Bosnia-Herzegovina

GIULIA CARABELLI

The Ties That (un)Bind: Affect and Organisation in the Bosnia-Herzegovina Protests, 2014

“In this lecture, I will discuss the results of my research on the 2014 mass protests in Bosnia Herzegovina. Overall, I am interested in accounting for the production and articulation of these spaces of rebellion by considering their ‘affective atmospheres’, which means that I am curious about the effects that affect have in the production of socio-spatial relations. In particular, I look at rage, anger, but especially hope as a means to understand how spaces of “togetherness” came to be created during the protests in a country where both “being together” and “occupying public spaces” represent major political and social issues in their own right. I will discuss the extent to which becoming hopeful is also a reason for disappointment, discontent and for the creation of fractures within the movement.

Overall, my goal is to discuss the potential of looking at affects such as hope to account for and explore grassroots protests and radical political movements: how they come into being, how they become movements for creating new spaces of togetherness, but also divisions and fractures; to create and sustain, but also destroy infrastructures of togetherness. Hope begins from encounters and it brings about the question of how new possibilities can be born from these encounters, which involve multiple processes of mediation, negotiation, explanation. And yet, these sites of hope, such as the protests in Bosnia, are the potential signposts that an alternative exists. As Helena Flam argues, we should pay attention to the ways in which protest movements attempt to re-socialise people through (subversive) emotions in order to show that to be angry and to voice concerns is fair and legitimate.”

– Giulia Carabelli

Workshop “Generation on the move Children of the 90s in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia, Kosovo, and Serbia”

Workshop Program: Generation On The Move
Description:

The 1990s had a long lasting impact on the children and youth of Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia, Kosovo, and Serbia, that can be seen nearly a quarter of a century after the outbreak of the Yugoslav wars. The experiences as well as the social and political view points of this generation will become the foundation of their roles performed in society and guide their decision-making process. Therefore research studies about the children from the last decade of the former-Yugoslavia will be an important task due to their effect on actual and prospective politics in this region. The aim of the workshop is to get a broad idea of the generation that lived their childhood and youth through the Yugoslav wars in the 1990s. Having now reached adulthood, the question of how this generation deals with their past, present and their future is raised. Though the organizers of the workshop focus on interdisciplinary studies, the essential target is to collect a variety of different approaches towards the generation’s identities, memories, attitudes and values, hopes and needs. We are investigating the generation’s opinions and habitus in terms of their individual and collective political, socio-economical and cultural situations, as well as towards Europe, the European Union and their neighbouring countries.

Organized by Franz Vranitzky Chair for European Studies, Vienna; Sigmund Freud University Vienna, Berlin, Paris; Center for Advanced Studies of Southeastern Europe and partners;  Organization team: MMag. Eva Tamara Asboth, Mag. Christina Krakovsky and Andrea Mesanovic (CAS UNIRI)

In Cooperation with: Vienna Society for European Studies; Funded by: Erste Foundation, Vienna

Workshop venue: Center for Advanced Studies of Southeastern Europe (CAS SEE), University of Rijeka

Program: Generation On The Move Schedule final