Conference

“Peace and Conflicts – Present and Future Challenges” Conference

The conference Peace and Conflicts – Present and Future Challenges (April 16 – 17, 2018)  is set to be held at the University in Rijeka (Campus) within the organizational framework of the University of Rijeka, Peace Research Institute, Oslo; International Center for Ethics in the Sciences and Humanities, University of Tübingen; Center for Peace Studies, Zagreb; and CeKaDe, Rijeka; along with conference partners Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung, Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe, City of Rijeka, Primorje-Gorski Kotar County and Rijeka 2020.


The conference will focus on the state of “frozen conflicts”, along with contributions on the nature of political violence, political reconciliation, disagreement resolution etc. Likewise, the conference will explore yet another cause of internal conflicts within our societies – i.e. migrations and the “Balkan Route”. Contributors to this conference include a wide range of eminent experts and activists from Croatia and abroad.


 For full program information please click to enlarge:

 

Conference Venue: Akvarij – University of Rijeka Campus

Address: Radmile Matejčić 5, HR-51000 Rijeka

 


Fellows at the “TESTIMONY. POETRY. LANGUAGE.” Conference

The conference investigated the concept of testimony, notably war testimony, from different perspectives, i.e., literature, philosophy, sociology and political activism.

The first day of the conference and a roundtable on the third day were entirely devoted to the analysis of the holocaust poet Paul Celan through the contributions of Sue Vice, Pajari Räsänen, Matthew Boswell and Nina Čolović. A philosophical analysis of Celan’s poetry was provided by Petar Bojanić, while Bertrand Badiou was a key figure, providing testimony of Paul Celan’s poetry and biography.

The second day, with panels chaired by CAS Fellows Mónica Cano Abadía and Olimpia Loddo, focused on the role played by poetry in the testimony of the Yugoslav war. A first-hand testimony was offered by the Bosnian writer Asmir Kujović, while Lidija Dimkovska, a Macedonian writer based in Slovenia, paid a moving tribute to a long list of writers that are the voice of a post-Yugoslav languages. Andrijana Kos-Lajtman analyzed the influence of Dadaism on Manifest Mlade Bosne by Darko Cvijetić. Senadin Musabegović described the role played by poetry in testifying the real face of nationalism.

In the panel “Rhetoric, Politics and Poetry after Yugoslav Wars,” Jay Surdukowski showed how Radovan Karadžić used poetry to justify his war crimes. In her presentation To War or to Write, Elizabeta Šeleva described poetry as a means to redesign reality through the creation of an alternative “literary ought.” Goran Lazičić described the rhetoric and politics of testimony in the novels of the Serbian writers Svetislav Basara and David Albahari.

During the third day of the conference, with panels chaired by CAS Fellow Davide Pala, Olivera Marković-Savić showed the use and misuse of the term ‘veteran’ after the end of the Yugoslavian war, and she stressed the legal misrecognition of veterans by the Serbian state. Šeherzada Džafić talked about poetry focussing on war as a powerful form of both testimony and ethical learning, while Selma Zilić Šiljak presented the clash between dominant narratives of war and the horizontal and private accounts of it in Velika Kladuša.

In the first panel of the fourth and last day, chaired by CAS Fellow Mišo Kapetanović, Cornelia Grabner gave voice to the Movement for Peace in Mexico, while Robert von Hallberg focused on the relationship between testimony and poetry in the US. Danijela Majstorović shared her research on the construction of the Yugoslav new woman and the role of the Women’s Antifascist Front (AFŽ). Marzuq Al Halabi talked about Mahmoud Darwish, the prophet of the Palestinian revolution who created a bridge between Palestine and other international movements.

The last panel, chaired by Marco Abram (Osservatorio Balcani e Caucaso), revolved around memorial sites in Rwanda (Matthew Boswell) and the role of women poets in the peace process in Colombia (Cherilyn Elston). Afterwards, Djurdja Trajković moderated a roundtable in which the role of poetry as a form of testimony was discussed. A poetry reading about conflicts in peripheral capitalism closed the conference.

After the conference, the Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory of Belgrade hosted one workshop and two lectures. The workshop consisted in a critical discussion of the important book “Race, Nation, Class: Ambiguous Identities” by Etienne Balibar and Immanuel Wallerstein. Fourteen commentators highlighted different aspects of it, e.g., the relation between race and nation (e.g., Carlo Burelli, Davide Pala), on the one hand, and the link between race and gender, on the other hand (e.g., Mónica Cano Abadía). Djurdja Trajković closed the workshop by stressing the strict historical connections between nationalism, racism, and classism. The first lecture, given by Manuela Bojadžijev and entitled “Is (neo-)racism a form of violence of the past?”, provided a conceptualization of the distinctive features of racism and a great overview of the main literature analyzing racism from the 50’s onwards. The second lecture, given by Sanja Milutinović Bojanić and entitled “Rhetoric of Emancipation vs. Rhetoric of Misogyny”, showed the central traits of the rhetoric of both emancipation and misogyny and illustrated them through the analysis of several historical occurrences of both emancipation and misogyny.

– CAS SEE Fellows

Testimony. Poetry. Language. Conference

Organizers: Center for Cultural Decontamination, Belgrade; The Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, Belgrade and Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe, University of Rijeka

Time and venue: Belgrade, 14 – 16. 12. 2017

Witnessing is a participative act, testifying is an act of speech with multiple addressees at one time, at the least those relating to the situation testified about, the situation of testifying and a self-address which constitutes multiple speakers. The simultaneity of time and space creates an ever-changing assemblage of singular-plural social relations, intimate and political, at work long after the testimony has been given and each time it is heard anew. The diversity of social relations at the base of testimony makes its relation to reality complex, both that experienced and that in which testimony is heard. This makes it unstable for the purpose of the listener whose demand is for The Truth i.e. a comprehensive meaning which would constitute the person testifying as Subject and/or as a generic Subject as well as constitute both testifying and testified factual situations as Events.

“In our European juridical tradition, testimony should remain unrelated to literature and especially, in literature, to what presents itself as fiction, simulation, or simulacra, which is not all literature. When a testifying witness, whether or not s/he is explicitly under oath, without being able or obligated to prove anything, appeals to the faith of the other by engaging himself to tell the truth — no judge will accept that he should shirk his responsibility ironically by declaring or insinuating: what I am telling you here retains the status of a literary fiction. And yet, if the testimonial is by law irreducible to the fictional, there is no testimony that does not structurally imply in itself the possibility of fiction, simulacra, dissimulation, lie, and perjury—that is to say, the possibility of literature, of the innocent or perverse literature that innocently plays at perverting all of these distinctions. If this possibility that it seems to prohibit were effectively excluded, if testimony thereby became proof, information, certainty, or archive, it would lose its function as testimony. In order to remain testimony, it must therefore allow itself to be haunted. It must allow itself to be parasitized by precisely what it excludes from its inner depths, the possibility, at least, of literature. We will try to remain [demeurer] on this undecidable limit. It is a chance and a threat, a resource both of testimony and of literary fiction, law and non-law, truth and non-truth, veracity and lie, faithfulness and perjury.” DEMEURE Fiction and Testimony, Jacques Derrida

Who testifies and to whom? What are the social relations created in, by and through language and what does language itself testify to? How does language relate to the time of the speaker, the spoken and the testimony? Assuming that presence is the core of testimony how does it relate to its actors? And how does presence become embodied and embedded in language or vice versa? How does the setting of testimony affect its procedure in different times and locations and do interrelations exist between these settings? Has the Holocaust become a paradigm for remembrance and what are its affects in different locations? Do poetry and prose offer a way in and out of testimony, memory and language itself? Holocaust poetry and prose have become canonized as the language of memory, how does it impact the remembrance of the Yugoslav wars and commemorations of other wars?


Conference Program

December 13th | 14:00 – Press Conference at the Center for Cultural Decontamination

Thursday, December 14th

Venue: Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, 1st Floor (Kraljice Natalije 45, Belgrade)

10:00 – 12:00 | Panel 1: Paul Celan as Paradigm of Testimonial Reading and Writing

Chair: Sanja Bojanić

10:00 – 10:30 | The Testimony of Celan’s Manuscripts and Writings, Bertrand Badiou, Ecole Normale Superieure (FR)

10:30 – 11:00 | Paul Celan’s Dialogic Influences, Sue Vice, University of Sheffield (UK)

11:00 – 11:30 | Bearing Witness – One Language to Another, Pajari Räsänen University of Helsinki (FI)

11:30 – 12:00 | Panel 1: Discussion

12:00 – 12:30 | Coffee Break

12:30 – 14:00 | Paul Celan: Testimonies of Heimat (“Ort meiner eigenen Herkunft.” Heimat, Und Ich?), Petar Bojanic IFDT (SR)

14:00 – 15:00 | Lunch Break

15:00 – 17:00 | Panel 2: Paul Celan Today

Chair: Srđan Prodanović (IFDT)

15:00 – 15:30 | The Witness as Agent: Reflections on Paul Celan and Etty Hillesum, Michael Eskin, Upper West Side Philosophers, Inc. (USA)

15:30 – 16:00 | Denken und Gedenken: Reading Celan in the 21st century, David Coury, University of Wisconsin (USA)

16:00 – 16:30 | On the Edge of Text: Traumatic Disruptions in Language, Nina Čolović Linguist Researcher, Serb National Council/ The Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Zagreb and Aneta Lalić, Department for Culture, Serb National Council (HR)

16:30 – 17:00 | Panel 2: Discussion

18:00 |  Testimony: Truth or Politics – Exhibition Opening, Galerija-legat Milice Zorić i Rodoljuba Čolakovića (Rodoljuba Čolakovića 2)


Friday, December 15th

Venue: Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, 1st Floor (Kraljice Natalije 45, Belgrade)

10:00 – 12:00 | Panel 3: Yugoslav Wars and Bearing Witness

Chair: Mónica Cano (CAS SEE)

10:00 – 10:30 | Fiction and Testimony of war, Asmir Kujović, Writer, (BiH)

10:30 – 11:00 | Testimony and Genre, Lidija Dimkovska, Writer (SLO/MAC)

11:00 – 11:30 | The Neo-Dada Face of Postmodernism: Manifest Mlade Bosne by Darko Cvijetić as a Protest against the Cultural and Generalized Disabilities of Yugoslavia at the Turn of the Century, Andrijana Kos-Lajtman, University of Zagreb (HR)

11:30 – 12:00 | Panel 3: Discussion

12:00 – 12:30 | Coffee Break

12:30 -14:00 | Poetry in the Throes of Transition, Senadin Musabegović, Head of the Department of History of Art at the Faculty of Philosophy in Sarajevo

14:00 – 15:30 | Lunch

15:30 – 17:30 | Panel 4: Rhetoric, Politics and Poetry after Yugoslav Wars

Chair: Olimpa Loddo (CAS SEE)

15:30 – 16:00 | The Sword and the Shield: The Uses of Poetry at the War Crimes Trial of Radovan Karadžić, the Poet-Warrior, Jay Surdukowski, Sulloway & Hollis / Senior Fellow Humanity in Action (USA)

16:00 – 16:30 | To War or to Write, Elizabeta Šeleva, Saints Cyril and Methodius University of Skopje (MAC)

16:30 – 17:00 | The Rhetoric and Politics of Testimony in the Novels of Svetislav Basara and David Albahari, Goran Lazičić, AU Institute for Slavic Studies University of Graz (AUT)

17:00 – 17:30 | Panel 4: Discussion

19:00 |  Round table and poetry reading about the YU wars

All participants lecturing on the theme as well as David Coury

Moderator: Noa Treister (CZKD / Ucitelj neznalica)

Poets: Darko Cvijetić (BiH), Lidija Dimkovska (SLO/MAC), Andrijana Kos-Lajtman (HR), Senadin Musabegović (BiH)


Saturday, December 16th

Venue: Center for Cultural Decontamination (Birčaninova 21, Belgrade)

10:00 – 12:00 | Panel 5: Language and Representation of Yugoslav War

Chair: Davide Pala (CAS SEE)

10:00 – 10:30 | War and language, Olivera Marković-Savić, University of Priština (KM)

10:30 – 11:00 | Ethical side of the verse – from work to document, Šeherzada Džafić, University of  Bihać (BiH)

11:00 – 11:30 | The Representation of War in the Performance Arts, Darija Davidović, University of Vienna (AUT)

11:30 – 12:00 | Memory-work Research: Silence and Borders in Oral Histories, Selma Zulić Šiljak i Lejla Somun-Krupalija, independent researchers (BiH)

12:00 – 12:30 | Panel 5: Discussion

12:30 – 13:00 | Coffee Break

13:00 -14:30 | Testimony and Defense: The Poetic Word and 21st Century Violence, Cornelia Grabner – UK Lancaster University

14:30 – 16:00 | Lunch Break

16:00 – 17:00 | Not Losing the Thread. Cruel January – A Month in the Life of Paul Celan, Bertrand Badiou

16:00 – 16:30 | Coffee Break

17:30 – 19:00 | Round table about the poetry of Paul  Celan

All participants on the theme as well as Robert von Hallberg, Matthew Boswell

Moderator: Alexander Pavlović (IFDT)

20:00 |  Concert – Onaj Dječak


Sunday, December 17th

Venue: Center for Cultural Decontamination (Birčaninova 21, Belgrade)

10:00 – 12:00 | Panel 6: Conflicts in Peripheral Capitalism

Chair: Mišo Kapetanović (CAS SEE)

10:00 – 10:30 | Global Resonances and the Movement for Peace with Justice and Dignity in Mexico, Cornelia Grabner – Mexico, Lancaster University (UK)

10:30 – 11:00 | Testimony and U.S. Poetry, Robert von Hallberg, Claremont McKenna College (US)

11:00 – 11:30 | Constructing the “new” Yugoslav woman: a testimony/testament of emancipation at the end of WWII, Danijela Majstorović, University of Banja Luka (BiH)

11:30 – 12:00 | Panel 6: Discussion

12:00 – 12:30 | Coffee Break

12:30 -14:00 | Mahmoud Darwish- The Witness and the Testimony, Marzuq AlHalabi, Van Leer Jerusalem Institute (IL)

14:00 – 15:30 | Lunch Break

15:30 – 17:00 | Panel 7: Memorial Sites and Affects

Chair: Marco Abram (OBCT)

15:30 – 16:00 | Reading Genocide Memorial Sites in Rwanda: Eurocentrism, Sensory Secondary Witnessing and Shame, Matthew Boswell, University of Leeds (UK)

16:00 – 16:30 | Testimony in Times of Conflict: Reading Colombian Women Poets and Peace Activists, Cherilyn Elston, University of Reading (UK)

16:30 – 17:00 | Panel 7: Discussion

19:00 | Round table and poetry reading – Conflicts in Peripheral Capitalism

All participants on the theme as well as Michael Eskin and Jay Surdukowski

Moderator: Djurdja Trajkovic (IFDT)

Poets: Cherilyn Elston (UK), Marzuq Al Halabi (IL), Ramiz Huremagić (BiH), Asmir Kujović (BiH)


Other project partners are: The Ignorant Schoolmaster and his Committees, Belgrade; The Museum of Contemporary Art, Belgrade; Boem, Vienna, Austria; Osservatorio Balcani e Caucaso Transeuropa  (OBCT Transeuropa), Rovereto, Italy; Historical Museum of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Sarajevo; the Faculty of Philosophy of the University of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina; Centre for Cultural and Social Repair, Banja Luka; The Leibniz-Institute for East and Southeast European Studies, Regensburg, Germany

Further information at: http://svedocanstvo-imenovatitoratom.org/en/conferences

*The Conference will be held as part of the project TESTIMONY – TRUTH OR POLITICS: The Concept of Testimony in the Commemoration of the Yugoslav Wars.

Conference “Cultures in translation: a paradigm for Europe”

Culture in traduzione: un paradigma per l’Europa | Kulture u prijevodu: paradigma za Europu

 Date: 18-19 October 2017, Belgrade

Venue: Italian Culture Institute in Belgrade

Languages: English, Italian and Serbian

Translation: Simultaneous

PROVISIONAL PROGRAMME:
Day 1  |  18 October 2017

9.00-10.00 | Registration of participants and welcome coffee

10.00-10.30 | Opening lecture

⌑ Petar Bojanic, IFDT (10 min)

⌑ Davide Scalmani, IIC (10 min)

⌑ Irena Fiket (10 min)

I         Translatability and Untranslatables: Examples and Reflections

10.30-12.30 | Moderator: Milos Cipranic

Speakers:

10.30-11.00 | Snežana Milinković, University of Belgrade, Professor of Italian literature and translator (Tradurre è impossibile ma necessario) language: Italian

11.00-11.30 | Annette Đurović, University of Belgrade (Od „Personenkennzahl“-a do „Personenkennziffer“-a ili Put između raspada dva sistema u budućnost) language: Serbian

11.30-12.00 | Deja Piletic, University of Montenegro (I dottori del triennio – doktori trogodišnjih studija? Le sfide della traduzione giurata dall’italiano in montenegrino e viceversa) language: Italian

12.00-12.30 | Discussion

12.30-14.00 | Buffet Lunch

II      Philosophy in Translation: Translation as a Philosophical Problem

14.00-17.00 | Moderator: Sasa Hrnjez

Speakers:

14.00-14.30 | Luca Illetterati, University of Padova, Professor of Theoretical Philosophy (Animali che traducono) language: Italian

14.30-15.00 | Adriana Zaharijevic, IFDT, Member of Association of Literary Translators of Serbia (Prevođenje filozofije: slučaj pojma agency) language: Serbian

15-15.30 | Discusssion

15.30-16.00 | Gaetano Chiurazzi, University of Torino, Professor of Theoretical Philosophy (La storicità della traduzione) language: Italian

16.00-16.30 | Zdravko Kobe, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia (Traduzione e trasformazione) language: Italian

16.30-17.00  | Discussion

20.00 | Dinner (Restaurant Savski Venac)

Day 2  |  19 October 2017
III      Translation, Interculturality and European Identity Politics

9.30-13.30 | Moderator: Burelli Carlo

Speakers:

9.30-10.00 | Aleksandra Mančić, Senior Research Associate – Institute for Literature and Arts, Belgrade and translator – Member of Association of Literary Translators of Serbia (Translation as Intercultural Practice and its Relevance for the Future of Europe) language: Serbian

10.00-10.30 | Silvana Borutti, Pavia, Professor of Theoretical Philosophy (L’antropologia e la traduzione come modello della comunicazione interculturale) language: Italian

10.30-11.00 | Discusssion

11.00-11.30 | Djurdja Trajkovic, IFDT (Madness of Pierre Menard: Power of the Untranslatable) language: English

11.30-12.00 | Michael Oustinoff, literary critic and theorist of translation, Professor at the University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, France (Globalization and the Translation of Imaginaries)

12.00-12.30 | Olimpia Giuliana Loddo, The Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe (CAS SEE) Rijeka, University of Cagliari (Translating written norms into normative pictures) language: English

12.30-13.30 | Discussion

13.30-14.30 | Buffet Lunch

IV     Actuality of Translation – Translation as Activity

14.30-17.00 | Moderator: Davide Pala

Speakers:

14.30-15.00 | Gojko Bozovic, Arhipelag, Beograd (Izazovi savremenog prevođenja i savremenog izdavaštva) language: Serbian

15.00-15.30 | Mirna Zelic Pokaz, Head of Croatian Language Department, DGT EC (Translating for the European Commission) language: English

15.30-16.00 | Katja Stergar, Slovenian Book Agency JAK/Traduki / Antje Contius, S. Fischer Stiftung/Traduki (Traduki’s work and implications) language: English

16.00-16.30 | Discussion

16.30-17.00 | Conclusion of the conference

Davide Scalmani, IIC

EUNIC Serbia representative (name still TBC)

20.00 | Dinner (Restaurant in Skadarlija)

LIBERAL DEMOCRACY IN THE WEST / THE END OF HISTORY 25 YEARS LATER

PUBLIC LECTURE

by Professor Francis Fukuyama

Olivier Nomellini Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI) Stanford University

Date: 04 July 2017 / 19.30 – 22.00

Venue: Faculty of Political Sciences, University of Sarajevo

Moderation:

Asim Mujkić, Faculty of Political Sciences, University of Sarajevo

Participants in the discussion:

Petar Bojanić – Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory Belgrade, CAS SEE (UNIRI)

Gruia Badescu; Mateja Kurir-Borovčić; Gregor Moder; Marija Ott-Franolić; Nataša Sardžoski;  Marek Silvazsi –Center for Advanced Studies Fellows, University of Rijeka (CAS SEE, UNIRI)

Marjan Ivković – Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory Belgrade

Gazela Pudar Draško – Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory Belgrade

Damir Kapidžić, Nerzuk Ćurak, Nermina Mujagić, Hamza Karčić – Faculty of Political Sciencies, Sarajevo

Francis Fukuyama has written widely on issues in development and international politics. His book, The End of History and the Last Man, was published by Free Press in 1992 and has appeared in over twenty foreign editions. Fukuyama’s “end of history” thesis was an influential attempt to make sense of the post-cold-war world. In this discussion, Fukuyama will reflect on his ideas and if they survived the tides of criticism and political change.

Francis Fukuyama received his B.A. from Cornell University in classics, and his Ph.D. from Harvard in Political Science. He was a member of the Political Science Department of the RAND Corporation, and of the Policy Planning Staff of the US Department of State. He previously taught at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) of Johns Hopkins University and at George Mason University’s School of Public Policy. He served as a member of the President’s Council on Bioethics from 2001-2004. Dr. Fukuyama is chairman of the editorial board of The American Interest, which he helped to found in 2005. He is a senior fellow at the Johns Hopkins SAIS Foreign Policy Institute, and a non-resident fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and the Center for Global Development. He holds honorary doctorates from Connecticut College, Doane College, Doshisha University (Japan), Kansai University (Japan), Aarhus University (Denmark), and the Pardee Rand Graduate School. He is a member of the Board of Governors of the Pardee RAND Graduate School, the Board of Directors of the National Endowment for Democracy, and a member of the advisory board for the Journal of Democracy. He is also a member of the American Political Science Association, the Council on Foreign Relations, and the Pacific Council for International Affairs.

Organizers: Faculty of Political Sciences, University of Sarajevo; Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade; Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe, University of Rijeka; Center for Ethics, Law and Applied Philosophy, Belgrade

 

CAS SEE FELLOWS PANEL IN VIENNA

The second day of the Aktionstage: Refugees – Migration – Democracy Symposium held at the Akademie der bildenden Künste Wien hosted a panel with the 4th generation of CAS-SEE Fellows. CAS-SEE Director Petar Bojanic provided Input on the subject of Europe, Refugees, Hospitality, Destitution.
The 6th panel of the Symposium, entitled Towards a new research agenda: Debate and exchange on current topics and critical junctures for thinking and researching in the field of refugees, migration and democracy, hosted young speakers that provided fresh perspectives on the subject.

Panelists:
• Mariana Fragkou (Greek Council for Refugees, Athens),
• Andjelka Pantović (Asylum Protection Centre, Belgrade),
• Sanja Bojanić (CAS SEE, University of Rijeka),
• Kevin Hinterberger (IWM, University of Vienna), Ilker Ataç (University of Vienna),
• Ernesto C. Sferrazza Papa (CAS SEE Fellow, Rijeka/Torino)
• Deana Jovanović (CAS SEE Fellow)
• Carlos González Villa (CAS SEE Fellow)
• Andrew Hodges (CAS SEE Fellow)
• Anton Markoč (CAS SEE Fellow)
Moderation: Heide Hammer (Refugee Convoy – Schienenersatzverkehr für Flüchtlinge, Vienna)

Foto:  Sabine Schwaighofer, Initiative Minderheiten | Kristina Smoljanovic, CAS SEE

Aktionstage: Refugees – Migration – Democracy

The first panel of the Aktionstage: Refugees – Migration – Democracy Symposium held at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna, entitled (Not) Learning from history, part I: Yugoslav refugee crisis – how Europe dealt with it from left to right, moderated by Vedran Džihić (CAS SEE, University of Rijeka, oiip, Vienna) included the presentations of Zoran Slavinić (REMESO, Linköping University), Branka Likić-­Brborić (REMESO, Linköping University) and Melita H. Sunjic (UNHCR, Vienna) that engaged both listeners and speakers in debates on the changing nature of European democracy in the midst of the ongoing refugee crisis.

The second panel, (Not) Learning from history, part II: Integration and democracy from left to right, moderated by Sanja Bojanić (CAS SEE, University of Rijeka) delt with the nature of the contemporary demos. The panel provided experts from various disciplines: Ilker Ataç (University of Vienna), Gudrun Biffl (Danube University Krems), Holly Case (IWM, Brown University) and Li Bennich-­Björkman (Department of Government, Uppsala University) with the opportunity to offer sensible and culturally diverse outlooks on political participation, contribution and agency. Their explorations of the topics of political optimism, institutional control and emotional engagement provided a fascinating basis for further discussions about the proper response to the refugee crisis.

The third panel, Demos – Who belongs to the political community? moderated by Gerd Valchars (Initiative Minderheiten, Vienna) included presentations of Hedvig Morvai (European Fund for the Balkans, Belgrade), Katharine Sarikakis (University of Vienna) and Snježana Prijić-­Samaržija (CAS SEE, University of Rijeka).

Snjezana Prijic-Samarzija

At the conference, the co-director of the Center for Advanced Studies SEE, professor Snježana Prijić-Samaržija presented her answer to the problem of belonging to a political community. Prijić-Samaržija’s presentation approached the issue of migration from an institutional perspective, questioning the legitimacy of someone’s right to impose limits on the freedom of movement. Throughout the speech, she explored the legitimacy of unilateral prohibitive decisions made by particular states and the implications of their unsustainable one-dimensionality, juxtaposing them with the notion of migration as a basic human right. Should we choose to view the right to seek better political and economic conditions as a manifestation of contemporary social mobility, we would need to address the option that nobody can legitimately limit the movement of others. Striving to reach a balanced conclusion, Prijić-Samaržija proposed delegating the issue of migrations to international institutions capable of adjusting the subjective interests of particular states to the interests of migrants. Relating to the broader topic of the conference, she emphasized the necessary hierarchy of urgency between the migration of genuine refugees, low-skilled workers escaping poverty and high-skilled experts seeking better payment. Her presentation incited many responses from the audience, leading to a discussion about the nature of credible international institutions and the danger of excessive euro centrism.

AKTIONSTAGE: REFUGEES – MIGRATION – DEMOCRACY

While most European states are not able to create humane conditions for those who have fled war zone sin the Near East in recent years, the dedication of Europe’s civil society proves that solidarity is alive and that the vision of a democratic Europe will not be abandoned. Community action – whether in smaller communities or in larger cities – is becoming a guiding principle for many. As a result, actions and organizations from civil society strongly infulence European democracies, changing and reshaping them.

What kind of potential do these actions of civil society hold for the advancement of European democracies in connection with the most recent refugee movement? What can be learned from historical experiences with the wars in Yugoslavia, but also from current experiences in Sweden? How is the refugee movement changing European democracies and what can be learned from civil society’s activities, which have been emerging since last year?

The AKTIONSTAGE: REFUGEES – MIGRATION – DEMOCRACY, which are being supported by a number of organizations, are dedicated to exploring these questions from a theoretical and practical perspective and are attempting to understand the current situation through historical and geographic comparisons.

Find more information on the Aktionstage conference program and events here.

Organized by Initiative Minderheiten, Center for Advanced Studies South Eastern Europe (CAS SEE), ERSTE Stiftung, Institut für die Wissenschaften vom Menschen (IWM), Asylkoordination österreich, arge region kultur, GBW Minderheiten and Interkulturelles Zentrum (iz), Karl-Renner-Institut.

In cooperation with ÖBB-Holding, Akademie der bildenden Künste Wien, Stadtkino im Künstlerhaus, REMESO (Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society, Linköping University), oiip – Österreichisches Institut für Internationale Politik, IDM (The Institute for the Danube Region and Central Europe) and Donau-Universität Krems.

New Europe College – Institute for Advanced Studies’ “Refugees, Migrants and Cosmo-Politics” Conference in Bucharest

Petar Bojanic (CAS SEE, Belgrade Institute for Philosphy and Social Theory) gave a keynote lecture On Counter-Institution. Europe, Refuge, Hospitality, Destitution (Chair: Dan Lazea), on June 4th at the Refugees, Migrants and Cosmo-Politics Conference in Bucharest, organized by the New Europe (more…)

Round Table “The Role of Institutions – Experiences and Prospects” and Opening Reception

 In the past forty years we have been witnessing a decline of public institutions in various areas. First, decline of institutions of welfare state. Second, decline of democratic institutions. There has been much talk recently of democratic deficit, particularly at EU level. Many public institutions that provided public (more…)