanities, Sveučilišna avenija 4, 51000 Rijeka, Amphitheaters 230, 232, 206


8.30-10.00      CAS SEE Boards Meeting, Hotel Jadran


10.30-12.15    Plenary Presentations – Amphitheater 230

Chair: Tiziana Andina (LabOnt, University of Torino)

MAURIZIO FERRARIS (LabOnt, University of Torino): “DOCUMEDIALITY: Documentality-Intentionality-Institution”

ROBERT SALAIS (Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan, Paris Centre Marc Bloch): “From Conventions to Institutions. The Contours of a Pragmatic Theory of Institutions”


12.15-13.45    Session III with III Panels:

Panel 1 Amphitheater 230

Caring Ethics And Institutions: Ivan Vukovic (University of Belgrade); Elvio Baccarini (University of Rijeka); Viktor Ivanković, Zlata Božac (Central European University, Budapest); Nebojsa Zelic (University of Rijeka)

Institutionalizing Studies Of Social Engagement 2: Srdjan Prodanovic (IFDT); Adriana Zaharijevic (IFDT); Gazela Pudar Drasko (IFDT); Igor Krtolica (IFDT); Zeljko Radinkovic (IFDT)

Guaranteeing Equality: Edward Djordjevic (CELAP); Igor Cvejic (IFDT) Alfredo Sasso (CAS; SEE Fellow);  Sandra Bradvić (Institute of Art History, University of Bern); Mate Nikola Tokic (CAS SEE Felow)

13.45-15.15    Lunch – Bar FUSION at the University Campus, Slavka Krautzeka 83A/II, Rijeka


15.15-17.00    Plenary Presentations – Amphitheater 230

Chair: Nebojsa Zelic (University of Rijeka)

JONATHAN WOLFF (University College London): “Institutional Change and Agents of Justice”

EMMANUEL PICAVET (University Paris 1 Sorbonne): “Ways of compromise-building in a world of institutions”

Chair: Jonathan Wolff (University College London)

THOMAS SCANLON (Harvard University – via skype): “Individual Morality and the Morality of Institutions”

17.00-17.15    Coffee break – Faculty for Humanities (desk in front of the Amphitheater 230)


17.15-18.45    Session IV with III Panels:

Institutions And Democracy: Igor Stiks (Edinburgh College of Art, The University of Edinburgh); Rastislav Dinić (Faculty of Philosophy, Niš); Cristina Matiuta (Department of Political Science and Communication Sciences, University of Oradea); Radoš Vidaković (University of Vienna, Austria)

Seminar on the philosophy of social institutions with Prof. Raimo Tuomela – Contemporaneity And Philosophy – Philosophy PhD Program, UNIRI: Raimo Tuomela (University of Helsinki); Marko-Luka Zubčić (Faculty for Humanities, University of Rijeka); David Grčki (Faculty for Humanities, University of Rijeka); Renato Stanković (Faculty for Humanities, University of Rijeka); Leonard Pektor (Faculty for Humanities, University of Rijeka); Denis Paušić (Faculty for Humanities, University of Rijeka)

Institution And Borders: Gazela Pudar Drasko; Stefan Aleksić (University of Belgrade); Nuri Ali Tahir (CAS SEE Fellow); Tamara Petrović Trifunović and Dunja Poleti (Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade); Michal Sládeček (Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, Belgrade)

DANE TALESKI

From Armed Boots to Polished Suits:  A Precarious Predicament for Peacebuilding and Democratization?

“One man’s terrorist is another man’s freedom fighter”

– Gerald Seymour, Harry’s Game, 1975

In many of contemporary intrastate conflicts, armed groups transit to politics when the conflict ends. For example, Shin Feinn in Northern Ireland, UCK in Kosovo, NLA in Macedonia, Communist in Nepal, Renamo in Mozambique, FMLN in El Salvador, just to name a few. This phenomenon is noted in peacebuilding literature; however, there are diverging views whether it is justified or not.

The “liberal peace” theory advocates that liberal norms, institutions and practices should be exported in conflict affected societies to build sustainable peace. External frameworks of understanding are seen as being superior to local ones, which need to be amended accordingly. From that perspective the inclusion of rebels is criticized because it can lead to a “war lord democracy”. The argument is that if dubious actors are able to influence the post-conflict agenda, then it can have negative consequences for peacebuilding in the long term. Others argue that peacebuilding has to rest on the “unique, social, cultural, economic, political and religious context of each country”. Studies find that if potential “peace spoilers” are included in peace processes, then they do not return to fight, but support peacebuilding. Policy approaches are pragmatic. For example, the US Department of Defense Strategic Guidance document (2012) proposes a modest approach to peacebuilding by supporting development of local institutions. Policy studies welcome inclusive peacebuilding and open leeway for inclusion of rebels, and put primacy to “’what works’ at the local level rather than ‘who ought to’ provide services”.

Couples of decades after the inter-ethnic conflicts in Southeast Europe, many of the war-time structures are politically active and relevant. For example, Ali Ahmeti and DUI in Macedonia, Hashim Thaci and PDK and Ramush Haradinaj and AAK in Kosovo, Vojislav Stanimirovic and SDSS in Croatia, and different actors and parties in Bosnia and Herzegovina. It is puzzling to see that parties from war-time networks dominate the minority competition in Croatia and Macedonia, and that such parties are among the main competitors in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Kosovo. However, it is unclear what consequences did their inclusion in politics had on peace-building and democratization? In the paper, I present tentative results from my field work done in Croatia, Macedonia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and Kosovo. I find that parties from war-time networks contributed to peace-building; however, they impeded democratization processes. For example, they utilized conflict’s symbolic legacies as symbolic capital and convert it into electoral capital. In addition, they support social practices to sustain their symbolic capital and contribute toward divergent understanding of the past conflict. These results point out to the dilemma whether inclusion of rebels in politics is morally justified. The ramifications of rebels’ inclusion in politics have implications for the moral culture in the society.

MATE NIKOLA TOKIĆ

“Za dom spremni!” Transnationalism, Diaspora Politics and Croatian Separatist Terrorism.

Of the myriad terrorist organizations that emerged in the late 1960s and 1970s, those supporting the destruction of socialist Yugoslavia and the establishment of an independent Croatia were among the most active.  In one ten year period, Croatian separatists committed no fewer than 52 noteworthy incidents of violence in Australia. Elsewhere—including West Germany, the United States, and within Yugoslavia itself—émigré Croat radicals were responsible for more than fifty assassinations or assassination attempts, forty bombings of public buildings and monuments, and two airplane hijackings during the same time. This talk examines how transnational structures and frames stimulated émigré political actors to first imagine, then develop and finally justify the decision to incorporate violence into their repertoires of political engagement. The talk focuses on how difficulties arising from the fact that the Croatian diaspora existed in ‘landscapes’ as much as ‘lands’ helped define and delimit the repertoires of political action taken up by radicals.  The internal and external pressures of being forced to operate in transnational space led Croatian radicals to cultivate a culture of abandonment, betrayal, and persecution, in which the Croats were portrayed as a nation of victims without allies.  This helped precipitate a radicalization of the separatist movement, as many within the Croatia diaspora increasingly became convinced that only “self-initiated action”—i.e. political violence and terrorism—could hasten the establishment of an independent Croatian state.

Workshop “Generation on the move Children of the 90s in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia, Kosovo, and Serbia”

Workshop Program: Generation On The Move
Description:

The 1990s had a long lasting impact on the children and youth of Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia, Kosovo, and Serbia, that can be seen nearly a quarter of a century after the outbreak of the Yugoslav wars. The experiences as well as the social and political view points of this generation will become the foundation of their roles performed in society and guide their decision-making process. Therefore research studies about the children from the last decade of the former-Yugoslavia will be an important task due to their effect on actual and prospective politics in this region. The aim of the workshop is to get a broad idea of the generation that lived their childhood and youth through the Yugoslav wars in the 1990s. Having now reached adulthood, the question of how this generation deals with their past, present and their future is raised. Though the organizers of the workshop focus on interdisciplinary studies, the essential target is to collect a variety of different approaches towards the generation’s identities, memories, attitudes and values, hopes and needs. We are investigating the generation’s opinions and habitus in terms of their individual and collective political, socio-economical and cultural situations, as well as towards Europe, the European Union and their neighbouring countries.

Organized by Franz Vranitzky Chair for European Studies, Vienna; Sigmund Freud University Vienna, Berlin, Paris; Center for Advanced Studies of Southeastern Europe and partners;  Organization team: MMag. Eva Tamara Asboth, Mag. Christina Krakovsky and Andrea Mesanovic (CAS UNIRI)

In Cooperation with: Vienna Society for European Studies; Funded by: Erste Foundation, Vienna

Workshop venue: Center for Advanced Studies of Southeastern Europe (CAS SEE), University of Rijeka

Program: Generation On The Move Schedule final