CAS SEE

Civil Society Forum Trieste of the Western Balkans Summit Series

Screening of the documentary “Trieste, Yugoslavia”

Date: Monday, July 10, 2017

Venue: Revoltella Museum Gallery of Modern Art, Via Armando Diaz 27, Trieste


18.00 – 18.30 | Welcome speech

Franz Karl Prueller, ERSTE Foundation

Branka Panic, European Fund for the Balkans

18.30 – 20.30 | Screening of the documentary movie: “Trieste, Yugoslavia”

Discussion: „Back to the future – Livable life between nostalgia and utopia“; organized in cooperation with Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe (CAS SEE), University of Rijeka

Special guest: Rade Serbedzija, CAS SEE Honorary Fellow, Professor Emeritus at the University of Rijeka

Speakers:

Snjezana Prijic-Samarzija, Chancellor, University of Rijeka

Gruia Bădescu, CAS SEE Fellow, University of Rijeka

Marek Szilvasi, CAS SEE Fellow, University of Rijeka

Mateja Kurir, CAS SEE Fellow, University of Rijeka

Gregor Moder, CAS SEE Fellow, University of Rijeka

Marija Ott Franolic, CAS SEE Fellow, University of Rijeka

Natasha Sardzoska, CAS SEE Fellow, University of Rijeka

Moderator:

Vedran Dzihic, Austrian Institute for International Affairs, Vienna; CAS SEE, University of Rijeka


20.30 – 21.30 | Dinner Reception at the Revoltella Museum Gallery of Modern Art

LIBERAL DEMOCRACY IN THE WEST / THE END OF HISTORY 25 YEARS LATER

PUBLIC LECTURE

by Professor Francis Fukuyama

Olivier Nomellini Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI) Stanford University

Date: 04 July 2017 / 19.30 – 22.00

Venue: Faculty of Political Sciences, University of Sarajevo

Moderation:

Asim Mujkić, Faculty of Political Sciences, University of Sarajevo

Participants in the discussion:

Petar Bojanić – Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory Belgrade, CAS SEE (UNIRI)

Gruia Badescu; Mateja Kurir-Borovčić; Gregor Moder; Marija Ott-Franolić; Nataša Sardžoski;  Marek Silvazsi –Center for Advanced Studies Fellows, University of Rijeka (CAS SEE, UNIRI)

Marjan Ivković – Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory Belgrade

Gazela Pudar Draško – Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory Belgrade

Damir Kapidžić, Nerzuk Ćurak, Nermina Mujagić, Hamza Karčić – Faculty of Political Sciencies, Sarajevo

Francis Fukuyama has written widely on issues in development and international politics. His book, The End of History and the Last Man, was published by Free Press in 1992 and has appeared in over twenty foreign editions. Fukuyama’s “end of history” thesis was an influential attempt to make sense of the post-cold-war world. In this discussion, Fukuyama will reflect on his ideas and if they survived the tides of criticism and political change.

Francis Fukuyama received his B.A. from Cornell University in classics, and his Ph.D. from Harvard in Political Science. He was a member of the Political Science Department of the RAND Corporation, and of the Policy Planning Staff of the US Department of State. He previously taught at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) of Johns Hopkins University and at George Mason University’s School of Public Policy. He served as a member of the President’s Council on Bioethics from 2001-2004. Dr. Fukuyama is chairman of the editorial board of The American Interest, which he helped to found in 2005. He is a senior fellow at the Johns Hopkins SAIS Foreign Policy Institute, and a non-resident fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and the Center for Global Development. He holds honorary doctorates from Connecticut College, Doane College, Doshisha University (Japan), Kansai University (Japan), Aarhus University (Denmark), and the Pardee Rand Graduate School. He is a member of the Board of Governors of the Pardee RAND Graduate School, the Board of Directors of the National Endowment for Democracy, and a member of the advisory board for the Journal of Democracy. He is also a member of the American Political Science Association, the Council on Foreign Relations, and the Pacific Council for International Affairs.

Organizers: Faculty of Political Sciences, University of Sarajevo; Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade; Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe, University of Rijeka; Center for Ethics, Law and Applied Philosophy, Belgrade

 

2017-2018 CAS SEE FELLOWSHIP RECIPIENTS

The Center for Advanced Studies, Southeast Europe (CAS SEE) at the University of Rijeka is pleased to announce the recipients of the 2017-2018 CAS SEE Fellowship Awards.

The purpose of the CAS SEE Fellowship Programme is to further the research or creative work in the humanities and humanistic social sciences in the Balkans. Fellows will present their work within the CAS-Collegium on a bi-weekly basis, creating an intellectually heterogeneous atmosphere and fostering a productive self-examination and even friction, which may lead to new and unexpected ideas and innovation.

Please join us in congratulating the following 2017-2018 Spring and Autumn CAS-SEE Fellowship Awards, University of Rijeka recipients:

Spring

Mateja Kurir Borovčić (Ljubljana, Slovenia) Architecture as ideology: the perspectives of critical theory from modernism to the present

Gruia Badescu (Oxford University, UK) Spatializing Cultural Policies and Activism in Croatia and Romania: A Comparative, Transnational Study

Marek Szilvasi (Budapest, Hungary) Between Commodity and Common Public Good: Access to Water and its Relevance for Roma People in Europe

Natasha Sardžoska (Skopje, Macedonia) Mapping of spatial memory in limitrophe cities, landscapes, borders and bodies in Istria

Gregor Moder (University of Ljubljana, Slovenia) Critical Theory. Truth in Politics: Comedy, Sophistry and Critique

Marija Ott Franolić (Zagreb, Croatia) Read, Think, Act

Autumn

Milorad Kapetanović (London, UK) Regulation of Informal Construction in Rijeka in the Anticipation of European Capital of Culture Rijeka

Mónica Cano Abadía (Zaragoza, Spain) The Re-Radicalization of Critical Thinking: Toward a Global Social Justice

Chiara Destri (University of Milan, Italy) No Democracy For Devils: Democratic Authority, Citizenship and Parties

Caterina Bonora (University of Bremen; Jacobs University Bremen, Germany) Ne da(vi)mo Beograd and the “new wave” activism in the post-Yugoslav space 

Tom Whyman (University of Essex, UK) Research Proposal: Adorno’s Concept of Natural-History: Crisis and Critical Theory

Davide Pala (University of Torino, Italy) World Poverty, Radical Inequalities and Neo-Republicanism: What Does Non-Domination Normatively Demand and Institutionally Imply in regard to the Poorest?

Carlo Burelli (University of Milan, Italy) A Theory of Order 

ANTON MARKOČ

Are There Genuine Reasons Against Intending Harm?
  “Are bad intentions wrongs per se? In other words, are there normative reasons against intending harm and other bad effects which are not derived from reasons against harming or bringing those effects?
The defenders of the Doctrine of Double Effect and all those who subscribe to the thesis that intentions are non-derivatively relevant to the moral permissibility of actions, must answer these questions affirmatively. For there to be a genuine deontological constraint against intending harm, reasons against intending harm must be reasons per se.
In this talk, I evaluate and find wanting three kinds of theoretical justifications of reasons against intending harm as reasons per se: agent-centered, victim-centered, and impersonal. They state, respectively, that bad intentions are wrongs because they are bad for the agent, or for the victim, or because they are bad, period.
I conclude that although the failure of these justifications is not a decisive evidence to think that there are no genuine reasons against intending harm, it is a good enough evidence to raise serious doubt about it.”
 
Anton Markoč is currently a post-doctoral fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies at the University of Rijeka. He holds a PhD and an MA in Philosophy from Central European University and BSc and specialist degrees in Political Science from University of Montenegro. He specializes in moral and political philosophy, broadly construed, and has competence in similar fields, including the history of moral and political thought, moral psychology, and philosophy of action. His PhD dissertation, “It’s Not the Thought that Counts: An Essay on the Irrelevance of Intentions to the Moral Permissibility of Actions”, was supervised by János Kis and it defended the view that intentions are non-derivatively irrelevant to the moral permissibility of actions. In 2015, he was a Fellow in Philosophy at Harvard University, where he was supervised by T. M. Scanlon. In 2015-2016, he was an adjunct lecturer at University of Donja Gorica in Podgorica, Montenegro, where he taught courses in moral and political philosophy, while in 2014, he worked as a tutor in philosophy at CEU’s Roma Graduate Preparation Program.

DEANA JOVANOVIĆ

The thermodynamics of “muljavine i pizdarije”: state, infrastructure and moral economy of district heating in Bor (Serbia) and Rijeka (Croatia)

“In this seminar I provided an anthropological perspective on how citizens in two post-Yugoslav industrial towns – Bor (Serbia) and Rijeka (Croatia) – encounter and negotiate district heating. I explored how moral economy and neoliberal discourses are embedded in people’s encounter with urban material infrastructure (e.g. pipes and manhole covers) and how the state becomes reinvigorated in such encounters. I used ethnographic material I collected in Bor (2012/2013) and a new material collected in Rijeka in order to discuss post-Yugoslav legacies and possibilities for political action/agency. ”

Deana Jovanović is currently a postdoctoral research fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies of Southeastern Europe at the University of Rijeka. Deana holds a PhD in Social Anthropology (the University of Manchester), and she researches urban, political, and environmental anthropology. Her research focuses on anticipations of futures in deindustrialised and reindustrialised urban environments across East Europe.

Aktionstage: Refugees – Migration – Democracy

The first panel of the Aktionstage: Refugees – Migration – Democracy Symposium held at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna, entitled (Not) Learning from history, part I: Yugoslav refugee crisis – how Europe dealt with it from left to right, moderated by Vedran Džihić (CAS SEE, University of Rijeka, oiip, Vienna) included the presentations of Zoran Slavinić (REMESO, Linköping University), Branka Likić-­Brborić (REMESO, Linköping University) and Melita H. Sunjic (UNHCR, Vienna) that engaged both listeners and speakers in debates on the changing nature of European democracy in the midst of the ongoing refugee crisis.

The second panel, (Not) Learning from history, part II: Integration and democracy from left to right, moderated by Sanja Bojanić (CAS SEE, University of Rijeka) delt with the nature of the contemporary demos. The panel provided experts from various disciplines: Ilker Ataç (University of Vienna), Gudrun Biffl (Danube University Krems), Holly Case (IWM, Brown University) and Li Bennich-­Björkman (Department of Government, Uppsala University) with the opportunity to offer sensible and culturally diverse outlooks on political participation, contribution and agency. Their explorations of the topics of political optimism, institutional control and emotional engagement provided a fascinating basis for further discussions about the proper response to the refugee crisis.

The third panel, Demos – Who belongs to the political community? moderated by Gerd Valchars (Initiative Minderheiten, Vienna) included presentations of Hedvig Morvai (European Fund for the Balkans, Belgrade), Katharine Sarikakis (University of Vienna) and Snježana Prijić-­Samaržija (CAS SEE, University of Rijeka).

Snjezana Prijic-Samarzija

At the conference, the co-director of the Center for Advanced Studies SEE, professor Snježana Prijić-Samaržija presented her answer to the problem of belonging to a political community. Prijić-Samaržija’s presentation approached the issue of migration from an institutional perspective, questioning the legitimacy of someone’s right to impose limits on the freedom of movement. Throughout the speech, she explored the legitimacy of unilateral prohibitive decisions made by particular states and the implications of their unsustainable one-dimensionality, juxtaposing them with the notion of migration as a basic human right. Should we choose to view the right to seek better political and economic conditions as a manifestation of contemporary social mobility, we would need to address the option that nobody can legitimately limit the movement of others. Striving to reach a balanced conclusion, Prijić-Samaržija proposed delegating the issue of migrations to international institutions capable of adjusting the subjective interests of particular states to the interests of migrants. Relating to the broader topic of the conference, she emphasized the necessary hierarchy of urgency between the migration of genuine refugees, low-skilled workers escaping poverty and high-skilled experts seeking better payment. Her presentation incited many responses from the audience, leading to a discussion about the nature of credible international institutions and the danger of excessive euro centrism.

On Mothers and Daughters with Mira Furlan

The upcoming January premiere of the Autumn Sonata by Ingmar Bergman at the Croatian National Theatre Ivan pl. Zajc in Rijeka was a great motive for another collaboration of scientific and art institutions in Rijeka. This time, the theme of engagement was a contemplation on the specifics and challenges of a complex mother – daughter relationships.

Bergman’s piece opens multiple challenges emerging from the concept of this relationship. The most obvious one might be that of a conflict as a common theme in general displays of women’s relations and with it related misogynist, patriarchal matrix “guarding” the possibilities of affirmative and exclusively women’s connections.

On the other side, “(women’s) family romances” are a counterpoise of an equally limited rhetorical reach. The emerging question therefor might be: what are and what could be the vocabularies of presenting this specific relationship and parenting in general, as a socially important, closely monitored and regulated agency? The talk On Mothers and Daughters led by Mira Furlan, Olga Dimitrijević, Sanja Milutinović Bojanić and Brigita Miloš,  organized by Center for Women’s Studies (Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences), Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe and The Croatian National Theatre Ivan pl. Zajc in Rijeka was held on November 24, 2016 at the University Campus in Rijeka.

SEMINAR WITH FLORIAN BIEBER AND CAS SEE FELLOWS

Following his lecture at the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, professor Florian Bieber, Ph.D. held a seminar on the subject of current political developments in the U.S. and Europe and the complex life of academia, in dialogue with the fourth generation of CAS SEE Fellows at the University of Rijeka.

FLORIAN BIEBER

Crisis of Democracy in Southeastern Europe

A lecture by Folrian Bieber, Ph.D., entitled “Crisis of Democracy in Southeastern Europe”, was held on Thursday, November 10, 2016 at the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences. The lecture was organized by Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe in cooperation with Department of Cultural Studies at the University of Rijeka.

The talk explored if the current crisis of democracy is substantially new or whether it echoes patterns from the 1990s. In doing so, it contextulised the current crisis of democracy in the larger European context and examins the larger challenges to liberal democracy. The 1990s in the Western Balkans was characterized by authoritarian and semi-democratic regimes that combined multi-party elections with nationalist rhetoric and the privatization of the state to affiliated business interests. After regional move towards democratization in the early 2000s, the semi-authoritarian practices began re-appearing by the late 2000s and have by now firmly taking root. The talk will argue that the current semi-authoritarian systems structurally differ from those of the 1990s, yet draw on the inability of the hiatus of democratization to rupture the structural mechanisms that facilitate the return of authoritarian practices.

Florian Bieber, Ph.D., is a professor of Southeast European Studies and director of the Centre for Southeast European Studies at the University of Graz, Austria. He studied at Trinity College (USA), the University of Vienna and Central European University, and received his PhD in Political Science from the University of Vienna. Between 2001 and 2006 he worked in Belgrade (Serbia) and Sarajevo (Bosnia & Hercegovina) for the European Centre for Minority Issues. He is a Visiting Professor at the Nationalism Studies Program at Central European University and has taught at the University of Kent, Cornell University, the University of Bologna and the University of Sarajevo.

ANDREW HODGES

Social Inequalities on the Urban Periphery? Vocational Education, Ultras’ Participation and Cultures of Resistance in the Classroom

This project seeks to analyse processes of class production as manifest through educational ‘sorting’ mechanisms alongside passive/active forms of resistance present amongst pupils enrolled in vocational education (strukovne škole) on the urban periphery of Zagreb. The aim is to make a unique contribution to anthropological studies of educational ‘failure’ (Willis 1977; Evans 2008) alongside football youth subcultures, drawing on my previous work on all of these topics (Hodges and Stubbs 2016; Hodges 2016; 2015; 2014). Through semi-structured interviews and ethnographic observation, I will examine the relationship between the organised practices of a fan group (the Bad Blue Boys, hereon BBB) supporting the Zagreb based team GNK Dinamo and oppositional cultures of resistance in the classroom. These practices will be examined in the context of pupils’ life trajectories relating to the transition between school and work/unemployment, with a specific focus on class production. The urban peripheral context, where hierarchies associated with urban belonging are contested, adds a further class-related component to the study, as well as a distinctly post-Yugoslav flavor which will be contrasted and compared with the UK focused literature on class, educational failure, and fan practices.