Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe

“Peace and Conflicts – Present and Future Challenges” Conference

The conference Peace and Conflicts – Present and Future Challenges (April 16 – 17, 2018)  is set to be held at the University in Rijeka (Campus) within the organizational framework of the University of Rijeka, Peace Research Institute, Oslo; International Center for Ethics in the Sciences and Humanities, University of Tübingen; Center for Peace Studies, Zagreb; and CeKaDe, Rijeka; along with conference partners Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung, Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe, City of Rijeka, Primorje-Gorski Kotar County and Rijeka 2020.


The conference will focus on the state of “frozen conflicts”, along with contributions on the nature of political violence, political reconciliation, disagreement resolution etc. Likewise, the conference will explore yet another cause of internal conflicts within our societies – i.e. migrations and the “Balkan Route”. Contributors to this conference include a wide range of eminent experts and activists from Croatia and abroad.


 For full program information please click to enlarge:

 

Conference Venue: Akvarij – University of Rijeka Campus

Address: Radmile Matejčić 5, HR-51000 Rijeka

 


5 YEARS OF CAS SEE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF RIJEKA

The 5th anniversary of the Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe at the University of Rijeka was held at the at the Rectorate’s Aula Magna on Monday, March 26, 2018.

On the occasion, Madam Rector, Prof. Snježana Prijić – Samaržja, Director od CAS SEE opened the event with presentation of the Center’s establishment course, its development vision and the present ventures. On behalf of Dr. Sanja Bojanić, Executive Director of CAS SEE, Kristina Smoljanovic, Project Associate gave a presentation on the Center’s functioning models, its accomplishments in numbers and also of its core strength – the Fellows of CAS SEE. Following this, the present 7th generation of Fellows introduced their academic backgrounds and ongoing research projects to be completed during their Spring/Summer residence at the University of Rijeka.

The event concluded with further discussions around a joint banquet with the modification of the afternoon program, Fellows and Associate Researchers Presentations at the newly established DeltaLab postponed to another date due to unforeseen weather circumstances which held the Trieste ESOF2020 delegation.

 

 

5 Years of CAS SEE at the University of Rijeka

Date: March 19, 2018

Venue: Aula Magna, University of Rijeka Rectorate

Address: Trg braće Mažuranića 10, HR-51000 Rijeka, Croatia

Center for Advanced Studies was established on March 13, 2013 at the University of Rijeka. In its five years long course of action, the Center is performing scientific and research activities in the fields of Social Sciences, Humanities, Architecture and Urbanism studies. It aims to assemble scientists from all over the world with an intention of pursuing scientific and applied research on contemporary subjects, particularly those of relevance for the region of Southeastern Europe. It also strives to create a framework of cooperation and exchange of internationally acknowledged research centers in the region and beyond. The goal of the Center is establishing excellence of regional research through supporting researchers and impeding (permanent) departures of academic workers („circulation and brain gain strategy“).

The Center organized and participated in various projects within Croatia and across Europe. Implementation of its activities includes guest lectures, round tables, debates, international conferences, summer schools, research projects and regular stipends for its postdoctoral fellows. In the past five years the Center hosted nearly 50 postdoctoral fellows and it is the only center of its kind both in Croatia and the region.

The Center is the lead project host of the Sweet & Salt Flagship within the Rijeka – European Capital of Culture 2020 program. Establishing and incubating the DeltaLab Laboratory for Urban Reinvention at the University of Rijeka is one of key program activities, including the seasonal Fashion Weeks – showcasing themes of the Sweet & Salt Flagship through various public lectures, exhibitions, round tables, performances, concerts, installations, bottom up actions and more, in the Sweet & Salt zone, leading up to 2020.

Through the collaboration with the Rijeka – European Capital of Culture 2020  and the Trieste – European City of Science 2020 projects, the Center is planning activities focusing on shared opportunities, fostering future cooperation and strengthening models between the two cities.

Program

11.30 – 11.45 Welcome Address Prof. Snježana Prijić-Samaržija, Madam Rector, Director of CAS SEE
11.45 – 12.15 5th Anniversary in Numbers: CAS SEE Dr. Sanja Bojanić, Executive Director of CAS SEE
12.15 – 12.30 Cooperation: University of Rijeka – Trieste ESOF 2020 – Rijeka ECOC 2020 Prof. Snježana Prijić-Samaržija, Madam Rector, Director of CAS SEE
12.30 – 13.30 Trieste ESOF 2020 Prof. Stefano Fantoni, President of Trieste International Foundation for the Progress and Freedom of Science
13.30 – 14.30 Lunch

Venue: Rectorate

Rijeka2020 – DeltaLab Venue: ex-IVEX

Address: Delta 5, HR-51000 Rijeka

15.00 – 16.00 Dialogues

 

Moderator:

Bernard Koludrović, Rijeka ECOC2020

Trieste ESOF2020

Rijeka ECOC2020

Prof. Stefano Fantoni, President of Trieste International Foundation for the Progress and Freedom of Science

Ms. Irena Kregar-Šegota, Development and Strategic Partnerships Director

Ms. Mara Anjoli Vujić, Culture Director

16.00 – 16.45 Presentation

 

Rijeka ECOC2020 – UNIRI Prof. Rajka Jurdana-Šepić, University of Rijeka, CCT Executive Board President

Prof. Idis Turato, Sweet & Salt Flagship Director and

Mr. Marko Luka Zubčić, Sweet & Salt Program Coordinator

Break
17.00 – 18.30 CAS SEE @DeltaLab Fellows and Associate Researchers Presentations

Moderator: Dr. Sanja Bojanić

Dr. Filip Milačić: „The Emergence of Identity Politics Cleavage and its Effect on Social Movements“

Dr. Nebojša Zelič: “Resource Curse and Duties Towards Immigrants”

Dr. Ivan Cerovac: „Elitism, Political Legitimacy and Plural Voting“


Davide Pala

Experts, Good Citizens, Democratic Public Debates and Global Warming

“Among climate experts there is an overwhelming consensus that (i) global warming is occurring, that (ii) this fact is alarming and that (iii) humans are causally responsible for it. Despite this, 16% of American citizens deny that (i) global warming is occurring, 48% of them question (ii) its seriousness, and 50% think that (iii) human activity has no role in causing it (Anderson 2011). These discrepancies can be observed in many other countries as well.

In this talk I will provide a normative framework to assess the attitude of those citizens that, like American citizens, in democratic public debates concerning the elaboration of public policies, mistrust experts,  i.e.  trustworthy  epistemic  authorities,  in  regard  to  beliefs  that  are  justified and  almost undisputed within the scientific community. I will argue that this attitude is bad, because citizens that show it do not possess the virtue of the epistemic trust in trustworthy epistemic authorities (ETITEA), which is demanded by the non-exhaustive ideal of the good citizens publicly debating in democratic contexts. According  to  this  non-exhaustive  ideal,  as  a  necessary  but  not  sufficient condition,  in democratic public debates citizens trust trustworthy epistemic authorities as a way to respect themselves and each other as peers in circumstances of epistemic dependence. In more detail, I will show that the virtue of ETITEA is required by three ideas specifying the non-exhaustive ideal of the good citizens publicly debating in democratic contexts, i.e. (i) the idea of rational citizens, (ii) the idea of reasonable citizens, and (iii) the idea of responsible citizens.

First, ETITEA is demanded by the idea of rational citizens (i). Rational citizens normally want to believe justified beliefs. Moreover, they want to act successfully, and know that justified beliefs lead to successful actions more than unjustified beliefs. Yet rational citizens know that in most domains, i.e. all domains in which they are not experts, they do not have first-hand evidence justifying the related beliefs, and cannot even acquire the expertise necessary to understand either the evidence or the claims relative to the evidence. In the light of this, rational citizens dismiss the idea of epistemic independence as irrational, acknowledge their epistemic dependence, and show trust in trustworthy epistemic authorities and their claims. In this way they can rationally hold beliefs in domains in which they are not experts, successfully act on their basis, and show respect to themselves.

Second, ETITEA is required by the idea of reasonable citizens (ii). On the one hand, reasonable citizens respect a reciprocity constraint, therefore they restrain themselves from publicly advancing unjustified and highly sectarian beliefs, because they do not meet almost uncontroversial scientific standards and would not be endorsed by everyone. On the other, reasonable citizens accept, among the burdens of judgement, the fact of epistemic dependence on epistemic authorities as a condition that all citizens (more or less) equally share. Both features lead reasonable citizens to acknowledge the need of ETITEA as a way to respect each other as peers in circumstances of epistemic dependence.

Third, ETITEA is demanded by the idea of responsible citizens (iii). Responsible citizens do not want to unduly harm others and know that public policies based on unjustified beliefs likely harm others. Also, they are aware that they cannot autonomously shape justified beliefs in those domains in which they have no direct expertise. Responsible citizens, therefore, in public debates concerning the elaboration of public policies show trust in trustworthy epistemic authorities in those domains in which they are laypersons. This is a way to respect both co-citizens and citizens of other countries.

Having elaborated this normative framework, I will employ it to assess the public mistrusting attitude  showed,  within  democratic  contexts,  by  citizens  toward  those  trustworthy  epistemic authorities addressing global warming, and argue that it is bad because it shows a lack of rationality, reasonableness, and responsibility. Finally, I will outline some public and feasible strategies that should be used to modify this bad attitude.”


Davide Pala is a Post-doc Fellow at the CAS-SEE of Rijeka. Previously he was a Post-doc Fellow at the “Fondazione Burzio” of Turin and a PhD Student at the University of Turin, in the Department of Cultures, Politics and Society. He was Visiting Post-doc Fellow at the University of Frankfurt (Justitia Amplificata) and at the University of Manchester (Mancept). He works in the field of normative political theory applied to international issues. In particular, his research focuses on global justice, world poverty and economic inequalities. On the matter he wrote several articles focused on institutional cosmopolitanism, capability approach, legal positivism and nationalism. He is currently developing a normative republican account of world poverty.

CARLO BURELLI

The Pure Normativity of Realism

“In this paper, I investigate the question of whether realism can provide a substantive normative standard to evaluate institutions. While classical realists focus on the individual dimension of political actors and their freedoms and responsibilities, many contemporary realists adopt broadly liberal values for political institutions. Drawing from discussions about the realistic conception of politics, I defend a functional understanding of politics as selection and implementation of collective decisions within a social group. A functional normative standard can then be derived: political institutions are ‘good’ when they adequately perform this function, independently of their moral qualities, in the same way a ‘good soldier’ is someone who is good at fighting (its function), independently of whether he is a good man. This normative standard is independent from morality and internal to politics. If being a good man requires abstaining from violence, one cannot be a good man (in the moral sense) and a good soldier (in the functional sense), similarly to how Machiavelli claimed that a good Christian cannot be a good politician. Realists not only claim this independence of politics, but often also its priority. The political function is vital, because it is required to preserve the survival of the social group and its individuals. This is the ‘pure’ normative dimension of political realism, which takes priority – but not exclusivity – over other moral considerations, and is thus ‘the first virtue of political institutions’ because those which do not express it cannot sustain themselves through time.”


Carlo Burelli is a current CAS Fellow at the University of Rijeka, where he works on a realistic theory of order, as the first virtue of political institutions. Previously, he had a two year Post-Doc Fellowship in the ERC Project REScEU where he investigated political conflicts and realistic forms of solidarity. He received his PhD in 2015 from Università Statale di Milano defending the thesis: “The Normative Power of Necessity: Making Sense of Political Realism”. In 2014, he was a visiting PhD at the University of Cambridge under Raymond Geuss. He has written articles on Political Realism (Towards a Realistic Conception of Politics, 2017), Solidarity (Realistic Solidarity for the Real EU, 2016) and the philosophy of Thomas Hobbes (Lex Facit Veritatem, 2015; Subjectivity is Objective, 2017). He is also the author of a short monograph on game theoretic interpretations of Hobbes’s “state of nature” (E fu lo Stato, 2010).

Natasha Jankovic

Architectural terRI(s)tories[1]:
mapping the process of city transformation

[1] Architectural stories about Rijeka’s territory

“Architecture represents one of the possible ways of how territory can be marked, but it is also a permanent trace of the process of its development. As a built form it is a sign in the ground, while as an idea it represents a trace of various approaches to its development within theoretical field. This research examines the significance and meaning of a single architectural gesture within the context of architectural narrative of the city territory by starting from the structural approach to observation of the territory and the method of post-structuralist analysis.
This research links and analyses: 1) the importance of the architectural gesture in the process of defining and developing the territory of the city, through 2) changing position from the phenomenological (formal, formative) to critical discourse of observing architecture, which examines 3) the potential of the interpretative narrative both of the architecture and the territory. With approach based on semantics and metaphors, the aim of the research of the territory and architecture as an element of its structure, is to ‘read’ some of the layers of the city (terRI[s]tories), which is considered as a cultural palimpsest, through processes and material layers of its changes and development.
This theoretical background and methodological apparatus was used in order do re-write 20.20 stoRIes of Rijeka (20 terRI(s)tories – Architectural stories about Rijeka’s territory from 20th century). More precise 20 terRI(s)tories as spatial sequencesfrom the period between 1920th (the year of Rijeka’s autonomy) and 2020th (the year when Rijeka will be European Capital of Culture) thematically grouped into different chapters were mapped with the aim of presenting some of the scapes – scenery views:  socialscapepowerscapevisionscapealterscapememoryscape and spaces of porosity (within differentscapes) of the Rijeka’s territory transformation. Reading of the terRI(s)tories should examine the potential of spatial narrativity within specific spatio-temporal context for a re-wRIting of a new stoRIes with(out) words or (new) objects by using of existingspatial sequences for future conceptions and actions.”

Natasha Jankovic is an architect, working in the filed of research, practice and education, currently in the position of research and teaching associate of the University of Belgrade – Faculty of Architecture,  where she obtained her PhD. So far, her particular research interests is given to the topic of the relationship between architecture and territory, architecture and nature, as well as city territory transformation. Publishes professional and scientific papers in national and international journals, books and conference proceedings. Participates in national and international exhibitions and architectural and urban competitions. Living in urban environments, she seeks to read some of the terri(s)tories (architectural inscriptions within the territory, written through architecture as a code of city structure) that serves as a document about the past processes of development; but she also wishes to mark the territory: by making an architectural gesture in a natural environment, in order to write some new terri(S)tory.

Call for Papers: 2018 CAS SEE Summer School

Critique of Violence Now: From Thinking to Acting against Violence
Rijeka, June 18 – 22, 2018

Guest lecturers:

Judith Butler (Berkeley University)

Hervé Le Brass (Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, Paris)

Peter Fenves (Northwestern University)

Alexis Nuselovici-Nouss (University of Aix-Marseille, Fondation Maison des sciences de l’homme)

Astrid Deuber-Mankowsky (Ruhr University Bochum)

Marc Crepon (Ecole normale supérieure, Paris)

 

Rationale and background:

The 2018 CAS SEE Summer School examines one of today’s most pressing topics: how to think and what to do with violence in our present society. To what extent is it possible to deconstruct and name emerging mechanisms of violence? What are the kinds of phenomena that escalate coercion and violence, making it difficult to either contain them or to work out feasible alternatives? Assuming that violence in the various social contexts is not a self-contained, but rather a relational/social phenomenon (across various social entities and institutions such as families, associations, corporations, nations, states, religions), is there any social purpose of violence, and is there any productive alternative to violence? Is violence a form of communication, and are there substitutes in terms of strategies of communication that might non-repressively reduce the recourse to violence?

Southeastern Europe has seen more than its share of violence, as well as of anti-violence ideology over the past several decades, propagated both by the states and governments and by civil society organizations and various sections of the society. The region has seen the adoption and implementation of various EU laws and policies to a far greater and more extreme level than they were implemented in their countries of origin. The trend is partly a symptom of identity crisis and identity insecurity, where policies are designed to curtail all kinds of violence in society, shifting power towards every increasing prerogatives of the administration. Every instance of violence tends to be interpreted as a systematic social degeneration, which needs to be uprooted by draconian control and repressive policies. The results include an extremely powerful police force and state institutions with sweeping authority over individual citizens, and an increasing apathy and defensiveness by the ordinary people. Thus the study of violence as well as anti-violence policy addresses a core issue for the quality of life in Southeastern Europe.

“Critique of Violence Now” will:

  • Provide a framework for exchange of views and insights among activists and academics on following topics: Political Violence, Administrative Violence, Legal Violence, Domestic Violence, Collective Violence in the regional and global context, Countering (discourses of) violence through social engagement, Social inequalities and neoliberal conquest of state and society;
  • Inspire and build capacity of participants through stimulating topical and theoretical input by renowned academics, creating opportunities for building networks and joint cooperation actions in the field;
  • Provide workspaces for the participants to discuss and work on short papers (app. 3 pages) dedicated to four major clusters: “Political Violence: Revisited”; “Administrative Violence: Migration”; “Ethnicized and Racialised Violence”; “Deconstructing Misogyny and Patriarchy”. Papers (in English) would be further refined immediately after the Summer School and published in a volume edited by the Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory University of Belgrade.

Technical information and application procedure:

The official language of the Summer School is English.

The Program Committee of the 2018 CAS SEE Summer School will select the presenters based on the submitted abstracts responding to four Clusters:

  • “Political Violence: Revisited”;
  • “Administrative Violence: Migration”;
  • “Ethnicized and Racialized Violence”;
  • “Deconstructing Misogyny and Patriarchy”

We kindly ask you to put the following title in your email subject: ‘Name: title of the paper’. The complete application should be submitted in.doc or .docx format, and must contain: the title of the presentation, an abstract of up to 200 words, key words and a short biography in English.

Summer School applications should be sent only via e-mail to the following address: cas@cas.uniri.hr

Deadline for abstracts is 31st March 2018.

It is expected that the participants submit their full papers before 1st June 2018.

2018 CAS SEE Summer School Full Registration Fee is 125 Euros; Student Registration Fee is 50 Euros.

Payment is due before 1st June 2018.

The Summer School hosts offer reception and the ticket entrance for the theatre performance on June 18th in the evening, and provide refreshments throughout the duration of the Summer School program.

Important dates:

Application deadline: 31st March 2018

Notification of acceptance: 30th April 2018

2018 CAS SEE Summer School dates: 18th–22nd June 2018

Program Committee:

Astrid Deuber-Mankowsky; Ruhr University Bochum

Petar Bojanic; IFDT University of Belgrade / CAS SEE University of Rijeka

Vedran Dzihic; oiip / CAS SEE University of Rijeka

Manuela Bojadzijev; Humboldt University

Sanja Bojanic; CAS SEE/CWS, University of Rijeka

Adriana Zaharijevic; IFDT, University of Belgrade

Gazela Pudar Drasko; IFDT, University of Belgrade

Organization Board:

Mónica Cano Abadía, Kristina Smoljanovic, Marko-Luka Zubcic (CAS SEE University of Rijeka)

For information on the time schedule, organization and future events, please follow us at the official website and the Facebook page.

If any further details are needed, please contact us at: cas@cas.uniri.hr

2018-2019 CAS SEE FELLOWSHIP RECIPIENTS

The Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe (CAS SEE) at the University of Rijeka is pleased to announce the recipients of the 2018/2019 CAS SEE Fellowship Awards.

The purpose of the CAS SEE Fellowship Programme is to further the research or creative work in the humanities and humanistic social sciences in the Balkans. Fellows will present their work within the CAS-Collegium on a bi-weekly basis, creating an intellectually heterogeneous atmosphere and fostering a productive self-examination and even friction, which may lead to new and unexpected ideas and innovation.

Please join us in congratulating the following 2018-2019 Spring CAS-SEE Fellowship Awards, University of Rijeka recipients:

Filip Milacic (Humboldt University of Berlin, Germany) – The emergence of identity politics cleavage and its effect on social movements

Tiziano Toracca (University of Perugia, Italy; University of Ghent, Belgium) – Metamorphosis of Labour. The Movement for a Basic Income in the Light of the Modern Paradigm of Labour

Francesca  Forlè  (Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Italy) – Rythmòs in Acting Together. Reinforcing Joint Actions, Improving Stability, and Orienting Power Hierarchies

Daniela Brasil (Bauhaus-Universität Weimar, Germany) – Emancipatory Learning: New Schools and Artistic Platforms for Social Change

Polona Sitar (University of Ljubljana, Slovenia) – Global Menstrual Movements as New Forms of Social Engagement

Barbara Turk Niskac (University of Ljubljana, Slovenia) – “Life is all about work”: Growing Food as Lifestyle Politics

Pavao Zitko (University of Perugia, Italy) – Ultramodern Man as a State of Consciousness

The 7th generation of fellows will start their collaboration with a working meeting scheduled for 23 February, 2018 at the University or Rijeka.

The 2018-2019 Spring CAS SEE Fellowship Awards winners will be announced on March 19, 2018 at a public event following the 5th anniversary of the Center for Advanced Studies founding at the University of Rijeka.

FASHION WEEK WINTER 2017

Fashion Week is a seasonal showcase of the Sweet and Salt flagship, which is a part of a project Rijeka – European Capital of Culture 2020, presenting us with themes, concepts, works, plans and cooperative developments connected to the understanding and designing the future city through the context of Rijeka and the S&S territory. This year’s event took place 19th – 21st December at the DeltaLab, presently situated in the exIvex building, and its themes were the reinvention of Delta Hood and the introduction of the newly formed DeltaLab.

FW2017 kicked off with a Reinventions Live workshop which gathered architecture students, exIvex residents and Rijeka “creatives” for the task of reinventing the exIvex building by coupling the various unexpected potential users with a variety of non-physical contexts. In the second part of the day, Urbanist Platform provided the trip to Lipa Remembers museum and conversation with the exhibition authors and the curator, as well as the trip to the Museum of Contemporary and Modern Art and the conversations with the director and the author of the reconstruction.

The second day started with the opening of the exhibition and the presentations of Reinventions – Delta Hood, beginning with the thought-provoking results of the previous day’s workshop, which sparked off debates concerning the future developments of tourist, military, agricultural and administrative realities. The debates continued with the presentations of the outstanding student works, including the reinventions of exIvex, reinventions of ExportDrvo and the reinvention of Delta Beach. These were followed by the presentation of the “reinvention” of the two-week European architecture students assembly taking place in Rijeka in the summer of 2018 – Re:EASA.

After lunch, DeltaLab was introduced as the new center for urban reinvention, a  platform for research, education and policy development, and Vedran Mimica gave a lecture on Berlage Affairs, reminding us of what a vibrant alternative institution such a center could become. The day ended with the Understading the City roundtable, with Vedran Mimica, Snježana Prijić-Samaržija, Idis Turato, Mia Roth-Čerina, Dinko Peračić and Leo Modrčin discussing the possibilites, challenges, risks and reinventions of education on the contemporary and future urban issues, moderated by Luka Skansi and Nebojša Zelič.

The third day of FW2017 was reserved for discussing the themes and results of the Mare Monti project, an inquiry into the contrasts of Primorje-Gorski Kotar County.

FW2017 ended buzzing with discussion about the futures, of DeltaLab, of the city of Rijeka, of the numerous concepts we once held as familiar which we now recognize to be in the state of strange transformation, of cities, of the planet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lecture and Seminar with Tamar Meisels and Margaret Moore in Belgrade

Targeted Killing with Drones? Old Arguments, New Technologies
Public Lecture by Tamar Meisels (Tel Aviv University)

Tamar Meisels is a professor of Political Theory in the department of Political Science at Tel Aviv University. She earned her D.Phil. in Politics from Oxford University in 2001. Her primary research and teaching interests include liberal nationalism, territorial rights, and the philosophical questions surrounding war and terrorism. She is the author ofTerritorial Rights (2005, 2009); The Trouble with Terror (Cambridge University Press, 2008), Contemporary Just War: Theory and Practice (Routledge, 2017), and co-editor (with Michael L. Gross) ofSoft war – the Ethics of Unarmed Conflict(Cambridge University Press, 2017).

Date and Time: Friday, October 20, 2017  | 17.00 – 20.00 pm

Venue: University of Belgrade, Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory – Kraljice Natalije 45, 11 000 Belgrade

Introduction: Srđan Prodanović (IFDT)

Moderation: Aleksanadar Fatić (IFDT)

“The question of how to contend with terrorism in keeping with our pre-existing moral and legal commitments now challenges Europe as well as Israel and the United States: how do we apply Just War Theory and International Law to asymmetrical warfare, specifically to our counter terrorism measures? What can the classic moral argument in Just and Unjust Wars teach us about contemporary targeted killings with drones?

I begin with a defense of targeted killing, arguing for the advantages of pin pointed attacks over any alternative measure available for combatting terrorism. Assuming the legitimacy of killing combatants in wartime, I argue, there is nothing wrong, and in fact much that is right, with targeting particular terrorists selected by name, as long as their assassinations can be reasonably expected to reduce terrorist hostilities rather than increase it. Subsequently, I offer some further thoughts and comments on the use of remotely piloted aircrafts to carry out targeted killings, and address the various sources for discomfort with this practice identified by Michael Walzer and others.”

– Tamar Meisels


A Political Theory of Territory
Seminar with Margaret Moore (Queen’s University, Canada)

Margaret Moore is the author of A Political Theory of Territory (OUP 2015) as well as two other books with Oxford University Press, three edited volumes, and more than 50 articles and refereed chapters. She received her doctorate in 1990 from the London School of Economics & Political Science and is a Professor in the Political Studies department at Queen’s University, Canada. She will be taking up the Olof Palme Visiting Professorship at the University of Stockholm in 2018, and is working on a book on natural resources and justice.

Date and Time: Saturday, October 21, 2017  | 15.00 – 20.00 pm

Venue: University of Belgrade, Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory – Kraljice Natalije 45, 11 000 Belgrade

Instroduction: Aleksanadar Fatić (IFDT)

Moderation: Jovan Babić (Faculty for Humanities and Social Sciences, Belgrade)

Speakers: Margaret Moore (Queen’s University), Tamar Meisels (Tel Aviv University), Adriana Zaharijević (IFDT), Marjan Ivković (IFDT), Miloš Ćipranić (IFDT), Igor Cvejić (IFDT), Bojana Simeunović (Filozofski fakultet, Beograd), Olga Nikolić (IFDT), Michal Sladeček (IFDT), Rastko Jovanov (IFDT), Jovica Pavlović (FPN), Jovan Babić (Filozofski fakultet, Beograd), Miloš Marković (Pravni fakultet, Beograd), Aleksandar Fatić (IFDT), Petar Bojanić (IFDT), Srđan Prodanović (IFDT), Mark Losoncz (IFDT).

This talk will defend a certain theory about the appropriate relationship between people, land and the state.  It will explain why her theory of territory is better than its main rivals and the implications of the theory for resource, boundary-drawing, migration, and defensive rights (war). It will elaborate on some of the central claims of her 2015 book.