Call for papers

Call for Papers: “Rules without Words: Inquiries into Non-linguistic Normativities”

Special Issue of the journal Phenomenology and Mind

Deadline for paper submission: March 13th, 2019
The issue will be published by December 2019

Call for Papers:

In the common thinking, rules are often considered linguistic entities. However, forms of normativity not necessarily connected with verbal or written language emerge in the social reality. A number of normative phenomena (e.g. folk law, customs, pictorial law, graphic rules, hostile architecture, animal societies) widely described in the literature do not seem to involve the use of words. Indeed, apparently, in these cases, rules have non-lexical nature.

Phenomenology and Mind invites submissions for a special issue dedicated to “Rules without Words: Inquiries into Non-linguistic Normativities”. This special issue aims to bring together researchers from all around the world who focus on non-linguistic rules from different philosophical perspectives: social philosophy, philosophy of law and jurisprudence, epistemology, political philosophy, philosophy of language, media studies, philosophy of architecture, philosophy of design, performance studies, ethology, cognitive science and social psychology, gender studies.

The main purpose of this special issue is to provide a critical overview of some of the most

interesting topics and methodologies from the current philosophical debate, focusing on (but not limited to) the following issues:

  1. Ontology of non-linguistic rules
  • What are the distinctive ontological features of non-linguistic rules?
  • What are the relations between non-linguistic rules and social reality?
  • Are non-linguistic rules essentially connected to human societies or do they regulate the social life of some non-human members of the animal kingdom?
  1. Epistemology of non-linguistic rules
  • What are the distinctive epistemic features of non-linguistic rules?
  • What are the cognitive and psychological aspects of non-linguistic rules?
  • How is it possible to understand a non-linguistic rule?
  • Is it possible to have a normative experience independently from language?
  1. Deontology of non-linguistic rules
  • Do non-linguistic rules contribute to the development or the maintenance of traditional and new social inequalities?
  • What are the seminal cases of non-linguistic rules in disseminating or imposing political and social values and habits?
  • How can non-linguistic rules promote the social good?
  • How do architecture and design shape social reality through the creation of tacit normative social constraints?

Phenomenology and Mind is the Journal of the Faculty of Philosophy of San Raffaele University (Milan). It was founded in 2011 and since then has hosted works of outstanding philosophers such as Lynne Baker, Thomas Fuchs, Anna Elisabetta Galeotti, Shaun Gallagher, Margaret Gilbert, Jürgen Habermas, Edward Harcourt, Robin Jeshion, Dieter Lohmar, Michael Pauen, John Searle, Nadia Urbinati, and many others. The journal is anonymously peer-reviewed and open-access. We are committed to publishing papers of high academic quality and making them accessible to a wide audience. Submissions from underrepresented groups in philosophy are particularly encouraged.

Confirmed Invited Authors:

Amedeo Giovanni Conte (University of Pavia)

Giuseppe Lorini (University of Cagliari)

Patrick Maynard (University of Western Ontario)

Valeria Bucchetti and Francesca Casnati (Politecnico di Milano, Design Department)

Guest Editors:

Sanja Bojanić (University of Rijeka, Academy of Applied Arts Rijeka, Center for Advanced Studies – Southeastern Europe)

Olimpia Loddo (University of Cagliari)

Marko-Luka Zubčić (University of Rijeka, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences Rijeka, Center for Advanced Studies – Southeastern Europe)

Submission Guidelines

Submissions must be prepared for double blind review. Manuscripts – in .doc format – should not contain any identifying information and they cannot exceed 6000 words (references included). Moreover, they must contain:

– An abstract of no more than 150 words,

– The section to which the author(s) wants to contribute to;

– 4/5 keywords.

All manuscripts must be in English.

For stylistic details, see: http://www.fupress.net/public/journals/60/pam_guidelines.pdf;

Submissions should be sent via the Phenomenology and Mind website

(http://www.fupress.net/index.php/pam) by the 13th of March, 2019.

The author should register here and then log in to submit her paper. Please, be sure to register as author in order to submit your paper (flag the option “Author” in your Profile), and to indicate your current affiliation (if applicable).

For information, please contact: phenomenologyandmind@unisr.it

Important dates:

Deadline for submissions: March 13th, 2019 

Notification of acceptance: May 13th, 2019

Publication of the issue: December, 2019

Call for papers: Croatian International Relations Review (CIRR)

Special issue on ‘European Union and Challenges of Cultural Policies: Critical Perspectives’

Guest editors: Jaka Primorac, Aleksandra Uzelac and Paško Bilić, Department for Culture and Communication, Institute for Development and International Relations (IRMO), Zagreb, Croatia

Vol. 24 No. 83 (2018)

The Croatian International Relations Review (CIRR) now accepts contributions for its special thematic issue with the provisional title ‘European Union and Challenges of Cultural Policies: Critical Perspectives’ that will focus on the systematic and critical reflections on the impact of the European Union on the national level policies that are framing the cultural field, shedding light on the challenges of implementing cultural policies, as well as, on the challenges of creating and thinking about new cultural policies. CIRR (ISSN 1848-5782) published by the Institute for Development and International Relations, is a peer-reviewed journal in the social sciences that is indexed by Scopus – Elsevier and over 30 other services.

Description and scope

The world in which we live is changing rapidly and hence, local and global levels are no longer easily separated. In the 21st century, cultural policies have to deal with a (post) globalisation context that is marked by cultural, social and economic transformations; issues of rapid technological change and digital shift driven mostly by economic interests, market concentration and the dominance of global corporations; mobility and migration movements; rapid urbanisation; social and financial instability, etc. All this has an impact on the conditions under which the cultural sector operates today.

In the context of EU politics, culture has increasingly been used as an instrument for different social, political or economic objectives. EU international relations are increasingly becoming intercultural, while the concept of culture as public value is weakening in comparison to its commodity value. The crisis in Europe and of the European model has implications for the cultural field as well; today’s Europe needs to reimagine itself – its aims, values and identities – and needs to find an adequate model for its sustainable cultural development. Due to the subsidiarity principle engrained in the Lisbon Treaty, the European Union has not been involved in formulating an explicit common cultural policy. Nevertheless, the EU has been indirectly contributing to the creation of common cultural policy frameworks through its soft cultural policy instruments and mechanisms that represent a de facto policy approach to the various cultural policy issues and their related instruments (e.g. Open Method of Coordination – OMC, the Creative Europe programme, the European Capitals of Culture (ECOC) as the EU cultural programme initiatives and other similar mechanisms). The EU has been also contributing through other explicit policies that affect the field of culture (e.g. through the strategy on the Digital  Single Market (DSM)  and  other  similar  strategies). It is questionable whether  such an approach is still adequate for today’s cultural and social challenges, and whether national level cultural policies can tackle complex global problems, especially in the context where many other public policies are increasingly influencing the field of culture.

The Special Issue on ‘European Union and Challenges of Cultural Policies: Critical Perspectives’ calls for contributions that critically address the different issues and challenges that the EU and national cultural policies are facing in the 21st  century, including, but not limited to:

EU and cultural policy issues: What are the limits of subsidiarity?

What are the impacts of EU soft policy mechanisms on national contexts (OMC, Structured Dialogue, Creative Europe, European Capital of Culture)?

How to contextualise explicit and implicit cultural policies in the context of transversality and convergence of policies?

What is the role of civil society and networks in formulating cultural policies?

Who are the new actors in intersectoral connection (culture, education, science, ICT)

The role of culture in EU international relations – what are the benefits for the cultural sector?

What are the implications of digital shift to sustainable culture of the future?

What is the role of the strategy of the Digital Single Market for sustainable digital cultural resources?

Media and communication policy issues: What is the place of media freedom and media pluralism?

How to tackle socio-cultural inequalities in Europe from the cultural policy perspective?

Innovative cultural policies: what new models are there for achieving sustainability in cultural development?

What new theoretical perspectives on cultural policy can be used?

We welcome articles that develop theoretical arguments or offer strong empirical evidence as either comparative or single-case studies.

Submission and Important dates

We welcome original articles written in English up to 8000 words in length (including footnotes and an abstract of 150 words, and excluding the bibliography). All selected articles are subject to double-blind refereeing by at least two reviewers. Please consult the Instructions for authors before submitting your contributions.

Articles should be sent to cirr@irmo.hr with the subject line stating ‘Article submission for the Special Issue on ‘European Union and Challenges of Cultural Policies: Critical Perspectives’.

Article submission deadline: November 12th, 2017 First round of notifications: February 2nd, 2018 Revised papers due: March 6th, 2018

Further reviews and acceptance: April 17th, 2018 Expected publication date: June, 2018

Please find the full Call for for papers at the following link.

 

Call for papers – John Searle Symposium

19th Edition of the International Conference
Contemporary Philosophical Issues

Place:  University of Rijeka, Croatia

Organizers:  Department of Philosophy, Faculty for Humanities and Social Sciences; Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe, University of Rijeka; Croatian Society for Analytic Philosophy; PhD programme “Contemporaneity and philosophy”, LabOnt, University of Torino; Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade

Date: May 22-23, 2017

Deadline for applications: April 30, 2017

We cordially invite you to the 19th conference Contemporary Philosophical Issues: John Searle Symposium on Social Ontology.

The annual conference is this year dedicated to philosopher John Searle, whose influence on and relevance for the contemporary analytic philosophy, cognitive sciences and neurobiology can hardly be overestimated. Professor Searle’s work in philosophy of language, philosophy of mind, metaphysics and epistemology set foundations for many of the most discussed issues in these fields, and his renditions of problems as diverse as consciousness, intentionality, meaning, free will, artificial intelligence, reality, social reality, human rights, institutions and power, provided new directions for philosophers and scientists alike. In his books, Seeing Things as They Are: A Theory of Perception and Making the Social World: The Structure of Human Civilization, as well as in his work at the recently founded The John Searle Center for Social Ontology, Professor Searle focuses on themes in social sciences, which is why our focus at the conference will be on social ontology. However, we appreciate papers on all and every aspect of John Searle’s rich philosophical oeuvre.

Confirmed participants:

In addition to John Searle, our guests will be Jennifer Hudin, Director of the John Searle Center for Social Ontology, Maurizio Ferraris, LabOnt University of Torino, Tiziana Andina, Director of LabOnt University of Torino, Paolo de Lucia, University of Milano, Giuseppe Lorini, University of Cagliari, Nenad Miščević, University of Maribor, Boran Berčić, University of Rijeka, Snježana Prijić-Samaržija, University of Rijeka, Petar Bojanić, Universities of Belgrade and Rijeka

Abstract submission and deadline:

If you are interested in participating, please send a title of your paper and a short abstract of maximum 400 words by April 30th 2017 to Iris Vidmar (ividmar@ffri.hr) and Andrea Mešanović (andrea.mesanovic@gmail.com). Notifications regarding the acceptance will be issued by May 1st 2017.

Please note that our conference allows for the possibility of presentation of papers concerned with contemporary themes in analytic philosophy that do not address Professor Searle’s opus directly. These presentations will be organized as a parallel session of the conference, which, in case of a large number of applicants, can extend to May 24th. Ideally, we designate 30 minutes for presentations of papers, followed by 15 minutes for discussions.

There will be no registration fee. Conference organizers will provide lunch and light refreshments during the conference program. Participants are kindly requested to make their own accommodation and travel arrangements.

Organizational Committee:

Andrea Mešanović

Iris Vidmar

Luca Malatesti

Gazela Pudar Drasko

Nenad Smokrović

Snježana Prijić-Samaržija

Sanja Bojanić

Vera Tripodi