CAS SEE Fellows

Conference “Cultures in translation: a paradigm for Europe”

Culture in traduzione: un paradigma per l’Europa | Kulture u prijevodu: paradigma za Europu

 Date: 18-19 October 2017, Belgrade

Venue: Italian Culture Institute in Belgrade

Languages: English, Italian and Serbian

Translation: Simultaneous

PROVISIONAL PROGRAMME:
Day 1  |  18 October 2017

9.00-10.00 | Registration of participants and welcome coffee

10.00-10.30 | Opening lecture

⌑ Petar Bojanic, IFDT (10 min)

⌑ Davide Scalmani, IIC (10 min)

⌑ Irena Fiket (10 min)

I         Translatability and Untranslatables: Examples and Reflections

10.30-12.30 | Moderator: Milos Cipranic

Speakers:

10.30-11.00 | Snežana Milinković, University of Belgrade, Professor of Italian literature and translator (Tradurre è impossibile ma necessario) language: Italian

11.00-11.30 | Annette Đurović, University of Belgrade (Od „Personenkennzahl“-a do „Personenkennziffer“-a ili Put između raspada dva sistema u budućnost) language: Serbian

11.30-12.00 | Deja Piletic, University of Montenegro (I dottori del triennio – doktori trogodišnjih studija? Le sfide della traduzione giurata dall’italiano in montenegrino e viceversa) language: Italian

12.00-12.30 | Discussion

12.30-14.00 | Buffet Lunch

II      Philosophy in Translation: Translation as a Philosophical Problem

14.00-17.00 | Moderator: Sasa Hrnjez

Speakers:

14.00-14.30 | Luca Illetterati, University of Padova, Professor of Theoretical Philosophy (Animali che traducono) language: Italian

14.30-15.00 | Adriana Zaharijevic, IFDT, Member of Association of Literary Translators of Serbia (Prevođenje filozofije: slučaj pojma agency) language: Serbian

15-15.30 | Discusssion

15.30-16.00 | Gaetano Chiurazzi, University of Torino, Professor of Theoretical Philosophy (La storicità della traduzione) language: Italian

16.00-16.30 | Zdravko Kobe, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia (Traduzione e trasformazione) language: Italian

16.30-17.00  | Discussion

20.00 | Dinner (Restaurant Savski Venac)

Day 2  |  19 October 2017
III      Translation, Interculturality and European Identity Politics

9.30-13.30 | Moderator: Burelli Carlo

Speakers:

9.30-10.00 | Aleksandra Mančić, Senior Research Associate – Institute for Literature and Arts, Belgrade and translator – Member of Association of Literary Translators of Serbia (Translation as Intercultural Practice and its Relevance for the Future of Europe) language: Serbian

10.00-10.30 | Silvana Borutti, Pavia, Professor of Theoretical Philosophy (L’antropologia e la traduzione come modello della comunicazione interculturale) language: Italian

10.30-11.00 | Discusssion

11.00-11.30 | Djurdja Trajkovic, IFDT (Madness of Pierre Menard: Power of the Untranslatable) language: English

11.30-12.00 | Michael Oustinoff, literary critic and theorist of translation, Professor at the University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, France (Globalization and the Translation of Imaginaries)

12.00-12.30 | Olimpia Giuliana Loddo, The Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe (CAS SEE) Rijeka, University of Cagliari (Translating written norms into normative pictures) language: English

12.30-13.30 | Discussion

13.30-14.30 | Buffet Lunch

IV     Actuality of Translation – Translation as Activity

14.30-17.00 | Moderator: Davide Pala

Speakers:

14.30-15.00 | Gojko Bozovic, Arhipelag, Beograd (Izazovi savremenog prevođenja i savremenog izdavaštva) language: Serbian

15.00-15.30 | Mirna Zelic Pokaz, Head of Croatian Language Department, DGT EC (Translating for the European Commission) language: English

15.30-16.00 | Katja Stergar, Slovenian Book Agency JAK/Traduki / Antje Contius, S. Fischer Stiftung/Traduki (Traduki’s work and implications) language: English

16.00-16.30 | Discussion

16.30-17.00 | Conclusion of the conference

Davide Scalmani, IIC

EUNIC Serbia representative (name still TBC)

20.00 | Dinner (Restaurant in Skadarlija)

FEMINIST SELF-DEFENCE WORKSHOPS

The Center for Advanced Studies has initiated a feminist self-defence workshop organized in collaboration with the Center for Women’s Studies (Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences), taking place at the Academy of Applied Arts at the University of Rijeka. The course will last until the end of the winter semester with guidance of current CAS SEE Fellow, Mónica Cano Abadía.

“Against sexist aggressions it is necessary to learn a series of both physical and psychosocial strategies. Self-defence is a defence against prior aggressions to safeguard our physical and mental integrity. The right to self-defence against harm or danger is entirely legitimate. In the case of women, many of the aggressions that we suffer on a daily basis come from structural misogynist violence. Therefore, we speak of feminist self-defence,  as  we  defend  ourselves  against  the  violence  of  both  the  particular aggressors and the patriarchal system.

Feminist self-defence goes beyond learning physical techniques. It tries to reinforce the autonomy of women in the public and private space enhancing our physical, emotional and social security. It is also a way of life that requires mechanisms of prevention, critical analysis of our gender-biased social practices, and the creation of networks of sorority to encourage active personal and collective defence.” – Mónica Cano Abadía

Maximum number of participants: 15

Aimed to: All women (no matter their age or physical condition)

Venue: Ul. Slavka Krautzeka 83, HR-51000, Rijeka

Workshop applications at: cas@cas.uniri.hr

 

BOOKS, PAPERS AND REVIEWS PUBLISHED BY CAS SEE FELLOWS

CAS SEE fellows have published or are about to publish an impressive list of publications in the period between 2015 and 2017:

Benli, A. E. (2016) Implementing global taxes on natural resources: A social choice approach. Diacritica Vol. 30, No. 2 (pp. 15-32)

Carabelli, G. (2015) Review of the book The Political Economy of Divided Islands: Unified Geographies, Multiple Polities. Urban Island Studies, Vol. 1 (pp. 187-189)

Cerovac, I. (2017) Epistemic Democracy: A Guest Editor’s Preface. Etica & Politica – Ethics & Politics, Vol. 19, No. 2 (str. 161-168)

Cerovac, I. (2017) The democratic and participatory potential of Europarties, Policy Briefs: FEPS and Renner Institute (May 2017)

Cerovac, I. (2017, forthcoming) Epistemic Liberalism. Prolegomena, Vol. 14 No. 2 (forthcoming)

Hodges, A. (2016) Croatian Language Standardization and the Production of Nationalised Political Subjects through Language: Perspectives from the Social Sciences. Etnološka tribina : Godišnjak Hrvatskog etnološkog društva, Vol.46, No.39 (pp. 3-45)

Hodges, A. and Brentin, D. (forthcoming) Football from below in South-Eastern Europe: An Introduction. Soccer & Society (forthcoming)

Marek, S. (2017) Parallel Claims for the Human Right to Water: The Case of Roma in Slovenia. In: Archibugi, D. and Benli, A. E. [Eds.] (2017) Claiming Citizenship Rights in Europe. London: Routledge

Markoč, A. (2017) Intentions and Permissibility: A Confusion of Moral Categories? The Journal of Value Inquiry.

Rexhepi, P. (2015) Mainstreaming Islamophobia: The Politics of European Enlargement and the Balkan Crime-Terror Nexus. East European Quarterly, Vol. 43, No. 2-3 (pp. 189-214)

Sardelić, J. (2016) The position and agency of the ‘irregularized’: Romani migrants as European semi-citizens. Politics Journal.

Sardžoska, N. (2017) Limitrope Border Zones: The Polisemic Spaces of Istria. Research in Social Change, Vol. 9, No. 1 (pp. 69-82)

Sasso, A. (forthcoing, 2017) ‘Observation, not resolution’. The final congresses of the Bosnian communists (1989-1990). In. Kamberović, H. (Ed.) (forthcoing, 2017) Bosna i Hercegovina u socijalističkoj Jugoslaviji: od Ustava 1946. do Deklaracije o nezavisnosti 1991. godine – Zbornik Radova. Sarajevo: Institut za Istoriju – UHMIS.

Sasso, A. (2016) Review of Robert Donia’s Radovan Karadžić – Architect of the Bosnian Genocide, Diacronie, Vol. 28, No. 4 (pp 7-8)

Walton, J. F. (2017) Muslim Civil Society and the Politics of Religious Freedom in Turkey. New York: Oxford University Press.

Walton, J. F. (2015) Labours of Inter-religious Tolerance: Cultural and Spatial Intimacy in Croatia and Turkey.” Cambridge Journal of Anthropology, Vol. 33, No. 2 (pp. 59-76)

Walton, J. F. (2015) The Institutions and Discourses of Hizmet, and Their Discontents. In: Marty, M. (Ed.) (2015) Hizmet Means Service: Perspectives on an Alternative Path within Islam. University of California Press.

Walton, J. F. (2015) Everyday I’m Çapulling!’: Global Flows and Local Frictions of Gezi. In: David, I. and Toktamis, K. (Eds.) (2015) The Gezi Protests and Beyond: Contesting AKP Rule. Amsterdam University Press.

 

Back to the future – Livable life between nostalgia and utopia

As hundreds of representatives of civil society from Western Balkan countries assembled in Trieste for the Civil Society Forum, CAS co-organized a kick-off event which included the screening of the documentary “Trieste, Yugoslavia” and a lively debate themed “Back to the future – Livable life between nostalgia and utopia”. Introduced by Franz Karl Prueller of the ERSTE Foundation and Branka Panić from the European Fund for the Balkans, the event took place in the Revoltella Museum Gallery of Modern Art. CAS directors, staff, and fellows welcomed the diverse audience, which included civil society representatives from the region, academics and various local actors.

CAS’s choice of the documentary “Trieste, Yugoslavia” by Alessio Bozzer to open the discussions took advantage of the Forum’s special location in a city with an urban history closely intertwined with that of the Western Balkans. The documentary explored the particularly important role of Trieste for many Yugoslav citizens who traveled there during socialist time to buy goods, as the first city across a border which gradually became more open and more porous, rather unique in the overall context of the Cold War. The film pondered upon practices of border crossings and aspirations of shoppers and sellers alike. It touched upon the diverse experiences of people coming from republics close and far, to buy jeans or coffee, by car, train, or packed buses, creative strategies of coping with border regulations, while also mentioning the underlying tensions and discriminatory tones existing the host city regarding the visitors from the nearby country, with their alterity derived from ethnicity-based  stereotypes – with a longer history than the film alludes- and the ideological representations of a Cold War border. Ending abruptly with the scenes of emptied streets and stalls while wars descend upon former Yugoslavia and borders close, the film prompted a debate which shifted from nostalgia to utopia, perceptions from within the former Yugoslavia and the outer region, and musings of perspectives for freedom, equality and solidarity in the region.

 

The debate „Back to the future – Livable life between nostalgia and utopia” was moderated by CAS’s Vedran Džihić and featured special guest, Rade Šerbedžija, CAS SEE Honorary Fellow, Professor Emeritus at the University of Rijeka, who also appeared in the documentary. Vedran Džihić asked the panel, which also included Snježana Prijić-Samaržija, Chancellor, University of Rijeka, Marek Szilvasi, CAS SEE Fellow and Gruia Bădescu, CAS SEE Fellow, to spontaneously reflect on three concepts that relate both to the film and the challenges and opportunities of civil society in the Western Balkans: nostalgia for the past, utopias for the future, and the meaning of freedom in the contemporary context.  The panel participants first approached the film from their positionality: Snježana Prijić-Samaržija and Rade Šerbedžija as citizens of former Yugoslavia for whom both trips to Trieste and the discontinuities of the 1990s triggered memories and emotional reflections,  Marek Szilvasi and Gruia Bădescu as growing up in other socialist societies – Czechoslovakia and Romania, respectively- for which borders were distinctively rigid and for which Yugoslavia, with its open borders and closeness to the West exerted a particular fascination. The two CAS fellows also discussed the tensions that emerge from the film regarding material aspirations and disparities, ideological clashes, as well as in the difference between accounts of celebrated intellectuals and artists, and the anonymized shopper, who becomes a mere “witness” in the account of the film.

These tensions between whose stories, whose narratives, and whose nostalgia were to be discussed emerged throughout the debate. While common tropes of urban versus rural, kulturni and nekulturni ljudi, appeared as explanatory frameworks of 1990s events, Bădescu pointed out from his research in Sarajevo how nostalgias for a cosmopolitan past could also lead to different forms of exclusion of newcomers, burning possible bridges and utopias for what Hanna Arendt called a “world in common”.  Arendt was frequently mentioned by panelists, with Džihić inquiring about freedom from the perspective of both Arendt and material relations. Both Bădescu and Szilvasi addressed the question of freedom from its relationship to human dignity, equality and solidarity. Snježana Prijić-Samaržija brought forward the role of CAS as an institution which embodies the aspiration to research both issues surrounding the past as well as potentialities and utopias at the scale of Southeastern Europe. All throughout, Rade Šerbedžija’s interventions captured the lived experience of the events evoked in the film, nostalgia and exile, sublimated in creative acts, which included two live performances on stage of his songs. They included “Second Call”, which was translated in English and read by CAS Fellow Nataša Sardžoska. His second act, Djevojka iz moga kraja closed the debate, which was followed by a reception and a tour of the exhibit of the Revoltella Museum Gallery of Modern Art. The Civil Society Forum started the following morning, with Trieste again a stage of diverse people and perspectives from the Western Balkans.

 

Civil Society Forum Trieste of the Western Balkans Summit Series

Screening of the documentary “Trieste, Yugoslavia”

Date: Monday, July 10, 2017

Venue: Revoltella Museum Gallery of Modern Art, Via Armando Diaz 27, Trieste


18.00 – 18.30 | Welcome speech

Franz Karl Prueller, ERSTE Foundation

Branka Panic, European Fund for the Balkans

18.30 – 20.30 | Screening of the documentary movie: “Trieste, Yugoslavia”

Discussion: „Back to the future – Livable life between nostalgia and utopia“; organized in cooperation with Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe (CAS SEE), University of Rijeka

Special guest: Rade Serbedzija, CAS SEE Honorary Fellow, Professor Emeritus at the University of Rijeka

Speakers:

Snjezana Prijic-Samarzija, Chancellor, University of Rijeka

Gruia Bădescu, CAS SEE Fellow, University of Rijeka

Marek Szilvasi, CAS SEE Fellow, University of Rijeka

Mateja Kurir, CAS SEE Fellow, University of Rijeka

Gregor Moder, CAS SEE Fellow, University of Rijeka

Marija Ott Franolic, CAS SEE Fellow, University of Rijeka

Natasha Sardzoska, CAS SEE Fellow, University of Rijeka

Moderator:

Vedran Dzihic, Austrian Institute for International Affairs, Vienna; CAS SEE, University of Rijeka


20.30 – 21.30 | Dinner Reception at the Revoltella Museum Gallery of Modern Art

NATASHA SARDZOSKA

Mapping of spatial memory in limitrophe cities: border-landscapes and border-bodies

“My project draws on limitrophe cities and interzones within border-zones landscapes and deserted places where abandon, detachment, twisted memory and emotional representation shape the place as liminal and as ontologically uncertain. I argue border passages, which are today spaces deprived from meaning, or rather Phantomgrenzen, such as former Schengen crossings, such as empty and forgotten architectures of the post-Yugoslavian period, where space is under continuous reconfiguration and, at some point, becomes politically critical and artistically relevant. Thus, those spaces, although deprived from substantial phenomenological nexus, are impregnated with the emotional memory of a place that no longer exist; in this sense, they are not places where something ends and something else begins its existence, but rather places where something starts its presencing (to name few actions which gain their semantical denomination at the border crossing itself: smuggling, trafficking, exile, homelessness, expatriation etc.).

I elaborate political meanings of borders, which are perpetually blurred and shifted in tidal geography, the cultural mummification, the erasure of preexisting maps and the revival of “quick sand” porous boundaries. I focus on the production of flows of non-targeted displacements and dislocations, indeterminate journeys and nostalgia for a lost space instigated by the political shattering. I will, therefore, present the border-artwork of Sara Salamon, visual artist from Rijeka, who is disintegrating, misplacing, reinventing and questioning the invisible phantom-border passage between Gorizia and Nova Gorica, unveiling interrelations of cultural mutation processes from former spatial memory towards transitory emotional memory. The goal is to rethink the interconnected mappings, which have become marginalized and diasporic but at the same time a center and a nucleus of cognitive anxiety proliferating movements and unpredictable spatial trajectories. The question I am tackling is: is it so important to draw boundaries, charts and maps when the world has turned culturally liminal, flow and creolizing?”

Natasha Sardzoska was born in Skopje in 1979. Researcher, interpreter and translator (IT, FR, EN, ES, PT, MK, SR), Italian language professor, poet, writer, journalist and cultural manager, she has been living and working in Paris, Milano, Stuttgart, Brussels, Lisbon, Belgrade, Heidelberg, Bergamo and Skopje. She holds a Bachelor in Italian language and literature and comparative literature from the University Ss. Cyril and Methodius in Skopje. With the Erasmus Mundus fellowship from the European Commission she has obtained a Master in media and cultural studies from the New University of Lisbon, the University of Perpignan and the University of Bergamo and a PhD in cultural anthropology from the Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen, University of Bergamo and Sorbonne Nouvelle in Paris.She has taught at Schiller International University in Heidelberg, the University for Tourism in Skopje, the University of Bergamo and the South-East European University “Max Van der Stoel”. She is part of the research group Phantom Borders at the Humbolt University in Berlin. She has been working as interpreter for the Senate of the Italian Republic, the Italian Ministry of Justice, the Italian National Antimafia Bureau, the International Organization for Migration, IBF Consulting, the Macedonian Ministry of Defense, the Macedonian Academy for Judges and Prosecutors and the European Commission and as expert in the French National Agency for Higher Education Evaluation AERES. She was editor of the official magazine of the Erasmus Mundus Association, where she was serving as Public Information Officer, and has interviewed well-known politicians amongst which Marielle De Sarnez.

She has attended international conferences and published in international reviews. She cooperates with the reviews Doppiozero, Nuova Prosa, Milan and Transmidia, Rio de Janeiro. She has published several poetry books, essays and literary translations (Saramago, Carducci, Pasolini, Tabucchi, Carneiro, Carvalho, Tavares, Bojunga, Couto, Bufalino, Braga, Collodi, Piperino) from Portuguese and Italian language. She collaborates with Radio Capodistria for the in-depth analysis program Il Vaso di Pandora, in Italian language. She has founded the Argentinian tango association in Macedonia promoting Argentine culture in the Balkans.

CAS SEE FELLOWS PANEL IN VIENNA

The second day of the Aktionstage: Refugees – Migration – Democracy Symposium held at the Akademie der bildenden Künste Wien hosted a panel with the 4th generation of CAS-SEE Fellows. CAS-SEE Director Petar Bojanic provided Input on the subject of Europe, Refugees, Hospitality, Destitution.
The 6th panel of the Symposium, entitled Towards a new research agenda: Debate and exchange on current topics and critical junctures for thinking and researching in the field of refugees, migration and democracy, hosted young speakers that provided fresh perspectives on the subject.

Panelists:
• Mariana Fragkou (Greek Council for Refugees, Athens),
• Andjelka Pantović (Asylum Protection Centre, Belgrade),
• Sanja Bojanić (CAS SEE, University of Rijeka),
• Kevin Hinterberger (IWM, University of Vienna), Ilker Ataç (University of Vienna),
• Ernesto C. Sferrazza Papa (CAS SEE Fellow, Rijeka/Torino)
• Deana Jovanović (CAS SEE Fellow)
• Carlos González Villa (CAS SEE Fellow)
• Andrew Hodges (CAS SEE Fellow)
• Anton Markoč (CAS SEE Fellow)
Moderation: Heide Hammer (Refugee Convoy – Schienenersatzverkehr für Flüchtlinge, Vienna)

Foto:  Sabine Schwaighofer, Initiative Minderheiten | Kristina Smoljanovic, CAS SEE

Institutions in Action: The Nature and the Role of Institutions in the Real World

Political, social, economic, and legal institutions exert a great impact on the lives of individuals as social beings, as well as on those individuals’ own understanding of themselves, their potentialities, and aspirations. In big societies, institutions also offer information regarding what others do or tend to do. Still, in the last thirty years, both in political theory and in practice, the role of institutions has been seriously threatened by an ideological struggle against the welfare state and by a growing emphasis on individual responsibility and an individualist ethos. Once again we find ourselves having to examine the importance of the role of social institutions, their nature as actors, as well as their mutual influences.

Venue:  Faculty for Humanities, University of Rijeka, Campus, Sveučilišna avenija 4, 51000 Rijeka

Organizer:  Center for Advanced Studies–Southeast Europe, University of Rijeka, LabOnt–Department of Philosophy, University of Torino in cooperation with the Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade

4th CAS SEE International Conference

PLAYING BY THE RULES

Institutions in Action: The Nature and the Role of Institutions in the Real World

May 26, 2016 / 19:00-21:00

Round Table “The Role of Institutions – Experiences and Prospects”

and Opening Reception

Hotel Jadran (Šetalište XIII divizije 46, 51000, Rijeka)

Welcome Addresses: Predrag Sustar (Ministry of Science, Education and Sports of Croatia), Pero Lucin (Rector, University of Rijeka), Snjezana Prijic Samarzija (Vice rector and director of CAS SEE,University of Rijeka)

Introductory: Nebojsa Zelic (Faculty for Humanities, University of Rijeka)

Participants: Erhard Busek (Institute for the Danube Region and Central Europe, Vienna), HE Michèle Boccoz (the French Ambassador to Croatia), Vesna Pusic (Former First Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign and European Affairs of Croatia), Shalini Randeria (Institute for Human Sciences, Vienna), Wolfgang Merkel (WZB Berlin Social Science Center), Ugo Mattei (IUC College University of Torino, Hastings College of the Law University of California), Luc Lévy (French Institute Zagreb), Vedran Dzihic (CAS SEE, University of Rijeka)

May 27, 2016 / Day 1

Conference Venue: Faculty for Humanities, Sveučilišna avenija 4, 51000 Rijeka, Amphitheaters 230, 106, 107


09.15-10.00 Ceremonial signing: Memorandum of Understanding – CAS SEE / Institute of Higher Education, University of Georgia (University of Rijeka, Rectorate, Trg Brace Mazuranica 10


08.30-09.00    Registration (desk in front of the Amphitheater 230, Faculty for Humanities)

09.00-09.30    Introductory: Petar Bojanic (CAS SEE/IFDT), Mario Gioannini (Collegio Carlo Alberto)

09.30-11.15    Plenary Presentations – Amphitheater 230

Chair: Nenad Miscevic (University of Maribor)

RAIMO TUOMELA (University of Helsinki): “Social Institutions, Constitution, and Institutional Status”

FRANCESCO GUALA (University of Milan): “A Functionalist Approach to Institutions”

Chair: Snjezana Prijic-Samarzija

SHEILA SLAUGHTER (IHE University of Georgia): Higher education, Stratification, and workforce development: Competitive advantage in Europe, the USand Canada

11.15-11.30    Coffee break – Faculty for Humanities (desk in front of the Amphitheater 230)


11.30-13.00    Session I with III Panels:

The Legal Nature And Identity Of Institutions: Luka Burazin (Zagreb Faculty of Law); Tiziana Andina (University of Turin); Ana Dimiskovska (University of Skopje); Boran Bercic (University of Rijeka)

Higher Education Initiative Southeaster Europe: Cas See / Institute Of Higher Education, University Of Georgia: Ed Simpson (IHE University of Georgia); Zoran Sušanj (Faculty for Humanities and Social Sciences, Rijeka); Libby Morris (IHE University of Georgia); Lucia Brajkovic (American Council on Education)

The Role Of Institutions Case Studies: Vedran Obućina (Society for Mediterranean Studies, University of Rijeka); Katerina Shapkova, Pece Nedanovski (Ss. Cyril and Methodius University in Skopje); Lina Dokuzović (European Institute for Progressive Cultural Policies, Vienna)

13.00-14.30    Lunch – Akvarij at the University Campus, Radmile Matejčić 5, Rijeka


14.30-16.15    Plenary Presentations – Amphitheater 230

Chair: Igor Stiks (Edinburgh College of Art, The University of Edinburgh)

UGO MATTEI (University of Torino, IUC, College University of California, Hastings College of the Law): “New Institutions of the Commons”

AVNER DE SHALIT (University of Tel Aviv): “Bring Back the Parties”


16.15-17.45    Session II with III Panels:

Playing By The Rules: Brian Epstein (Tufts University, via skype); Nenad Miscevic (University of Maribor); Bojan Borstner (University of Maribor); Edoardo Fregonese (Labont|Arch, University of Turin); Mark Losonc (IFDT)

Hospitality Of State Institutions: Dane Taleski (CAS SEE Fellow); Aleksandra Zdeb (Faculty of International and Political Studies, Jagiellonian University in Kraków); Ali Emre Benli (CAS SEE Fellow)

Vladimir Unkovski Korica (CAS SEE Fellow)

Institutionalizing Studies Of Social Engagement 1: Marjan Ivkovic (IFDT); Srdjan Prodanovic (IFDT); Jelena Vasiljevic (IFDT); Aleksandar Matkovic (IFDT);Edward Djordjevic (CELAP)

17.45-18.00    Coffee break – Faculty for Humanities (desk in front of the Amphitheater 230)


19.00-20.30    Round table – Amphitheater 230

 “Institution-building and Institution-Managing – Between Idealist Goals, Structural Constrains and Permanent Fundraising”

Introductory: Vedran Džihić (CAS SEE)

Hedvig Morvai, Shalini Randeria, Erhard Busek, Mario Gioannini, Libby Morris, Haki Abazi

May 28, 2016 / Day 2

Conference Venue: Faculty for Humanities, Sveučilišna avenija 4, 51000 Rijeka, Amphitheaters 230, 232, 206


8.30-10.00      CAS SEE Boards Meeting, Hotel Jadran


10.30-12.15    Plenary Presentations – Amphitheater 230

Chair: Tiziana Andina (LabOnt, University of Torino)

MAURIZIO FERRARIS (LabOnt, University of Torino): “DOCUMEDIALITY: Documentality-Intentionality-Institution”

ROBERT SALAIS (Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan, Paris Centre Marc Bloch): “From Conventions to Institutions. The Contours of a Pragmatic Theory of Institutions”


12.15-13.45    Session III with III Panels:

Panel 1 Amphitheater 230

Caring Ethics And Institutions: Ivan Vukovic (University of Belgrade); Elvio Baccarini (University of Rijeka); Viktor Ivanković, Zlata Božac (Central European University, Budapest); Nebojsa Zelic (University of Rijeka)

Institutionalizing Studies Of Social Engagement 2: Srdjan Prodanovic (IFDT); Adriana Zaharijevic (IFDT); Gazela Pudar Drasko (IFDT); Igor Krtolica (IFDT); Zeljko Radinkovic (IFDT)

Guaranteeing Equality: Edward Djordjevic (CELAP); Igor Cvejic (IFDT) Alfredo Sasso (CAS; SEE Fellow);  Sandra Bradvić (Institute of Art History, University of Bern); Mate Nikola Tokic (CAS SEE Felow)

13.45-15.15    Lunch – Bar FUSION at the University Campus, Slavka Krautzeka 83A/II, Rijeka


15.15-17.00    Plenary Presentations – Amphitheater 230

Chair: Nebojsa Zelic (University of Rijeka)

JONATHAN WOLFF (University College London): “Institutional Change and Agents of Justice”

EMMANUEL PICAVET (University Paris 1 Sorbonne): “Ways of compromise-building in a world of institutions”

Chair: Jonathan Wolff (University College London)

THOMAS SCANLON (Harvard University – via skype): “Individual Morality and the Morality of Institutions”

17.00-17.15    Coffee break – Faculty for Humanities (desk in front of the Amphitheater 230)


17.15-18.45    Session IV with III Panels:

Institutions And Democracy: Igor Stiks (Edinburgh College of Art, The University of Edinburgh); Rastislav Dinić (Faculty of Philosophy, Niš); Cristina Matiuta (Department of Political Science and Communication Sciences, University of Oradea); Radoš Vidaković (University of Vienna, Austria)

Seminar on the philosophy of social institutions with Prof. Raimo Tuomela – Contemporaneity And Philosophy – Philosophy PhD Program, UNIRI: Raimo Tuomela (University of Helsinki); Marko-Luka Zubčić (Faculty for Humanities, University of Rijeka); David Grčki (Faculty for Humanities, University of Rijeka); Renato Stanković (Faculty for Humanities, University of Rijeka); Leonard Pektor (Faculty for Humanities, University of Rijeka); Denis Paušić (Faculty for Humanities, University of Rijeka)

Institution And Borders: Gazela Pudar Drasko; Stefan Aleksić (University of Belgrade); Nuri Ali Tahir (CAS SEE Fellow); Tamara Petrović Trifunović and Dunja Poleti (Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade); Michal Sládeček (Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, Belgrade)

CAS-SEE Fellows Panel in Belgrade

CAS-SEE Fellows presented at the “Social Justice: New Perspectives, New Horizons” Conference in Belgrade (May, 4-6 2016).

Chair: Sanja Milutinović Bojanić

Dane Taleski, Dragan Tevdovski, Trajche Panov and Viktor Dimovski

Socially Impoverish and Entrap: A Strategy to Maintain a Hybrid Regime?

Some theories of democratization argue that quality of democracy and social equality are interrelated. The argument is that if the quality of democracy is higher, then inequalities will be lower because  redistribution in a democratic regime is more fair. Another argument is that if inequalities are higher, then this will increase social pressures for regime change. The idea is that people will revolt to improve their situation. The expected causal mechanism at work is that as people’s living condition worsen they will demand more democracy which, among other things, will deliver better redistribution. Why are then hybrid regimes maintained, if inequality is on the rise?

To answer the question we assume a nested research design. We first make a cross-country comparison and then we present an in-dept case study. In the cross-country comparison, we take countries in transition from East Central Europe, Southeastern Europe and Commonwealth of Independent State and Russia. We measure quality of democracy using the Freedom House Nations in Transit Report from 2005 to 2015. To measure inequality we use World Bank Data for GINI coefficients and unemployment rates. The data seems to support the assumption that if the quality of democracy is higher, then inequality is lower. However, we then take a closer look at Macedonia, a case where inequality dramatically increased, but quality of democracy did not improve. In other words, Macedonia is a case where a sharp rise of inequality was accompanied with degradation of democracy.

The country introduced tax cuts which contributed toward the rise of inequality and poverty. At the same time, the government enacted policies to target benefits to different groups in society. However, the policies did not off-set the rise of inequality and poverty, but made the people more dependent on state patronage. We trace policy development and budget spending to show how policies were designed to target small portions of benefits to different groups in society, not to adjust for inequalities, but to make the people more dependent on social benefits. While democracy was deteriorating, the citizens were entrap. The outcome of the elaborate policy design was to gradually increase the serfdom of majority of the population from the elites.

Dragan Tevdovski, PhD, is an Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Economics, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University in Skopje.

Trajche Panov is a Doctoral Candidate at the European University Institute in Florence, and lecturer at the James Madison University.

Dane Taleski, PhD, is a Fellow at Centre for Advanced Studies in Southeast Europe, University of Rijeka, and Visiting Fellow at the Centre for Southeast European Studies, University of Graz.


Ali Emre Benli

Theorizing Justice in Asylum Here and Now: A Social Choice Approach

Mainstream theorizing of justice in asylum provides guidance in addressing actual questions by first theorizing ideal principles that govern a perfectly just refugee regime and then deriving recommendation based on ideal principles. In this presentation, I first point out that mainstream theorizing is insufficient in addressing urgent and important questions such as the current situation of asylum seekers arriving at the borders of the European Union. The difficulty lies with finding an agreement on the superior principles of justice in asylum as well as regimes that may best implement them. Moreover, in the context of such disagreement, it is hard to create the political will required for their implementation. Then, I offer an alternative method based on Amartya Sen’s work on social choice approach to theorizing justice. I argue that we can reach partial agreements regarding the particular question at hand without reaching an overall agreement on the perfectly just refugee regime. The partial agreements point to ways to improve the status quo. In addition they give us sufficient moral reason not only for choosing one alternative course of action over the others, but also for demanding that others do the same.


Vladimir Unkovski-Korica

City Partnerships as Détente from Below? Twinning Bologna and Zagreb

This talk discusses a project, a work in progress, jointly developed by Dr Eloisa Betti and Dr Vladimir Unkovski-Korica, about the twinning of Bologna and Zagreb in the Cold War. Town twinning in the interwar period of the twentieth century developed as a civic notion to promote peace and a common identity in Europe, especially in France and Germany. This paper looks at a similar attempt to create links between Italian and Yugoslav cities, following the Second World War and territorial disputes following it. Nonetheless, it also argues that Cold War questions differentiated twinning from the interwar experiment. The talk therefore interrogates to what extent the links set up between Bologna and Zagreb can be seen as an early form of détente as various actors responded to the logic of a bipolar world. It also asks whether the hope of ‘détente from below’ was in fact utopian in the context of international economic inequalities, and therefore a harbinger of what we now know as globalisation.


Nuri Ali Tahir

Fighting Injustice Through Health Care Reform: How to Understand Social Injustice and Recent Reforms in American Health Care System

Social injustice and its components are being discussed more often today where state authorities are having trouble to provide equal and fair access to the citizens for certain services. In countries where there are political actors that resist to some regulations fighting injustice, the case might lead to political polarization and eventually defend the status-quo in which injustice prevails.  Recently, with its limited accesss and high costs, US health care system became the most important topic in the American public policy. Problematic access to health care services and the lack of universal health insurance resulted with almost 50 million people having unpaid bills to the hospitals. Democrats and Republicans had huge debate regarding the Affordable Health Care Act which is also known as Obama Care. While Democrats defended state subsidy to help poor people, Republicans strictly opposed this policy and government aid to help defray health insurance costs. The sutation becomes even more complex if we include other people such as legal residents and immigrant communities. This paper will focus on the chronic problems of American health care system and its accessibility by the poor people. Democrat and Republican positions will be evaluated based on their view towards equal access to the health care services by the citizens and other immigrant communities.

JÖRG H. GLEITER in conversation with CAS SEE Fellows

 Architecture and Anthropocene

On the occasion of Prof. Gleiter’s visit to Rijeka, on 21st February, 2016, and after assisting at his lecture the previous day, CAS SEE Fellows had the opportunity to engage in a rather controversial discussion on Anthropocene, or more precisely, conceptual and epistemological issues of anthropogenic transformations of the earth’s land, oceans, biosphere and climate. Would it be possible to thematize the paradigm, which the chemist Paul Crutzen labeled as the Anthropocene, not only and exclusively by geologists, climatologists or physicists, to mention only a small range of researchers of scientific backgrounds, but also by philosophers, historians, sociologists, and legal scholars?

How the Humanities are responding to the huge and important shift grasping, conceptualizing and objectifying an era of human activity which is slowly lacking the human scale of things?