CAS SEE

The Call for 2nd Summer School in Migration: European Border Regime in the Periphery of the EU

The Second Summer School in Migration explores the analytical potential of critical migration and border regime studies in the context of the EU periphery or more precisely in the context of research of/along the so-called Balkan route. The school will consider current research and the struggles surrounding migration in the Balkan region. It will also explore the wide range of attempts made by the EU, transnational institutions, countries, local and interregional structures, and multiple humanitarian actors to regain control over the migrants’ movements after the official closure of the humanitarian-securitarian corridor in 2016. It will reflect on the highly dynamic and conflictual developments since the long summer of migration and its historical entanglements, the ambiguities of humanitarian interventions and strategies of containment, migrational tactics to survive, local struggles, artistic interventions, regional and transnational activism, and recent initiatives to curb the extensive practices of border violence and pushbacks.

The Summer School is a joint project organized by the Institute of Ethnology and Folklore Research (Croatia), the University of Göttingen, Department of Cultural Anthropology/European Ethnology (Germany), the Institute of Ethnography of the Serbian Academy of Sciences (Serbia), the Research Centre of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts (Slovenia), the University of Rijeka, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Department of Cultural Studies and Center for Advanced Studies – Southeastern Europe (Croatia).

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Seminar with Dragana Kovačević Bielicki

Mapping the anti-migrant protests in Serbia, Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina through their online media coverage (2015-present)

“The ‘migrant crisis’ in Europe in 2015 and beyond has resulted in an abundance of pro- and anti-migration discourses and practices. The continuous arrival and transit of migrants has been accompanied by rising anti-migration sentiments and reactions. This presentation will focus on the organized anti-migrant protests in three transit countries along the Western Balkan migration route: Serbia, Croatia, and Bosnia and Herzegovina (hereafter BH), in the period between 2015 and present. The aim is to first map and consequently explain the anti-migrant protests that have been organized across the territory of these three countries starting from the so-called migrant crisis and into the present, through the lens of their online coverage. Protests are one of the most visible practices used to express rejection of any social phenomenon, also a practice that tends to attract media attention. Online news media are among the most prominent environments relevant to the reproduction of cultures of rejection and cultures of acceptance alike. This is why, in addition to mapping the protests so far organized, this research will seek to explain how these protests are framed in the online news media, and what experiences and discourses fuel the negative reactions to migrants and migration. Serbia and Croatia are two of the Western Balkan countries that have been prominently featured as transit countries along the Balkan route during the ‘crisis’ in 2015 and 2016. In addition, it is important to include BH in the proposed case study, a currently highly relevant transit country. In the first years of the ‘crisis’ BH was not widely seen as one of the desirable stops along the route for most migrants. However, in 2018, due to the constant redirection of migrants arriving to the Balkans, BH experienced the unprecedented scale of migrant movement through its territory, people attempting to cross to Croatia and further. This resulted in recent widespread media coverage of the migrants’ movement and treatment in this country as well. This presentation will theoretically be framed through the notion of interdiscursivity, seen as the key to understanding how discursive change is related to social change. The interdiscursive context of a text refers to recontextualization of other texts and discourses (Fairclough 1992; Wodak & Fairclough 2010). Digital ethnography is the method I will employ to collect material, while the analyzes of the material will be informed by Multimodal Critical Discourse Analyses or MCDA, most specifically as outlined by Kress and Leuven (2001).”

Dragana Kovačević Bielicki is a migration researcher with background in social anthropology and philosophy.  She received a PhD in Migration, Nationalism and Culture Studies in 2016 from the University of Oslo. In addition, she holds degrees from Central European University (MA, Nationalism Studies) and the University of Belgrade (BA, Philosophy). A monograph based on her doctoral research was published in 2017 with the title Born in Yugoslavia – Raised in Norway: Former Child Refugees and Belonging (Oslo, Novus Press, 2017). She is a returning lecturer in Peace and Conflict Studies at the International Summer School, University of Oslo.

The seminar in dialogue with the UNIRI CAS SEE Fellows was held via Skype on December 5, 2019 at the University Campus in Rijeka.

Open Doors Day at the Moise Palace

New academic year 2019/2020
Lecture by Bernard Stiegler and a roundtable

October 1st, 2019 at 12.00 pm

It is our pleasure to invite you to the celebration of the beginning of the new academic year 2019/2020, which will be marked on October 1st, 2019 at 12.00 pm with an Open Doors Day at the Moise Palace (City of Cres), and numerous interesting activities.

Firstly, the inauguration of the 10th generation of Fellows of University of Rijeka, Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe and the presentation of their research projects to the citizens of Cres, the academic community and the interested public, will be accompanied in dialogue with the representatives of the University of Rijeka and the City of Cres concerning the vision of the development of the future University Center for Humanities and Social Sciences, which will be hosted in the newly renovated renaissance palace.

Rector of University of Rijeka, Prof. Snježana Prijić-Samaržija, State Secretary Krešimir Partl, the mayor of City of Cres, Kristijan Jurjako, and the Director of Friedrich Ebert Stiftung Zagreb, Türkan Karakurt, will deliver an address to the gathered audience, which will be followed by the lecture by the French philosopher, Prof. Bernard Stiegler, on the subject of the development of the activities of the future Center in a discourse with the community. The lecture will begin at 12:00 pm.

The tour of the Palace with an expert guidance by Danijel Ciković, Ph.D. (Academy of Applied Arts in Rijeka) will take place at 4.30 pm while the roundtable on the development of the future Center for Humanities and Social Sciences begins at 5.00 pm. The roundtable will be moderated by Ass. Prof. Sanja Bojanić, Director of the Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe, and the guests of the roundtable will be: Snježana Prijić-Samaržija, Rector of the University of Rijeka, Kristijan Jurjako, mayor of the City of Cres, Đanino Sučić, vice-president of the council of Primorje-Gorski Kotar County, Aleksandra Deluka-Tibljaš, Lifelong learning program Director, UNIRI, and Dorian Celcer, Partnership and Communications coordinator, Rijeka 2020.

By developing this unique cultural monument through interdisciplinary educational and research activities of a regional scientific center, University of Rijeka and City of Cres together strive to contribute to the progress of understanding and solving the challenges of the contemporary social, academic, cultural and touristic realities.


Bernard Stiegler is a French philosopher, the head of Institut de recherche et d’innovation. He was also the program director at Collège international de philosophie, professor at Université de Compiègne, deputy director of Institut National de l’Audiovisuel, director of IRCAM and director of Department of Cultural Development at Centre Pompidou. He is also the director of Ars Industrialis, an association founded in 2006. He is an author of numerous books and articles focusing on the research into philosophy of technology and the possibility of the political and social response to Anthropocene.

In his Analysis of Guterres’ Speeches, Bernard Stiegler writes that “(f)aced with systemic risks, we need to invent systemic replies”. This is “possible only as a protection, cultivation and participation of knowledge”. The “systemic risks” he refers to are the multiple and complex ecological, economical and political crises spreading through the globe, and accelerating, as a result of a flawed international institutional design which allowed for the conditions conducive to such compound threats and injustices to flourish. How do we change the system? What are the structural, functional and fundamental redesigns necessary for the cosmopolitical community to emerge and for the cooperative heterogeneity to thrive? For one, as we now know, the true progress cannot rely exclusively on technological advancement. While developing and diversifying the emancipatory technological solutions constitutes the necessary aspect of our transition into the post-anthropocene world, the nurture of such knowledge is impossible if it is undertaken without deep inquiries into the social, political, economic and epistemic projects which can give rise to what Dan Ross refers to as “the right kind of crazy for the future”. As Stiegler writes: “A new type on innovation is needed”. This Palace is dedicated to the search for this new type of innovation, this right kind of crazy, these “multiplicities of design” (Geert Lovink) – to the discoveries of the diverse and the intricate systemic elements of our truly liberatory future.

Lecture by Prof. Bernard Stiegler will take place at the Moise Palace on October 1st, 2019, starting at 12.00 pm.


“Cities and regions in flux after border change: Reconfiguring the frontier, reshaping memory and visualizing change in twentieth century Europe”

International Conference

Rijeka, Croatia, 10-12 July 2019

Venue: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences in Rijeka

Address: Sveučilišna avenija 4, 51000 Rijeka (Room 230, 2nd Floor)

Since the end of the First World War, cities and regions in Europe, particularly in the eastern half of the continent, witnessed frequent changes in borders. Previous research on border change and territorial transfers has focused on the actions of nationalizing regimes after the 1919 Paris conference, as well as the post-1945 transfer of territories in East-Central Europe and ensuing flight, expulsions and repopulation programs (Rieber 2000, Ther and Siljak 2001, Ballinger 2003, Crainz Pupo and Salvatici 2008, Snyder 2010, Ferrara 2011, Thum 2011, Reinisch, and White 2011, Ferrara and Pianciola 2012, Service 2013, Sezneva 2013). Recent research has analysed how states appropriated cities and regions they gained from neighbours (Karch 2018), and, in the case of socialist states, used urban remodelling as an opportunity to showcase socialist modernization projects, as occurred in Lviv, Ukraine (Amar 2015) and in Yugoslavia (Kulić and Mrduljaš 2012, Le Normand 2014). While research on transferred cities and territories has tended to see border changes primarily as ruptures tearing people from their old lives and cutting cities off from their previous national frameworks, this emphasis is called into question by scholarship by geographers and sociologists who comprehend cities not as discrete entities but as nodes within regional, national and global networks. From this perspective, cities are spaces in which flows of different types (goods, labour, capital, information) enter, converge, and exit, connecting these cities with other circuits and points across the globe (Massey 1991, Castells 2002, Harvey 2003).

This conference seeks contributions that showcase research on history, memory, and mapping tools in the context of European border changes in the twentieth century. We are interested in highlighting research on the experience of cities and regions that have undergone border changes in the twentieth century in order to showcase histories of transition, to examine the reshaping of local and regional memory practices, and to explore the variety of research methods that might be used to conceptualize and visualize change.

Keynote speakers:

Dominique Kirchner Reill, Associate Professor, University of Miami, author of Nationalists Who Feared the Nation: Adriatic Multi-Nationalism in Habsburg Dalmatia, Trieste, and Venice (Stanford University Press, 2012.) presenting her new book The Fiume Crisis: Life in the Wake of the Habsburg Empire.    

Anne Kelly Knowles, McBride Professor of History at the University of Maine, editor of Placing History: How Maps, Spatial Data, and GIS Are Changing Historical Scholarship (2008) and Geographies of the Holocaust (2014), Guggenheim fellow (2015).

Brendan Karch, Assistant Professor of History at Louisiana State University, author of Nation and Loyalty in a German-Polish Borderland: Upper Silesia, 1848–1960 (Cambridge University Press, 2018)

Olga Sezneva, Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Amsterdam, whose work has examined the connection between the urban built environment and social memory (particularly in the case of Kaliningrad/Königsberg), human mobility, and digital technologies; part of the artistic collective Moving Matters Traveling Workshop.

Organisers: The conference is organized by the Univeristy of Rijeka, Centre for Advanced Studies – South East Europe, with the support of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada-funded project Rijeka in Flux: Borders and Urban Change after World War II, the Memoryscapes project’s Seasons of Power flagship programme for Rijeka 2020 – European Capital of Culture, and the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity Research Group, “Empires of Memory: The Cultural Politics of Historicity in Former Habsburg and Ottoman Cities”.


PROGRAM

 


 

BOOKS, PAPERS AND REVIEWS PUBLISHED BY CAS SEE FELLOWS

CAS SEE fellows have published (or are about to publish) an impressive list of publications in the period between 2018 and 2019:

Daniela Brasil

Brasil, Daniela and Daily Rhythms Collective. NO FEAR, DEAR. Empowerment Print Bar: making voices visible through printing actions in public spaces. 2017-18 in Berlin, Chiang Mai, Graz, Manaus, Salvador da Bahia.

Brasil, Daniela. (2018) Playful Imagination and Artistic Hospitality: Constructing New Narrative for Emancipatory Learning. In: Sertić, Irena/ Parramon, Ramon/Purg, Peter/ Steinbock, Kristina (eds). Participation: Perspectives On Education/ Participatory Art for Invisible Communities, Zagreb: Omnimedia. ISBN 953-95119-1-7

Brasil, Daniela. (2017) The House of Open Gates: an enclave between the city of Graz as it is, and as we imagine it could be. In: Journal of Urban Culture Research. Chulalongkorn University and Osaka City University. ISSN 2408 – 1213 Vol. 14, June 2017.pp.106-115.

Lina Dokuzović

“Militant Research in the Post-Truth Era”; in transversal, 2019.

“They’ll Never Walk Alone: The Life and Afterlife of Gastarbeiters” (eds. B. Buden & L. Dokuzovic) transversal books, 2018.

Lina Dokuzović, “From Guest Workers to Guest Consumers,” transversal, “Remembering Gastarbeiters: Labor and Migration in the Age of Neoliberalism” (English, German, Turkish), 2018.

Francesca Forlè

Forlè, F. (2018), “The ‘How’ and ‘What’ of Aesthetic Experience. Some Reflections Based on Noë’s Strange Tools. Art and Human Nature”, Phenomenology and Mind, 14, pp. 18-28. ISSN: 2280-7853 (print) ISSN: 2239-4028 (online)

Forlè, F. (2018) (with Elisabetta Sacchi), “Art as Complement of Philosophy”, Phenomenology and Mind, 14, pp. 10-15. ISSN: 2280-7853 (print) ISSN: 2239-4028 (online)

Forlè, F. (2017), “Quale movimento in musica? Integrazioni strausiane all’approccio enattivo di Krueger”, Quaderni della Ginestra, 20/1, pp. 23-28. ISSN: 2240-337X

Forlè, F. (2017), “Where Straus meets Enactivism. Reflections on an Enactive Theory of Music Perception”, Rivista di Estetica, 66, pp. 106-117. ISSN: 0035-6212.

Forlè, F. (2017), Qualità terziarie. Saggio sulla fenomenologia sperimentale, FrancoAngeli, Milano (Book).

Nilay Kılınç

Kılınç, N. (2019). From Vagabond To Tourist:: Second-Generation Turkish-German Deportees’ Narratives of Self-Healing and Well-being. Nordic Journal of Migration Research1(ahead-of-print).

Barbara Turk Niskač

Turk Niskač, Barbara (2018). “A Tale of Two Kindergartens: Visual Representations of Slovenian Children’s Daily Lives in a Rural and an Urban Setting.” In Visual Encounters and Rural Childhoods. April Mandrona and Claudia Mitchell, ed. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press. pp. 147 – 160.

Turk Niskač, Barbara (2017). “Otrokocentričnost in (ne) vključevanje otrok v delovna opravila v zgodnjem otroštvu (Protective parenting and the inclusion of children in chores in early childhood).” In Generaciji navidezne svobode: otroci in starši v sodobni družbi (Generations of Freedom: Children and Parents in Contemporary Society). Tamara Narat and Urban Boljka, ed. Ljubljana: Založba Sophia. pp. 179 – 205 (Zbirka Naprej!, ISSN 2385-880X)

Arianna Piacentini

Piacentini A., State Ownership and “State-Sharing”: The Role of Collective Identities and the Sociopolitical Cleavage between Ethnic Macedonians and Ethnic Albanians in the Republic of North Macedonia, Nationalities Papers, forthcoming 2019

Toracca Tiziano

Toracca, T. Towards Exemplarity: When the Particular Matters, in «Exemplarity and Its Normativity», Special Issue ed. by A. Condello e A. Ferrara, in «Law and Literature», vol. 30, 2018, pp 465-477 (published on line 15 November 2017: DOI: 10.1080/1535685X.2017.1379195: to link to this article: https://doi.org/10.1080/1535685X.2017.1379195). ISSN: 1535-685X , 1541-2601

Toracca, T.  «Regno della libertà» o «regno della necessità»? La narrativa italiana contemporanea di fronte all’ambiguità del lavoro. A partire da: Addio. Il romanzo della fine del lavoro di Angelo Ferracuti, in «L’ospite ingrato», ed. by L’ospite ingrato, 2018, pp. 177-193.

Toracca, T.  Debenedetti, il romanzo moderno e il modernismo italiano, in «Allegoria», n. 77, 2018, pp. 68-93.

Toracca, T. Il neomodernismo italiano, in Il modernismo italiano, ed by M. Tortora, Carocci, Roma, 2018, pp. 211-229.

Pavao Žitko

Žitko, P. Karl Jaspers lettore di Cusano. Presupposti interpretativi ed esiti teoretici, Orthotes Editrice, Napoli- Salerno 2018, 130 pp.


 

Lecture by Ulf Brunnbauer

What shipyards can tell about late Socialism and Post-Socialism (and what they cannot), on the example of Uljanik

Anent the recent signing of the Agreement on Academic Cooperation between the University of Rijeka and the University of Regensburg, we are glad to invite you to a lecture by Prof. Dr. Ulf Brunnbauer, Director of the Leibniz Institute for East and Southeast European Studies, University of Regensburg, entitled What shipyards can tell about late Socialism and Post-Socialism (and what they cannot), on the example of Uljanik. The lecture will be held on May 30, 2019 at the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences in Rijeka (Sveučilišna Avenija 4, 51000, Rijeka), starting at 17.00 in Room 405 (4th Floor).

The lecture is organised by Department of Cultural Studies at the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and Center for Advanced Studies Southeast Europe at the University of Rijeka.

Ulf Brunnbauer is director of the Leibniz Institute for East and Southeast European Studies in Regensburg and Professor of Southeast and East European History at the University of Regensburg. He holds a PhD from the University of Graz (1999) and a Habilitation from the Free University of Berlin (2006), and joined the Regensburg faculty in 2008. His research deals mainly with the social history of Southeastern Europe in the 19th and 20th century, focussing on questions of migration, labour, demographic change, family structures, and majority-minority relations. His last research monograph is “Globalizing Southeastern Europe. Emigrants, America and the State Since the Late 19th Century” (2016).


 

Seminar with Ivan Flis


Are Open Science practices the solution? The case of psychology’s replication crisis

“The seminar takes a critical look at the role of Open Science practices and advocacy within the ongoing replication crisis in psychology. Open Science is a multifaceted interdisciplinary movement that spans the modern university, within which scientists themselves criticize established scientific practices of data collection and storage, development and sharing of analysis pipelines, publication and dissemination of research papers, and the so-called “incentive structures” that organize the hiring and advancement of faculty in Global Northern academia. Many of the Open Science interventions are in practice a type of a digital revolution within the academic system, the paradigmatic example being the push for Open Access in scholarly publishing. Reform centered around Open Science practices is proposed as a solution to the ongoing replication crisis in scientific psychology. In this seminar, I will discuss the impact of Open Science reform while taking into account the intellectual and institutional history of psychology as a science, in order to draw some epistemologically relevant conclusions about the ongoing crisis and its proposed solutions.”

Ivan Flis is a research fellow at UNIRI CAS SEE in Rijeka. He recently obtained his PhD in History and Philosophy of Science at Utrecht University in the Netherlands and before that an MA in Psychology at the University of Zagreb. In his PhD thesis, he researched the role of methodological standardization in psychology’s disciplinary formation in the late 20th century, from the perspective of conventional history of science and scientometrics. His main areas of research are history of 20th century psychology, philosophy of social science, and digital humanities.

The seminar was held on May 15, 2019 at the University of Rijeka Campus, Sveučilišni odjeli building (Ul. Radmile Matejčić 2, 51000 Rijeka).


 

Seminar with Bojan Baća


Digitalization of the Marketplace of (Reactionary) Ideas: The Alt-Right as a Political Ideology, Social Movement, and Counter-Culture

 “The seminar explores the emerging phenomenon of the alternative right, or the “Alt-Right”, as a multidimensional phenomenon – that is, as a political ideology, social movement, and counter-culture. By taking a position of critical sociology, this seminar presents preliminary findings on how the digital has molded and steered the political towards the right on social media platforms. This occurs at the level of various reactionary ideas, through networking of diverse right-wing collectives, as well as through the spread of novel cultural practices of “fighting the PC culture and SJWs”. The focus is specifically on how the digitalization of the public sphere – fostered by the rapid rise of new technologies and social networking platforms – has increased and shaped political engagement of the reactionary segments of global civil society.”

Bojan Baća is an Ernst Mach Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center for Southeast European Studies, University of Graz and a Junior Research Fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe at the University of Rijeka. He received his PhD in Sociology from York University, to which he still remains affiliated as an external research associate in the Global Digital Citizenship Lab. In 2015–2016, he was a Swedish Institute Visiting Doctoral Fellow at the University of Gothenburg, specializing in post-socialist civil society and social movement research. Baća continues to explore the relationship between socio-economic/political transformation and civic engagement in post-socialist societies and, more broadly, the role of activist citizenship and contentious politics in democratization processes. His recent work on the topic was published in academic journals such as Antipode and Europe-Asia Studies, as well as in two edited volumes: Changing Youth Values in Southeast Europe: Beyond Ethnicity (Routledge, 2017) and The Democratic Potential of Emerging Social Movements in Southeastern Europe (Friedrich Ebert Stiftung, 2017). As a fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies, Baća is conducting a research project that focuses on English-speaking digital public sphere in the “post-truth era”, in which he explores how digitalization of the “marketplace of ideas” is articulating, mobilizing, and legitimizing political ideas, social actors, and cultural practices that are spreading disinformation and promoting anti-democratic sentiments.

The seminar was held on May 15, 2019 at the University of Rijeka Campus, Sveučilišni odjeli building (Ul. Radmile Matejčić 2, 51000 Rijeka).


Values at Stake: Revisiting Normative Horizons for Southeast Europe

Date: Thursday, 25 April, 2019

Venue: Europe House Zagreb, Jurišićeva 1/1

18:00 -19:30 | Welcome

Türkan Karakurt, Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung Zagreb

Senada Šelo Šabić, Institute for Development and International Relations Zagreb

Public Discussion: Can Values Unite Us? (in B/H/S language) 

Igor Štiks, writer

Antonija Petrušić, Law Faculty, University of Zagreb

Bojan Baća, Center for Advanced Studies Southeast Europe, University of Rijeka & Center for Southeast European Studies, University of Graz

Dorian Celer, Rijeka 2020

Moderation: Vedran Džihić, Institute for Political Sciences, University of Vienna


Friday, 26 April 2019

Venue: Lecture Hall A, Faculty of Political Science, Lepušićeva 2

09:30 -09:45 | Welcome

Türkan Karakurt, Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung Zagreb

Senada Šelo Šabić, Institute for Development and International Relations Zagreb

Introductory words | Zoran Kurelić, Faculty of Political Science Zagreb

Petar Bojanić, Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory Belgrade

Keynote address: What is this thing called Populism?

Philippe Schmitter, European University Institute Florence

Discussion moderated by Senada Šelo Šabić, Institute for Development and International Relations Zagreb

11:15 -11:30 | Coffee Break

11:30 -13:30 | Panel: Reflecting SEE in Europe – normative horizon or marketplace?

Hannes Swoboda, International Institute for Peace

Dejan Jović, Faculty of Political Science, University of Zagreb Abel Polese, Tallin University

Nilay Kilinc, Center for Advanced Studies Southeast Europe, University of Rijeka

Moderation: Gazela Pudar Draško, Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory Belgrade

13:30 -14:30 | Lunch break

Venue: Courtyard Seminar Room

14:30 -16:30 | Panel: Values horizons in SEE – is there an end to particularism?

Aleksandra Kuratko or Jelena Berkovic (tbc), GONG Zagreb

Nedžma Džananović, Faculty of Political Sciences, University of Sarajevo

Jelena Pešić, Faculty of Philosophy, University of Belgrade Ana Chupeska, Law Faculty, University of Skopje

Milivoj Bešlin, Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory Belgrade

Moderation: Sanja Bojanić, Center for Advanced Studies Southeast Europe, University of Rijeka

16:30 -17:30 | Closing remarks


About the workshop

The region of Southeast Europe has been expected to progress almost linearly on the European path, internalizing democratic and liberal values that the EU stands for. The Article 2 of the Treaty of the European Union is the foundation on which the EU ‘normative power’ is based upon: “The Union is founded on the values of respect for human dignity, freedom, democracy, equality, the rule of law and respect for human rights, including the rights of persons belonging to minorities. These values are common to the Member States in a society in which pluralism, non-discrimination, tolerance, justice, solidarity and equality between women and men prevail.”

In Southeast Europe, this normative power was – at least for a while since 2000 – largely uncontested. The assumption was that there is and will be no “turning back” from (the path towards) shared values, democracy, and the rule of law. What almost naturally added to this notion of a “normative empire” EU was the assumption that democracy is the supreme form of a political system, one that is able to “export” its norms to the neighborhood and the Enlargement candidate countries and act as a “normative hegemon”. (see Haukkala in Whitman 2011) With shifting normative horizons globally and in Europe, the EU “normative empire” EU is challenged, be it by illiberal democracies from within, or by competitive (neoliberal) authoritarian regimes (Solska, Bieber, Taleski 2018) from outside including various forms of populist nationalism, tribalism, and xenophobia. In Southeast Europe we see a new “normative market-place” emerging, where the universality of EU norms and values such as democracy, human rights and freedoms and the principle of the rule of law are at stake and openly challenged by alternatives. Anti-EU, anti-liberal visions are on rise. Rather than having the EU as the only “exporter” of liberal values, we observe an import of “anti-liberal” standards from the EU.

The workshop will address the shifting normative horizons in Southeast Europe. It will reconsider the power of the EU as a “normative empire”, look into the historicity of the normative claims and discuss the current “normative market-place” in the region. It will also look into various forms of liberal and emancipatory action and engagement and their normative claims as opposed to right-wing and nationalist movements present in the region. Last but not least, it will engage in thinking about possible utopian horizons able to reclaim democracy, freedom and emancipatory societal values.

The workshop aims at bringing together representatives of academia, civil society and political parties (if possible) to engage in a vivid and, hopefully, controversial debate on normative horizons and clashing values in SEE.


Sanja Bojanic, Nilay Kılınç, Bojan Baca and Abel Polese.