Cold War

VLADIMIR UNKOVSKI-KORICA

City Partnerships as Détente from Below? Twinning Bologna and Zagreb

This talk discusses a project, a work in progress, jointly developed by Dr Eloisa Betti and Dr Vladimir Unkovski-Korica, about the twinning of Bologna and Zagreb in the Cold War. Town twinning in the interwar period of the twentieth century has been called ‘Locarno from below’, an attempt to normalise relations in a continent ravaged by a world war. Named after the Locarno Treaties of 1925, which settled borders and promised mutual non-aggression in Europe. ‘Locarno from below’ related to attempts to use town twinning to educate populations in the spirit of partnership. Since this failed to prevent another war, why did town twinning recover after the Second World War and in the thick of the Cold War? Moreover, why concentrate on Bologna and Zagreb? This talk discusses town twinning as an attempt at overcoming several emblematic problems: improving relations between two states with recent border disputes and war; improving economic links as a bridge across political divisions; internationalising ‘municipal socialism’ as a road to national power; and increasing regional autonomies using city initiatives against the strait-jacket of nation-states. The talk therefore interrogates to what extent the links set up between Bologna and Zagreb can be seen as an early form of détente as various actors responded to the logic of a bipolar world. It also asks whether the hope of ‘détente from below’ was in fact utopian in the context of international economic inequalities, and therefore a harbinger of what we now know as globalisation. Finally, Dr Unkovski-Korica discusses the challenges of researching this topic on the Yugoslav side in relation to the state of archival sources.

Spring 2016 CAS SEE FELLOWSHIP RECIPIENTS

The Center for Advanced Studies, Southeast Europe (CAS SEE) at the University of Rijeka is pleased to announce the recipients of the Spring 2016 CAS SEE Fellowship Awards. The purpose of the CAS SEE Fellowship Programme is to further the research or creative work in the humanities and humanistic social sciences in the Balkans. Fellows will present their work within the CAS-Collegium on a bi-weekly basis, creating an intellectually heterogeneous atmosphere and fostering a productive self-examination and even friction, which may lead to new and unexpected ideas and innovation. Please join us in congratulating the following Spring 2016 CAS SEE Fellowship Awards, University of Rijeka recipients:

Mate Nikola Tokić

Project – title: For the Homeland Ready! Émigré Croat Separatism and Transnational Political Violence in the Cold War

Dane Taleski

Project – title: Post-conflict democratization, transformation of armed groups

Nuri Ali Tahir

Project – title: Controlling the Borders of “Borderless” Europe in the Age of Migration

Ali Emre Benli

Project – title: Towards a more just Common European Asylum System: A social choice approach

Vladimir Unkovski-Korica

Project – title: City Partnerships in the Cold War: Twinning Zagreb and Bologna, 1963-1991

Alfredo Sasso

Project – title: From the crisis to a “Third Yugoslavia”. The political project of Ante Marković and the Alliance of Reformist Forces (1989-1991)

Aleksandra Djurasovic (non-resident fellow)

Project – title: Shifting Urbanity: Rethinking the Inequalities in the Cities

Giulia Carabelli (non-resident fellow)

Project – title: The Ties That (Un)Bind: Affect And Organisation In The Bosnia-Herzegovina Protests, 2014

Francesco Marone (non-resident fellow)

Project – title: The Structure And Dynamics Of Migrant Smuggling From Libya To Italy