CAS SEE

Lecture and Seminar with Tamar Meisels and Margaret Moore in Belgrade

Targeted Killing with Drones? Old Arguments, New Technologies
Public Lecture by Tamar Meisels (Tel Aviv University)

Tamar Meisels is a professor of Political Theory in the department of Political Science at Tel Aviv University. She earned her D.Phil. in Politics from Oxford University in 2001. Her primary research and teaching interests include liberal nationalism, territorial rights, and the philosophical questions surrounding war and terrorism. She is the author ofTerritorial Rights (2005, 2009); The Trouble with Terror (Cambridge University Press, 2008), Contemporary Just War: Theory and Practice (Routledge, 2017), and co-editor (with Michael L. Gross) ofSoft war – the Ethics of Unarmed Conflict(Cambridge University Press, 2017).

Date and Time: Friday, October 20, 2017  | 17.00 – 20.00 pm

Venue: University of Belgrade, Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory – Kraljice Natalije 45, 11 000 Belgrade

Introduction: Srđan Prodanović (IFDT)

Moderation: Aleksanadar Fatić (IFDT)

“The question of how to contend with terrorism in keeping with our pre-existing moral and legal commitments now challenges Europe as well as Israel and the United States: how do we apply Just War Theory and International Law to asymmetrical warfare, specifically to our counter terrorism measures? What can the classic moral argument in Just and Unjust Wars teach us about contemporary targeted killings with drones?

I begin with a defense of targeted killing, arguing for the advantages of pin pointed attacks over any alternative measure available for combatting terrorism. Assuming the legitimacy of killing combatants in wartime, I argue, there is nothing wrong, and in fact much that is right, with targeting particular terrorists selected by name, as long as their assassinations can be reasonably expected to reduce terrorist hostilities rather than increase it. Subsequently, I offer some further thoughts and comments on the use of remotely piloted aircrafts to carry out targeted killings, and address the various sources for discomfort with this practice identified by Michael Walzer and others.”

– Tamar Meisels


A Political Theory of Territory
Seminar with Margaret Moore (Queen’s University, Canada)

Margaret Moore is the author of A Political Theory of Territory (OUP 2015) as well as two other books with Oxford University Press, three edited volumes, and more than 50 articles and refereed chapters. She received her doctorate in 1990 from the London School of Economics & Political Science and is a Professor in the Political Studies department at Queen’s University, Canada. She will be taking up the Olof Palme Visiting Professorship at the University of Stockholm in 2018, and is working on a book on natural resources and justice.

Date and Time: Saturday, October 21, 2017  | 15.00 – 20.00 pm

Venue: University of Belgrade, Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory – Kraljice Natalije 45, 11 000 Belgrade

Instroduction: Aleksanadar Fatić (IFDT)

Moderation: Jovan Babić (Faculty for Humanities and Social Sciences, Belgrade)

Speakers: Margaret Moore (Queen’s University), Tamar Meisels (Tel Aviv University), Adriana Zaharijević (IFDT), Marjan Ivković (IFDT), Miloš Ćipranić (IFDT), Igor Cvejić (IFDT), Bojana Simeunović (Filozofski fakultet, Beograd), Olga Nikolić (IFDT), Michal Sladeček (IFDT), Rastko Jovanov (IFDT), Jovica Pavlović (FPN), Jovan Babić (Filozofski fakultet, Beograd), Miloš Marković (Pravni fakultet, Beograd), Aleksandar Fatić (IFDT), Petar Bojanić (IFDT), Srđan Prodanović (IFDT), Mark Losoncz (IFDT).

This talk will defend a certain theory about the appropriate relationship between people, land and the state.  It will explain why her theory of territory is better than its main rivals and the implications of the theory for resource, boundary-drawing, migration, and defensive rights (war). It will elaborate on some of the central claims of her 2015 book.

Conference “Cultures in translation: a paradigm for Europe”

Culture in traduzione: un paradigma per l’Europa | Kulture u prijevodu: paradigma za Europu

 Date: 18-19 October 2017, Belgrade

Venue: Italian Culture Institute in Belgrade

Languages: English, Italian and Serbian

Translation: Simultaneous

PROVISIONAL PROGRAMME:
Day 1  |  18 October 2017

9.00-10.00 | Registration of participants and welcome coffee

10.00-10.30 | Opening lecture

⌑ Petar Bojanic, IFDT (10 min)

⌑ Davide Scalmani, IIC (10 min)

⌑ Irena Fiket (10 min)

I         Translatability and Untranslatables: Examples and Reflections

10.30-12.30 | Moderator: Milos Cipranic

Speakers:

10.30-11.00 | Snežana Milinković, University of Belgrade, Professor of Italian literature and translator (Tradurre è impossibile ma necessario) language: Italian

11.00-11.30 | Annette Đurović, University of Belgrade (Od „Personenkennzahl“-a do „Personenkennziffer“-a ili Put između raspada dva sistema u budućnost) language: Serbian

11.30-12.00 | Deja Piletic, University of Montenegro (I dottori del triennio – doktori trogodišnjih studija? Le sfide della traduzione giurata dall’italiano in montenegrino e viceversa) language: Italian

12.00-12.30 | Discussion

12.30-14.00 | Buffet Lunch

II      Philosophy in Translation: Translation as a Philosophical Problem

14.00-17.00 | Moderator: Sasa Hrnjez

Speakers:

14.00-14.30 | Luca Illetterati, University of Padova, Professor of Theoretical Philosophy (Animali che traducono) language: Italian

14.30-15.00 | Adriana Zaharijevic, IFDT, Member of Association of Literary Translators of Serbia (Prevođenje filozofije: slučaj pojma agency) language: Serbian

15-15.30 | Discusssion

15.30-16.00 | Gaetano Chiurazzi, University of Torino, Professor of Theoretical Philosophy (La storicità della traduzione) language: Italian

16.00-16.30 | Zdravko Kobe, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia (Traduzione e trasformazione) language: Italian

16.30-17.00  | Discussion

20.00 | Dinner (Restaurant Savski Venac)

Day 2  |  19 October 2017
III      Translation, Interculturality and European Identity Politics

9.30-13.30 | Moderator: Burelli Carlo

Speakers:

9.30-10.00 | Aleksandra Mančić, Senior Research Associate – Institute for Literature and Arts, Belgrade and translator – Member of Association of Literary Translators of Serbia (Translation as Intercultural Practice and its Relevance for the Future of Europe) language: Serbian

10.00-10.30 | Silvana Borutti, Pavia, Professor of Theoretical Philosophy (L’antropologia e la traduzione come modello della comunicazione interculturale) language: Italian

10.30-11.00 | Discusssion

11.00-11.30 | Djurdja Trajkovic, IFDT (Madness of Pierre Menard: Power of the Untranslatable) language: English

11.30-12.00 | Michael Oustinoff, literary critic and theorist of translation, Professor at the University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, France (Globalization and the Translation of Imaginaries)

12.00-12.30 | Olimpia Giuliana Loddo, The Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe (CAS SEE) Rijeka, University of Cagliari (Translating written norms into normative pictures) language: English

12.30-13.30 | Discussion

13.30-14.30 | Buffet Lunch

IV     Actuality of Translation – Translation as Activity

14.30-17.00 | Moderator: Davide Pala

Speakers:

14.30-15.00 | Gojko Bozovic, Arhipelag, Beograd (Izazovi savremenog prevođenja i savremenog izdavaštva) language: Serbian

15.00-15.30 | Mirna Zelic Pokaz, Head of Croatian Language Department, DGT EC (Translating for the European Commission) language: English

15.30-16.00 | Katja Stergar, Slovenian Book Agency JAK/Traduki / Antje Contius, S. Fischer Stiftung/Traduki (Traduki’s work and implications) language: English

16.00-16.30 | Discussion

16.30-17.00 | Conclusion of the conference

Davide Scalmani, IIC

EUNIC Serbia representative (name still TBC)

20.00 | Dinner (Restaurant in Skadarlija)

Summer school “Between Intellectual and Sensory Reason: Towards an Epistemology of Architecture”

Program
Co-directors:

Snjezana Prijic Samarzija, University of Rijeka

Jörg H. Gleiter, Technical University Berlin

Petar Bojanic, University of Belgrade / CAS SEE University of Rijeka

Vladan Djokic, University of Belgrade

Focal Theme:

Throughout the history of philosophy, architecture has been widely referred to as a metaphor for conscious action and logical construction. For Aristotle the work of the master builder served as a metaphor for his philosophy of action, while Nietzsche used the metaphor of a “shaking tower of concepts” to visualize and make more comprehensible the precarious state of metaphysics. Yet architecture means much more to philosophy and critical thought than what the explanatory use of architectural imagery evokes. It was Kant who went beyond metaphor by claiming “architectonics is the art of systems”. As such, architecture is not only a cultural practice based on knowledge but moreover a cultural practice that serves the production of philosophical knowledge.

This course focuses on the double bind of architecture as a material practice and an agent of knowledge production. We will discuss the importance of architecture in the formation of thought. It will draw attention to architecture as a cultural practice between intellectual reason and sensual reason. It was Nietzsche who already emphasized the close interrelation between philosophy and architecture and insisted on the philosopher’s need for appropriate spaces for thinking. He held that after the death of God “we need some recognition of what above all is lacking in our big cities: quiet and wide, expansive places for reflection. Places with long, high-ceilinged cloisters for bad or all too sunny weather”.

Participants:

Prof. Joerg Gleiter, Prof. Snjezana Prijic Samarzija, Prof. Petar Bojanic, Prof. Vladan Djokic, Prof. Zoran Lazovic, Prof. Ludger Schwarte, Prof. Carla Danani, Prof. Giusi Struimmello, Prof. Katharina Borsi, Dr. Sanja Bojanic, Dr. Luka Skansi, Dr. Mateja Kurir Borovčić Kasper Lægring, Roberto Bonturi, Fabiana Sforza, Jelena Radosavljević, Miloš Kostić, Madeleine Jessica Kennedy, Jovana Timotijević, Jovana Stojković, Hana Samaržija, Juan Almarza Anwandter, Stefana Dilova, Mirza Vranjakovic, Julian Franke, Sandra Meireis, Andrea Weigt, Theresa Rauch and Adria Daraban.

Seminars will start at 10.00 am in the morning with open end in the evening.

In order to leave enough time for the intellectual exchange presentations shall be limited to 20 minutes (students MA/BA) and 30 minutes all others.

The presentations will be followed by 30 minutes respectively 40 minutes of discussion.

An individually assigned moderator/commentator will help to guide through the discussions.

Timetable
Monday, 11th September 2017
10.00-11.00  | Welcome and registrations

Venue: IUC – Ul. don Frana Bulica 4, 20000, Dubrovnik

How to get there? 

11.00-12.00  | Welcome address of Directors of the Course

Presentation of all participants; setting the daily schedule

Time Title Lecturer
12.00

13.00

Opening session: Introduction to the course Prof. Joerg Gleiter
13.00

14.30

Lunch
14.30

15.30

Spaces of Reflection – where does philosophy take place? Prof. Ludger Schwarte

 

Comments: Prof. Snjezana Prijic Samarzija

15.30

16.30

Pages for thinking. From Corviale to “sensible wisdom” …. in a too short step. Prof. Carla Danani

 

Comments: Prof. Giusi Struimmello

16.30

17.00

Pause
17.00

18.00

Epistemic Implications of Neuroarchitecture Hana Samarzija

 

Comments: Prof. Carla Danani

Tuesday, 12th September 2017
Time Title Lecturer
10.00

11.00

The Acts of Project(ion) Prof. Petar Bojanic

 

Comments: Prof. Joerg Gleiter

11.00

12.00

A new rational aesthetic: notes on the culture of space Dr. Luka Skansi

 

Comments: Prof. Ludger Schwarte

12.00

13.00

Architecture, Space and Alienation: between Adorno and Lefebvre Dr. Mateja Kurir Borovcic

 

Comments: Dr. Luka Skansi

13.00

15.00

Lunch
15.00

16.00

Drawing the Knowledge of Urbanism Prof. Katharina Borsi

 

Comments: Prof. Joerg Gleiter

16.00

16.15

Pause
16.15

17.15

Knowledge Fields: Between Scientific and Design-Based Knowledge Prof. Vladan Djokic

 

Comments: Prof. Ludger Schwarte

17.15

18.15

Representations of the fragmentary in architecture Adria Daraban

 

Comments: Sandra Meireis

Wednesday, 13th September 2017
14.00

15.30

Reading Laboratory
Time Title Lecturer
15.30

16.30

Between Being and Becoming: towards a metaphysical reading of architectural signs Juan Almarza Anwandter

 

Comments: Prof. Joerg Gleiter

16.30

17.30

Nietzsche’s thoughts about Architecture Mirza Vranjakovic

 

Comments: Prof. Giusi Struimmello

17.30

18.00

Pause
18.00

19.00

Diagrams in Architecture: Agents of knowledge production? Julian Franke

 

Comments: Prof. Joerg Gleiter

Thursday, 14th September 2017
Time Title Lecturer
10.00

10.45

Mythologisations of Contemporary Belgradian Architecture Prof. Zoran Lazovic

 

Comments: Milos Kostic

10.45

11.30

Self-Managing Socialism and Urban Planning – The Case Study of General Plan of Belgrade 1972 Jelena Radosavljevic

 

Comments: Prof. Vladan Djokic

11.30

12.00

Pause
12.00

13.00

Exhibitions as Philosophy? Madeleine Kennedy

 

Comments: Hana Samarzija

13.00

14.30

Lunch
14.30

15.30

Exploring Ideas in your Senses. The capacity of imagination after Immanuel Kant explored in Oswald M. Ungers “City Metaphors” Andrea Weigt

 

Comments: Prof. Carla Danani

15.30

16.00

Pause
16.00

17.00

Semiotics of Architectural: Detail between Rationalization and Representation of Architecture Milos Kostic

 

Comments: Prof. Giusi Struimmello

17.00

18.00

The Perception of Space on the Base of Atmospheres Theresa Rauch

 

Comments: Prof. Joerg Gleiter

Friday, 15th September 2017
Time Title Lecturer
10.00

11.00

Nelson Goodman, Exemplification and Critiques of Modernist Architecture Kasper Laegring

 

Comments: Sandra Meireis

11.00

12.00

“Abandoning Home” – aporia of displacement Jovana Timotijevic

 

Comments: Prof. Joerg Gleiter

12.00

12.30

Pause
12.30

13.30

The Presence in Public Space Stefana Dilova

 

Comments: Madeleine Kennedy

13.30

14.00

Closing remarks, distribution of certificates

 

Back to the future – Livable life between nostalgia and utopia

As hundreds of representatives of civil society from Western Balkan countries assembled in Trieste for the Civil Society Forum, CAS co-organized a kick-off event which included the screening of the documentary “Trieste, Yugoslavia” and a lively debate themed “Back to the future – Livable life between nostalgia and utopia”. Introduced by Franz Karl Prueller of the ERSTE Foundation and Branka Panić from the European Fund for the Balkans, the event took place in the Revoltella Museum Gallery of Modern Art. CAS directors, staff, and fellows welcomed the diverse audience, which included civil society representatives from the region, academics and various local actors.

CAS’s choice of the documentary “Trieste, Yugoslavia” by Alessio Bozzer to open the discussions took advantage of the Forum’s special location in a city with an urban history closely intertwined with that of the Western Balkans. The documentary explored the particularly important role of Trieste for many Yugoslav citizens who traveled there during socialist time to buy goods, as the first city across a border which gradually became more open and more porous, rather unique in the overall context of the Cold War. The film pondered upon practices of border crossings and aspirations of shoppers and sellers alike. It touched upon the diverse experiences of people coming from republics close and far, to buy jeans or coffee, by car, train, or packed buses, creative strategies of coping with border regulations, while also mentioning the underlying tensions and discriminatory tones existing the host city regarding the visitors from the nearby country, with their alterity derived from ethnicity-based  stereotypes – with a longer history than the film alludes- and the ideological representations of a Cold War border. Ending abruptly with the scenes of emptied streets and stalls while wars descend upon former Yugoslavia and borders close, the film prompted a debate which shifted from nostalgia to utopia, perceptions from within the former Yugoslavia and the outer region, and musings of perspectives for freedom, equality and solidarity in the region.

 

The debate „Back to the future – Livable life between nostalgia and utopia” was moderated by CAS’s Vedran Džihić and featured special guest, Rade Šerbedžija, CAS SEE Honorary Fellow, Professor Emeritus at the University of Rijeka, who also appeared in the documentary. Vedran Džihić asked the panel, which also included Snježana Prijić-Samaržija, Chancellor, University of Rijeka, Marek Szilvasi, CAS SEE Fellow and Gruia Bădescu, CAS SEE Fellow, to spontaneously reflect on three concepts that relate both to the film and the challenges and opportunities of civil society in the Western Balkans: nostalgia for the past, utopias for the future, and the meaning of freedom in the contemporary context.  The panel participants first approached the film from their positionality: Snježana Prijić-Samaržija and Rade Šerbedžija as citizens of former Yugoslavia for whom both trips to Trieste and the discontinuities of the 1990s triggered memories and emotional reflections,  Marek Szilvasi and Gruia Bădescu as growing up in other socialist societies – Czechoslovakia and Romania, respectively- for which borders were distinctively rigid and for which Yugoslavia, with its open borders and closeness to the West exerted a particular fascination. The two CAS fellows also discussed the tensions that emerge from the film regarding material aspirations and disparities, ideological clashes, as well as in the difference between accounts of celebrated intellectuals and artists, and the anonymized shopper, who becomes a mere “witness” in the account of the film.

These tensions between whose stories, whose narratives, and whose nostalgia were to be discussed emerged throughout the debate. While common tropes of urban versus rural, kulturni and nekulturni ljudi, appeared as explanatory frameworks of 1990s events, Bădescu pointed out from his research in Sarajevo how nostalgias for a cosmopolitan past could also lead to different forms of exclusion of newcomers, burning possible bridges and utopias for what Hanna Arendt called a “world in common”.  Arendt was frequently mentioned by panelists, with Džihić inquiring about freedom from the perspective of both Arendt and material relations. Both Bădescu and Szilvasi addressed the question of freedom from its relationship to human dignity, equality and solidarity. Snježana Prijić-Samaržija brought forward the role of CAS as an institution which embodies the aspiration to research both issues surrounding the past as well as potentialities and utopias at the scale of Southeastern Europe. All throughout, Rade Šerbedžija’s interventions captured the lived experience of the events evoked in the film, nostalgia and exile, sublimated in creative acts, which included two live performances on stage of his songs. They included “Second Call”, which was translated in English and read by CAS Fellow Nataša Sardžoska. His second act, Djevojka iz moga kraja closed the debate, which was followed by a reception and a tour of the exhibit of the Revoltella Museum Gallery of Modern Art. The Civil Society Forum started the following morning, with Trieste again a stage of diverse people and perspectives from the Western Balkans.

 

Gruia Bădescu

Sites of memory and the criminalization of authoritarian pasts: Interrogating Goli Otok in a regional and transnational frame.

“A repertoire of transitional justice practices has been mobilized in the last decades in states that experienced various incarnations of authoritarian regimes, from Latin America to Central and Eastern Europe. From trials to incriminating reports, from lustration to political declarations, these past regimes have been the object of diverse practices and discourses of criminalization. One important aspect has been the memorialization of sites of political violence, which has been mobilized by an array of actors to suit particular narratives of criminalizing past regimes. In this global context, the debates surrounding the memorialization of Goli Otok in Croatia mirror a number of processes which occurred elsewhere, while deeply connected to the specificity of memory politics in Croatia and former Yugoslavia. A political prison for mainly socialist detainees after the Tito-Stalin split, Goli Otok has been marginal to local memorialization practices, but has recently became a locus of initiatives and narratives fitting different visions and agendas. In this presentation, based on ongoing research, I scrutinize strategies and motivations of a variety of actors, the idiosyncrasies of the Yugoslav and Croatian situation, while situating it in the larger context of Central and Eastern European regional criminalization of communism and in the transnational circulation of practices between memory regions. I discuss how perspectives of place and memorialization of sites contribute to our understanding of criminalization, and how the entanglements of memories and actors function at a variety of scales, reflecting on the spatialization of multidirectional memories.”


Gruia Bădescu’s research and practice bridge the spatial and the social, with a particular interest in how interventions in urban space relate to societal and political processes of dealing with a difficult past. After his BA in Geography and European Studies from Middlebury College and his MSc in City Design and Social Science from the Cities Programme at the LSE, he worked in urban design and integrated urban development in Romania, Georgia, Armenia and Moldova. He later conducted his PhD research at the Centre for Urban Conflicts Research, Department of Architecture, University of Cambridge, where he examined the relationship between the reconstruction of cities after war and the process of coming to terms with the past, with a focus on Belgrade and Sarajevo. In 2015-2016, Gruia was a Departmental Lecturer in Human Geography at the University of Oxford, after which he embarked on a research project in Chile with an AHRC-Labex grant, exploring processes of memorialization of sites used for political violence during the military dictatorship and their transnational dimension, linking them with South-East Europe. Gruia joined CAS at Rijeka to continue his research around the debates on memorializing the site of Goli Otok, as well as to explore the heritage and memory dimension of urban transformations in Rijeka within the context of the European Capital of Culture.

 

II Ad-Ri SeminaRi

History&Culture Research Seminar-Ri(jeka) 2017

A CAS SEE Event. Conception FFRi History & Cultural Studies

List of the Discussants (in bold paper presenters and organizers)

Gruia Badescu (CAS, Rijeka), Carla Konta (Università di Trieste), Sarah Czerny (Filozofski Fakultet, Rijeka), Neža Čebron Lipovec (Univerza na Primorskem, Koper), Vanni D’Alessio (Filozofski Fakultet, Rijeka, Università di Napoli), Franko Dota (Filozofski Fakultet, Zagreb), Ivan Jeličić (Università di Trieste), Marko Klavora (History Museum of Nova Gorica), Jernej Kosi (University of Ljubljana, University of Graz), Mateja Kurir (CAS, Rijeka), Daša Ličen (Research Centre of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Institute of Slovenian Ethnology, Ljubljana), Gašper Mithans (ZRS Koper Capodistria), Gregor Moder (CAS, Rijeka), Marija Ott Franolić (CAS, Rijeka), Vjeran Pavlaković (Filozofski Fakultet, Rijeka), Tea Perinčić (Pomorski i povijesni Muzej Hrvatskog primorja, Rijeka), Nataša Sardžoska (CAS, Rijeka), Katja Hrobat Virloget (Univerza na Primorskem, Koper).

WORKSHOP SESSIONS

9.15  |  PLACE AND MEMORY SESSION (CAS SEE, Sveučilišni odjeli building, 8th floor)

  1. CAS SEE Scholar Session

GRUIA BADESCU

Sites of memory and the criminalization of authoritarian pasts: Interrogating Goli Otok in a regional and transnational frame

10.30 |  Coffee break

10.45  |  II. Transnational Adriatic Session

  • Between memories and oblivions. Istrian towns after population transfers in 20th century (Katja)
  • Koper: Population transfer and architecture after WW II (Neža)
  • Reinventing Habsburg Cuisine in 21st Century Trieste (Daša)

12.30 |  Lunch Break (Fusion, Kampus Trsat)

 14.00 | EVERYDAY HISTORIES SESSION  (CAS SEE, 8th floor)

  1. Interwar Post-Habsburg Societies
  • Transforming local identities: Prekmurje after the dissolution of Austria-Hungary (Jernej)
  • Religious changes in diocese of Trieste and Capodistria/Koper in interwar period (Gašper)
  1. Yugoslav Societies in War and Peace
  • The Burdens of Milkmaids: Analysing their Movement through the Concept of Flow (Sarah)
  • A “Pure and Chaste” Socialist Revolution: Sexuality and Warfare in the Yugoslav National Liberation War (NOR) (Franko)

16.30 |  SUMMER SESSION: PROJECTS RESULTS AND NEW RESEARCH DOCKYARDS

 (Locations to be confirmed: Part A: CAS SEE, Sveučilišni odjeli building, 8th floor,  Part B: Empeduja Beach Bar, Bivio, Kantrida)

  • Heroes we love? Monuments of the National-liberation movement in Istria between memories, care, and collective silence (Project results presentation, Neža & Katja)
  • ARSENALS OF NEW PROJECTS IN HISTORY AND ANTHROPOLOGY (Discussion on methodologies, possibilities, perspectives).

18.00 | SRDELE & MORE SESSIONs: Final Discussions, new projects, plans, conclusion & Grill

(Empeduja Beach Bar, Bivio, Kantrida)

FOR PARTICIPATION PLEASE CONTACT:  dalessio@ffri.hr

Civil Society Forum Trieste of the Western Balkans Summit Series

Screening of the documentary “Trieste, Yugoslavia”

Date: Monday, July 10, 2017

Venue: Revoltella Museum Gallery of Modern Art, Via Armando Diaz 27, Trieste


18.00 – 18.30 | Welcome speech

Franz Karl Prueller, ERSTE Foundation

Branka Panic, European Fund for the Balkans

18.30 – 20.30 | Screening of the documentary movie: “Trieste, Yugoslavia”

Discussion: „Back to the future – Livable life between nostalgia and utopia“; organized in cooperation with Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe (CAS SEE), University of Rijeka

Special guest: Rade Serbedzija, CAS SEE Honorary Fellow, Professor Emeritus at the University of Rijeka

Speakers:

Snjezana Prijic-Samarzija, Chancellor, University of Rijeka

Gruia Bădescu, CAS SEE Fellow, University of Rijeka

Marek Szilvasi, CAS SEE Fellow, University of Rijeka

Mateja Kurir, CAS SEE Fellow, University of Rijeka

Gregor Moder, CAS SEE Fellow, University of Rijeka

Marija Ott Franolic, CAS SEE Fellow, University of Rijeka

Natasha Sardzoska, CAS SEE Fellow, University of Rijeka

Moderator:

Vedran Dzihic, Austrian Institute for International Affairs, Vienna; CAS SEE, University of Rijeka


20.30 – 21.30 | Dinner Reception at the Revoltella Museum Gallery of Modern Art

LIBERAL DEMOCRACY IN THE WEST / THE END OF HISTORY 25 YEARS LATER

PUBLIC LECTURE

by Professor Francis Fukuyama

Olivier Nomellini Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI) Stanford University

Date: 04 July 2017 / 19.30 – 22.00

Venue: Faculty of Political Sciences, University of Sarajevo

Moderation:

Asim Mujkić, Faculty of Political Sciences, University of Sarajevo

Participants in the discussion:

Petar Bojanić – Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory Belgrade, CAS SEE (UNIRI)

Gruia Badescu; Mateja Kurir-Borovčić; Gregor Moder; Marija Ott-Franolić; Nataša Sardžoski;  Marek Silvazsi –Center for Advanced Studies Fellows, University of Rijeka (CAS SEE, UNIRI)

Marjan Ivković – Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory Belgrade

Gazela Pudar Draško – Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory Belgrade

Damir Kapidžić, Nerzuk Ćurak, Nermina Mujagić, Hamza Karčić – Faculty of Political Sciencies, Sarajevo

Francis Fukuyama has written widely on issues in development and international politics. His book, The End of History and the Last Man, was published by Free Press in 1992 and has appeared in over twenty foreign editions. Fukuyama’s “end of history” thesis was an influential attempt to make sense of the post-cold-war world. In this discussion, Fukuyama will reflect on his ideas and if they survived the tides of criticism and political change.

Francis Fukuyama received his B.A. from Cornell University in classics, and his Ph.D. from Harvard in Political Science. He was a member of the Political Science Department of the RAND Corporation, and of the Policy Planning Staff of the US Department of State. He previously taught at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) of Johns Hopkins University and at George Mason University’s School of Public Policy. He served as a member of the President’s Council on Bioethics from 2001-2004. Dr. Fukuyama is chairman of the editorial board of The American Interest, which he helped to found in 2005. He is a senior fellow at the Johns Hopkins SAIS Foreign Policy Institute, and a non-resident fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and the Center for Global Development. He holds honorary doctorates from Connecticut College, Doane College, Doshisha University (Japan), Kansai University (Japan), Aarhus University (Denmark), and the Pardee Rand Graduate School. He is a member of the Board of Governors of the Pardee RAND Graduate School, the Board of Directors of the National Endowment for Democracy, and a member of the advisory board for the Journal of Democracy. He is also a member of the American Political Science Association, the Council on Foreign Relations, and the Pacific Council for International Affairs.

Organizers: Faculty of Political Sciences, University of Sarajevo; Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade; Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe, University of Rijeka; Center for Ethics, Law and Applied Philosophy, Belgrade

 

2017-2018 CAS SEE FELLOWSHIP RECIPIENTS

The Center for Advanced Studies, Southeast Europe (CAS SEE) at the University of Rijeka is pleased to announce the recipients of the 2017-2018 CAS SEE Fellowship Awards.

The purpose of the CAS SEE Fellowship Programme is to further the research or creative work in the humanities and humanistic social sciences in the Balkans. Fellows will present their work within the CAS-Collegium on a bi-weekly basis, creating an intellectually heterogeneous atmosphere and fostering a productive self-examination and even friction, which may lead to new and unexpected ideas and innovation.

Please join us in congratulating the following 2017-2018 Spring and Autumn CAS-SEE Fellowship Awards, University of Rijeka recipients:

Spring

Mateja Kurir Borovčić (Ljubljana, Slovenia) Architecture as ideology: the perspectives of critical theory from modernism to the present

Gruia Badescu (Oxford University, UK) Spatializing Cultural Policies and Activism in Croatia and Romania: A Comparative, Transnational Study

Marek Szilvasi (Budapest, Hungary) Between Commodity and Common Public Good: Access to Water and its Relevance for Roma People in Europe

Natasha Sardžoska (Skopje, Macedonia) Mapping of spatial memory in limitrophe cities, landscapes, borders and bodies in Istria

Gregor Moder (University of Ljubljana, Slovenia) Critical Theory. Truth in Politics: Comedy, Sophistry and Critique

Marija Ott Franolić (Zagreb, Croatia) Read, Think, Act

Autumn

Milorad Kapetanović (London, UK) Regulation of Informal Construction in Rijeka in the Anticipation of European Capital of Culture Rijeka

Mónica Cano Abadía (Zaragoza, Spain) The Re-Radicalization of Critical Thinking: Toward a Global Social Justice

Chiara Destri (University of Milan, Italy) No Democracy For Devils: Democratic Authority, Citizenship and Parties

Caterina Bonora (University of Bremen; Jacobs University Bremen, Germany) Ne da(vi)mo Beograd and the “new wave” activism in the post-Yugoslav space 

Tom Whyman (University of Essex, UK) Research Proposal: Adorno’s Concept of Natural-History: Crisis and Critical Theory

Davide Pala (University of Torino, Italy) World Poverty, Radical Inequalities and Neo-Republicanism: What Does Non-Domination Normatively Demand and Institutionally Imply in regard to the Poorest?

Carlo Burelli (University of Milan, Italy) A Theory of Order 

ANTON MARKOČ

Are There Genuine Reasons Against Intending Harm?
  “Are bad intentions wrongs per se? In other words, are there normative reasons against intending harm and other bad effects which are not derived from reasons against harming or bringing those effects?
The defenders of the Doctrine of Double Effect and all those who subscribe to the thesis that intentions are non-derivatively relevant to the moral permissibility of actions, must answer these questions affirmatively. For there to be a genuine deontological constraint against intending harm, reasons against intending harm must be reasons per se.
In this talk, I evaluate and find wanting three kinds of theoretical justifications of reasons against intending harm as reasons per se: agent-centered, victim-centered, and impersonal. They state, respectively, that bad intentions are wrongs because they are bad for the agent, or for the victim, or because they are bad, period.
I conclude that although the failure of these justifications is not a decisive evidence to think that there are no genuine reasons against intending harm, it is a good enough evidence to raise serious doubt about it.”
 
Anton Markoč is currently a post-doctoral fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies at the University of Rijeka. He holds a PhD and an MA in Philosophy from Central European University and BSc and specialist degrees in Political Science from University of Montenegro. He specializes in moral and political philosophy, broadly construed, and has competence in similar fields, including the history of moral and political thought, moral psychology, and philosophy of action. His PhD dissertation, “It’s Not the Thought that Counts: An Essay on the Irrelevance of Intentions to the Moral Permissibility of Actions”, was supervised by János Kis and it defended the view that intentions are non-derivatively irrelevant to the moral permissibility of actions. In 2015, he was a Fellow in Philosophy at Harvard University, where he was supervised by T. M. Scanlon. In 2015-2016, he was an adjunct lecturer at University of Donja Gorica in Podgorica, Montenegro, where he taught courses in moral and political philosophy, while in 2014, he worked as a tutor in philosophy at CEU’s Roma Graduate Preparation Program.