Sanja

CAS SEE Fellowship application: Spring-Autumn 2017

 

Following the implementation of the previous fourth generations of CAS SEE Fellows starting in 2014-15, 2015-2016 and 2016-2017, CAS SEE is announcing a new annual call for Fellowships for Spring and Autumn 2017. This call is organized along selected thematic foci (see bellow) but also offers the possibility of open applications. The CAS SEE Fellowship Program for Spring and Autumn 2017 will host 12 junior fellows. The Call for Applications  closes on January 22nd, 2017.

The fifth generation of fellows will assume their positions by March 1st 2017 (from March 1st to July 31st).

The sixth generation of fellows will assume their positions by October 1st, 2017 (from October 1st 2017 to February 28th 2018).

Inspired by the excellent cooperation of the previous generations of CAS Fellows and their cooperative work that has created thematic synergies within smaller working groups among the fellows CAS SEE Fellowship, Spring and Autumn 2017 will stimulate the building of smaller groups of Fellows working on similar topics (or different aspects of one particular topic). The Fellows will present their work on a bi-weekly basis in Rijeka or other regional centers and will engage more intensively in research in the wider region of South East Europe. All Fellows will spend first two weeks of the Fellowship at CAS SEE premises in Rijeka. One part of the Fellows will then according to their research interests be enabled to spend the rest of the Fellowship in the region, while attending the regular CAS SEE regional conferences and seminars. By implementing such a flexible regional approach while maintaining the spirit of CAS SEE Collegium, the Fellows will be able to create new synergies within the Collegium as well as to pursue their research within wide networks of other scholars and partner institutions in the region perfectly designed to enrich their work.

This Call for Fellows is inviting applicants to focus on two particular topics:

Making Inclusive Cities: Towards Participatory Governance Practices

Cities face various economic and social challenges. Since they present a major site of contemporary transformations, cities have become the main arena for detecting and exploring emerging trends of rearrangements and resetting of systems. Over the last few decades, the responsibilities of the cities for the creation of community life have increased, as well as the mobility of population and complexity of governance structures. In order to create or sustain urban ecosystem of plurality and cultural diversity, many local cultural operators and planners experiment with new participatory models of building integrated and cohesive urban communities. Answering traditional governance failures by implementing participatory and collaborative governance practices opens new avenues and possibilities for social inclusion and collective action sensitive to local issues. Although these practices heavily depend on the local context, many interpretations, versions and forms of participatory governance in culture have emerged; the common goal of most of participatory models is bringing together public, private and civil stakeholders in the participatory decision-making process and collective action.

We invite scholars in social sciences and humanities whose research interests are related to the topic, particularly to participatory governance in cultural sector, to submit proposals addressing one or any combination of the following issues:

  • decentralization and urbanization of cultural policies
  • community development
  • cultural democracy
  • cultural sustainability
  • inclusive urban and cultural planning
  • cultural governance
  • policy rhetoric and policy change
  • theoretical models and discourses of participation and collaboration in culture
  • practical operations of the participatory governance in culture in making inclusive cities
  • organizational and institutional innovations
  • civil society advocacy coalitions for inclusive cities
  • multi-level governance and grass-root initiatives for participatory policy-making

Critical Theory:

Critical theory has always been rife with tensions. In both its narrow and broad meaning it has always been meandering between being a theory with a powerful appeal for social change and a distinct philosophical approach aiming at developing methods, theories, and forms of explanation from standard understandings in both the natural and the social sciences. Against this background few relevant questions have to be asked: How relevant is Critical theory today? How strong is its appeal and theoretical impact? Who are the agents of new thinking along the path of Critical theory?

Horkheimers’ normative quest for a transformation of a capitalist to a more democratic society with human beings in control of all conditions of social life and with consensus at the core of a society is of high pertinence today. How to think and conceptualize the necessary transformation of the neoliberal capitalist society into a „real democracy“ where the life is „livable“ (Butler) again, presents one of the biggest challenges for Critical theory today. To put it as a question: How is the opposition against the neoliberal hegemony conceptualized from the standpoint of critical theory? What could be the answer of today’s Critical theory to the overwhelming sense of crisis and despair both in Europa and in the USA? How to reconcile the social problems deriving from the neoliberal concept of economics and society with democracy, freedom, fundamental rights, and social justice? Is the way of “democratic polarization” (Habermas) and radical democracy (Mouffe) a possible path for revitalizing the practical and normative potential of Critical theory?

If Critical theory, beyond its normative and explanatory potential, also includes a practical aspect, the question of performativity of Critical theory today comes to the fore. Can we argue that new forms of resistance in form of activism and social movements, new forms of „performative public assemblies“ (Butler) represent critical societal cells able to re-think and re-conceptualize some old premises of Critical theory and thus contribute to a new democratic and socially just normativity beyond neoliberalism?

We invite scholars in social sciences and humanities whose research interests are related to the topic to submit proposals addressing one or any combination of the following issues:

  • the relevance and social impact of contemporary critical theory
  • neoliberal challenges and critical theory
  • critical theory and the contemporary social and political crisis
  • democratic polarization and radical democracy
  • post-truth politics
  • social movements, performative public assemblies and participative democracy
  • critical theory, inequalities and culture
  • critical theory and gender
  • neoliberalism and privatisation of cities’ public spaces
Further information and details about the application procedure: FELLOWSHIP APPLICATION 2016-2017

COURSE / PHILOSOPHY AND ARCHITECTURE

Course description:

The course includes perspectives of social and political philosophers and architects on the issue of social inequality in cities and intimately related issues such as people’s quality of life and wellbeing. The assumed notion of cities contains an institutional component (a jurisdiction issue), a spatial component (an architectural issue of housing, density of buildings and citizens, a continuous district of settlement), and a cultural component (a particular state of mind which we call “Civicism”). The main aim of the course is to discuss a proposed model of measuring inequality in European cities (as distinguished from states), and then to suggest principles for policies meant to reduce urban inequality in cities in which the majority of people reside, and some of which enjoy budgets larger than most countries’ budgets. At the course the lecturers will argue for bottom-up moral and political reasoning that avoids both full paternalism and full populism while combining objective and subjective approaches. We will discuss the view that philosophy and architecture should begin with understanding the challenges to policy makers and architects (as creators of the cities) from which they should derive to develop and offer the models for improving the general quality of life. Special accent will be put on the developing the Dynamic Public Reflective Equilibrium as the optimal research methodology aimed to reduce political, economic, gender and other forms of inequalities in the city.

* ECTS points available for MA and PhD students. The requirements for ECTS credits are (i) participation on at least 80% of lectures, (ii) presentation of the original paper on the topic of the course/discussion papers on the papers provided by lecturers

Course lecturers:

Avner de Shalit /Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Jonatan Wolff / University College London

Snjezana Prijic Samarzija / CAS SEE – University of Rijeka

Petar Bojanic / CAS SEE – University of Rijeka, University of Belgrade

Vladan Djokic / University of Belgrade

Idis Turato / University of Zagreb

Sandra Meireis / Institute for Architecture –Technical University Berlin

Zoran Lazović / University of Belgrade

Course directors:

Avner de Shalit (Hebrew University of Jerusalem), Jonatan Wolff (University College London), Snjezana Prijic Samarzija (CAS SEE – University of Rijeka), Petar Bojanic (CAS SEE – University of Rijeka University of Belgrade), Joerg Glitter (Technical University of Berlin) Vladan Djokic (University of Belgrade)

Course Program

Course_Participants

Course instructions for students

Call for Application: Rijeka Summer School – RETHINKING DIVERSITY POLITICS IN EUROPE

12-18 September, 2016, Rijeka (Croatia)

organized by CAS SEE, UNIRI in cooperation with Center for Women’s Studies, University of Rijeka,  Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade, University Paris 8, Vincennes-St Denis

This summer school should provide space for recasting frameworks of “diversity politics” and “diversity discourses” in Europe. In light of recent events, we would like to challenge the crisis of multiculturalism and core European values of solidarity and human rights. The “failure of multiculturalism” narrative has become all too present in Europe, shifting the rhetoric to cultural anxieties and articulating immigration as a national threat. This discourse has also affected “internal immigration”, making certain groups throughout Europe less visible and more vulnerable: Roma, refugees and internally displaced persons, certain LGBTQ communities. Moreover, ethnicity, nationality, religion and race are being forcefully reshuffled, inviting contemporary forces of nationalism and securitization. Hereby, we are particularly interested to the effects of the ways how European countries ‘manage’ diversity through its policies and practices: from ethnic and racial to socio-economic diversity, but also particularly to citizenship and migration status diversity. It is of crucial interest to map and evidence differences among significantly varying Western European practices (France, UK, Germany etc.), Central European practices (former communist countries with strong opposition to multiculturalism) and South-Eastern European practices in countries where migration is observed as passing-by phenomenon.

The lectures and seminars of this summer school particularly investigate how these three identified regions policies connected to governmentality of diversity are changing after the recent and actual conflicts and migration flows. The summer school will particularly focus on policies and practices that affect marginalized and vulnerable groups in these regions.

The summer school main goal is to highlight the agency of these marginalized groups in order to understand, how they themselves respond to reconfigurations of diversity politics and practices.

THEMES:

  • Post-socialist transition and governmentality of diversity
  • Transforming racial thinking from a biological issue into “social questions”
  • Gender instrumentalisation in the refugee crisis
  • Universalism vs. Differentialism: Leading to the same politics?
  • EU integration processes and (re)construction of vulnerable groups, with a special focus on Roma
  • Refugee crisis and the Western Balkan Route: The shifting signifier of the marginalized
  • Is the subaltern silent?: the agency of marginalized groups
  • Art and politics of difference
  • Freedom of expression and hate speech in today’s diversified Europe
  • Troubled memory and feminist politics

KEYNOTE PARTICIPANTS:

  • Athena Athanasiou, Panteion University of Social and Political Sciences, Athens
  • Ethel Brooks, Rutgers University TBC
  • Eric Fassin, University Paris 8, Vincennes-St Denis
  • Julija Sardelic, School of Law and Social Justice, University of Liverpool
  • Jörg Schulte, Institute of Slavonic Studies, University of Cologne
  • Elena Tzelepis, Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities, University of London
  • Violetta Zentai, Central European University, Budapest

ELIGIBILITY

  • Applicants should be postdoc and post/graduate students (MA or PhD students) and/or younger researchers interested in exploring the issues of migration, Roma and minority studies, gender, cultural studies, political sciences and related areas. However, outstanding BA students are also considered and have the chance to enroll. We also welcome the applications from the civil society activists bringing particular insights to the school’s content.
  • Applicants from all countries are eligible to apply, but we particularly welcome those coming from SEE.

APPLICATION

  • All applicants should send their CV and one-page motivation letter to cas@cas.uniri.hr before 1st August 2016.
  • Paper abstract is optional. If you wish to deliver a presentation, post your abstract in 500 words max. for a presentation not exceeding 15 mins.
  • Maximum number of participants: 50
  • Maximum number of students delivering presentation: 20 (maximum 4 presentations per afternoon session).
  • Participation fee is 100 EUR but it doesn’t cover accommodation expenses.

Participants will receive a certificate of participation describing the activities in which they have participated during the summer school.

INFORMATION

Organizers will facilitate arranging accommodation in the student dormitory of the University of Rijeka for those who want to stay there and we kindly ask participants to emphasize if they opt for this option in their application.

Alternatively, it is possible to book rooms in one of Rijeka’s hostels:

http://www.visitrijeka.eu/Where_To_Stay/Hostels_and_Hostelry

or hotels:

http://www.visitrijeka.eu/Where_To_Stay/Hotels

or private accommodation:

http://www.visitrijeka.eu/Where_To_Stay/Private_Accommodation

It is possible to find useful information about the town at: http://www.visitrijeka.eu/

If any further details are needed, please contact cas@cas.uniri.hr

On CAS SEE Summer School Series

The general aim of the CAS SEE Summer School Series is to gather young post-graduate students, scholars and teaching staff from Europe, focusing on South East European countries, and promote a shared platform for research and trans-disciplinary theoretical reflection on the complex societal issues as migration, culture, politics, gender and consequently of exchanging and questioning existing discourses in the social research. Our idea is to provide students, scholars and teachers with the opportunity to question and democratize these areas by direct participation on equal grounds, and thus to introduce new models of rethinking context-specific phenomena related to posed themes and, vice versa, to enrich theoretical paradigms with context specific phenomena and research.

Program Board of the summer school:

Sanja Bojanic, CAS SEE/CWS, Rijeka; Eric Fassin, University Paris 8; Brigita Miloš, Center for Women Studies, University of Rijeka; Adriana Zaharijevic, Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, Belgrade; Violetta Zentai, Central European University, Budapest; Petar Bojanic, Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, Belgrade

Organization Board:

Gazela Pudar Drasko, Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, Belgrade; Andrea Mešanović, University of Rijeka; Kristina Smiljanovic, University of Rijeka

Call for Application: PHILOSOPHY AND ARCHITECTURE Course in Dubrovnik

Social Inequalities and Cities is a CAS SEE course that will take place at IUC Dubrovnik from 19th to 23rd September 2016.

Course directors:

Snjezana Prijic Samarzija, CAS SEE – University of Rijeka, Petar Bojanic, CAS SEE – University of Rijeka, University of Belgrade, Avner de Shalit, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jonatan Wolff, University College London, Joerg Gleiter, Technical University of Berlin, Vladan Djokic, University of Belgrade

Course description:

The course includes perspectives of social and political philosophers and architects on the issue of social inequality in cities and intimately related issues such as people’s quality of life and wellbeing. The assumed notion of cities contains an institutional component (a jurisdiction issue), a spatial component (an architectural issue of housing, density of buildings and citizens, a continuous district of settlement), and a cultural component (a particular state of mind which we call “Civicism”). The main aim of the course is to discuss a proposed model of measuring inequality in European cities (as distinguished from states), and then to suggest principles for policies meant to reduce urban inequality in cities in which the majority of people reside, and some of which enjoy budgets larger than most countries’ budgets. At the course the lecturers will argue for bottom-up moral and political reasoning that avoids both full paternalism and full populism while combining objective and subjective approaches. We will discuss the view that philosophy and architecture should begin with understanding the challenges to policy makers and architects (as creators of the cities) from which they should derive to develop and offer the models for improving the general quality of life. Special accent will be put on the developing the Dynamic Public Reflective Equilibrium as the optimal research methodology aimed to reduce political, economic, gender and other forms of inequalities in the city.

* ECTS points available for MA and PhD students. The requirements for ECTS credits are (i) participation on at least 80% of lectures, (ii) presentation of the original paper on the topic of the course/discussion papers on the papers provided by lecturers

Course lecturers:

Snjezana Prijic Samarzija, CAS SEE – University of Rijeka

Petar Bojanic, CAS SEE – University of Rijeka, University of Belgrade

Joerg Gleiter, Technical University of Berlin

Vladan Djokic, University of Belgrade

Luka Skansi, University of Rijeka

Idis Turato, University of Zagreb

Avner de Shalit, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Jonatan Wolff, University College London

If you wish to apply for this course, please, visit IUC Dubrovnik.

Jörg H. Gleiter

Architecture and Philosophy: Nietzsche, Décadence and the Physiology of Architecture

On 19th February, 2016, Jörg H. Gleiter, Professor and the Head of the department of Architectural Theory, but also the managing director of the Institute of Architecture of Technische Universität Berlin, held a lecture organized by CAS SEE at the University of Rijeka.

In April 1888, in a tempestuous finale after arriving in Turin, Friedrich Nietzsche noted that this was the first city that was more “a paradise for the feet” than for the eyes. On December 16, 1988, he wrote in a letter to Heinrich Köselitz: “Recently I said to myself: to have a place that one does not want to leave, not even to go into the countryside—where one is glad to walk the streets! Earlier I would have thought it impossible.”
Whereas earlier Nietzsche, as the hermit of Sils-Maria, had found his philosophical inspirations, like Plato, walking in open nature, now in Turin he seemed to have switched to the side of Socrates. While Plato had withdrawn from the city to the quiet of the olive groves, i. e. to the groves of Academe, for Socrates, as Nietzsche noted, the whole city, the stoa, the streets, and the agora were places to stimulate his philosophical activity. As one could “walk through high archways for half hours in one breath”, in spring 1888 in Turin, just like Sokrates, Nietzsche enjoyed wandering among the arcades of Turin like a “philosophical flaneur”.
Nietzsche’s discovery of the city took place against the backdrop of his turn away from music as a “separate art” [Sonderkunst] of the nineteenth century and toward architecture as the “leading art” [Leitkunst] of 20thcentury’s modernism. Unnoticed in the 100 years of Nietzsche studies finally we have to take notice of Nietzsche’s belated yet highly significant turn to architecture.

Joerg H. Gleiter (Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil., M. S., BDA) is the head of the department of architectural theory and the managing director of the Institute of Architecture of Technische Universität Berlin. He has studied in Tübingen, Berlin, Venezia, and New York. He was a visiting professor at VIU (Venice International University) in Venice, at Waseda University in Tokyo, at Bauhaus-University in Weimar, and at Libera Università di Bozen-Bolzano in Italy. He is the founder and editor of the book series Architektur Denken, and co-editor of the International Internet Journal for Architectural TheoryCloud-Cuckoo-Land(Wolkenkuckucksheim). JoergGleiter is a two times fellow in residence of Kolleg Friedrich Nietzsche at Weimar. Among his publications are Architektur und Philosophie [Architecture and Philosophy] (ed. together with Ludger Schwarte, Bielefeld 2015); Ornament Today. Digital. Material. Structural (in English, ed. by Joerg H. Gleiter, Bolzano 2012); Urgeschichte der Moderne [Primordial History of Modernity] (Bielefeld 2010); Der philosophische Flaneur. Nietzsche und die Architektur [The Philosophical Flaneur. Nietzsche and Architecture](Würzburg 2009).

Lecture1 Lecture2 Lecture4Lecture3

CALL FOR APPLICATION: PLAYING BY THE RULES

Institutions in Action: The Nature and the Role of Institutions in the Real World

Place:  University of Rijeka, Croatia

Organizer: Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe, University of Rijeka: LabOnt – Department of Philosophy, University of Torino

Date:     May 27-28 2016

Deadline for applications: 31 March 2016

Political, social, economic, and legal institutions exert a great impact on the lives of individuals as social beings, as well as on those individuals’ own understanding of themselves, their potentialities, and aspirations. In big societies, institutions also offer information regarding what others do or tend to do. Still, in the last thirty years, both in political theory and in practice, the role of institutions has been seriously threatened by an ideological struggle against the welfare state and by a growing emphasis on individual responsibility and an individualist ethos. Once again we find ourselves having to examine the importance of the role of social institutions, their nature as actors, as well as their mutual influences.

Although institutions theoretically strive towards a better society, we think it important to begin with real world facts, that is, with a “new institutional realism” that attempts to understand and explain how various (legal, social, and political) institutions actually condition and influence one another, thus shaping the lives of individuals. Such influences, while seeking a betterment of social life, sometimes also restrict and diminish what might otherwise be a spontaneous exercise of collaborative and optimizing collective actions. ‎Both the constructive and the retractive or restrictive effects of institutions on human life make up the reality of the institution.

Another key role for institutions is in balancing perceptions and the various angles of social justice. Rawls famously described this balancing act as the quest of equilibrium between rational or intellectual arguments about what is just, on the one hand, and the intuitive grasp of justice within a political culture, on the other. Such balancing acts between arguments, intuitions and, increasingly, emotions (particularly strongly emphasized by Robert Solomon and others) ‎are entrusted to institutions in various social and value-contexts. How well they are equipped to perform such acts influences both the quality of the respective political systems and, more practically, the quality of people’s lives.

All these and many other aspects of the institution will be addressed by the conference, with a view both of advancing our theoretical grasp of the institution and our practical understanding and ability to influence and benefit from institutions in their myriad roles – whether regulative, that of service-provision, or, more controversially, that of conceptual and value-clarification or community-building.

Abstract submission and deadline:

Please send a Word document with your abstract (300-500 words) and your contact details to institutions_applications@cas.uniri.hr . The deadline for abstract submissions is 31 March 2016. Submitters will be notified of acceptance or rejection by 10 April 2016. The length of the talks will depend on how many proposals are accepted, but will be at least 25 minutes. Also, panels will be organized after proposals are accepted depending on their number and topics.

There will be no registration fees. Conference organisers will provide lunch and light refreshments during the conference program. Participants are kindly requested to make their own accommodation and travel arrangements.

Confirmed participants:

Maurizio Ferraris (University of Turin); Wolfgang Merkel (Berlin Social Science Center); Emmanuel Picavet (Pantheon-Sorbonne University, Paris); Shalini Randeria (Institute for Human Sciences, Vienna); Avner de-Shalit (Hebrew University, Jerusalem); Raimo Tuomela (University of Helsinki); Jonathan Wolff (University College London)

Conveners:

Nebojša Zelić

nzelic@ffri.hr

Sanja Bojanić

sanja.bojanic@uniri.hr

FELLOWSHIP APPLICATIONS: spring 2016

The CAS SEE Fellowship 2016-2017 Call for application will be published by the end of May 2016.

 

New Call for the CAS SEE Fellowship programme is opened.

Following the implementation of the First and Second Generation of CAS SEE Fellows in the academic year 2014-15 and the automne semester 2015, CAS SEE is announcing a new annual call for Fellowships for the spring 2016. This call is organised along selected thematic foci (see bellow) but also offer the possibility of open applications. The CAS SEE Fellowship Programme for spring 2016 will host 8 junior fellows. The Call for Applications will be closed on 10 December 2015. The third generation of fellows will assume their positions by February 15th 2016.

Inspired by the excellent cooperation of the First and Second Generation of CAS Fellows and their cooperative work that has created thematic synergies within smaller working groups among the fellows, CAS SEE Fellowship Programme in spring 2016 will stimulate the building of smaller groups of Fellows working on similar topics (or different aspects of one particular topic). The Fellows will present their work on a bi-weekly basis in Rijeka or other regional centers, and will engage more intensively in research in the wider region of Balkans region. All Fellows will spend first two weeks of the Fellowship at CAS SEE premises in Rijeka. One part of the Fellows will then according to their research interests be enabled to spend the rest of the Fellowship in the region, while attending the regular CAS SEE regional seminars. By implementing such a flexible regional approach while maintaining the spirit of CAS SEE Collegium the Fellows will be able to create new synergies within the Collegium as well as to pursue their research within wide networks of other scholars and partner institutions in the region perfectly designed to enrich their work.

The third Call for Fellows is inviting applicants to focus on two particular topics:

Refugees, Migration and Democracy: Faces of the protracted relationship

Next decade seems to be set to become a decade of migration and refugee flows. The year 2015 with hundreds of migrants dying while crossing the Mediterranean Sea or suffering on they way through the so called “Balkans route” towards the West is profoundly shaking the fundaments of Europe. Europe is struggling to cope with the newest refugee influx and some voices even describe the Union as facing the biggest challenge since the World War Two. On top of it the European self-understanding and the very core of European democracy seem to be in the process of renegotiation. Rise of the far-right parties and populism, new cleavages and inequalities within Europe, authoritarian challenges to democracy – the list of newly emerged phenomena is long. Migration poses new challenges to the definition and understanding of democracy. Thinking and re-thinking the very notion of democracy against this background seems to be a fundamental task of present time. Questions are manifold: How is the demos renegotiated? What is the new meaning of belonging and exclusion? Which new forms of transnationalism are emerging before our eyes? How can we re-re-conceptualize the very understanding of terms like “fleeing”, “migration”, “crossing borders” or “human dignity”, etc. in relation to the migration and refugee flows in this part of world Europe?

(Re)thinking (about) the Crisis: Exploring the danger and the opportunities of current crisis-hysteria

Economic crisis, refugee crisis, crisis of democracy, crisis of participation, crisis of Europe, crisis of capitalism, crisis of leftist thinking, crisis of liberalism, ecological etc. – crisis all around. We could go on endlessly by just naming few newspaper headlines. Crisis became an empty signifier; a notion so randomly and relentlessly used that our conceptual and empirical thinking about the crisis becomes blurred. So, how can we (re)think the very notion of crisis today? Which ways of empirically founded research of different sorts of crisis are needed? How to distinguish between crisis as the moment of changing the course of history of one particular phenomenon and a simple (often rhetorical) crisis hysteria? What are the ways of appreciating the crisis as a moment of catharsis? We invite both empirically oriented projects on current major crisis phenomena as well as projects focusing on the philosophy of crisis to apply.

We also invite applicants to submit open applications

 However, the applicants submitting proposals offering possibilities of thematic synergies with above mentioned topics (or enriching them with new aspects) are preferred.

Further information and details about the application procedure: FELLOWSHIP APPLICATION spring 2016

Erhard Busek, Shalini Randeria, Hedvig Morvai and Giuseppe Mastruzzo with CAS SEE Fellows

Working seminars with Erhard Busek (Chairman of the Institute for Danube Region and Central Europe) and Shalini Randeria (Rector of the IWM, Vienna) and CAS SEE Fellows took place on Tuesday, 24 November at the Sveučilišni odjeli building (Room 804). On that occasion Piro Rexhepi, Julija Sardelic, Giulia Carabelli, Aleksandra Djurasovic, Jeremy Walton and Francesco Marone presented their work in Rijeka.

On Wednesday, 25 November, at the same place was held another working seminar with Hedvig Morvai (Executive Director of the Fund for the Balkans, Belgrade / Bruxelles), Giuseppe Mastruzzo (Executive Director of the International University College of Turin) and CAS SEE Fellows.

Erhard Busek gave a talk “Berlin Process and Civil Society”

In times of crisis and growing authoritarian tendencies, the aim of this intervention is to discuss ways of keeping European and democratic values high in focus (be it in formal processes like Berlin process or in more informal settings like in social protests). Working Seminar with CAS SEE Fellows follows afterwards. Fellows will present their projects and work while in Rijeka.

Giuseppe Mastruzzo discussed with fellows “The Borders of Europe and the Borders of the Law: Refugees and Migrants as a Test Bench for Taking Exception to Freedom”

“Can anyone legally confine the global reach of migration? The current uncontainable flood of migrants and refugees into Europe could bring one to view as short-sighted the recent projects and measures of repression of global mobility induced by war or economics. Yet, the current instances of construction of the borders of Europe as walls may result in the long-sighted structuring of instances of permanent exception to everybody’s freedom of physical and intellectual mobility and expression within Europe, and eventually in an overall challenge to European democracy. Shielding the borders of Europe and individual European states could then be seen as pushing the borders of European law beyond democracy into the territory of innovative tyranny, where only mainstream discourse is allowed, while physical and intellectual nomadism is made illegal.” – Giuseppe Mastruzzo

 

Shalini Randeria

Fragmented Sovereignties in an Era of Globalisation: Challenges for Cunning States and Citizens

On 24th November, 2015, Shalini Randeria, Professor of Social Anthropology and Sociology, Rector of the Institute for Human Sciences (IWM) in Vienna, held a lecture organized by Center for Advanced Studies in collaboration with Department for Cultural Studies, (Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences) at the University of Rijeka.

“Two parallel developments since the 1990s have eroded the control of the nation-state over its territory and population. The increasing importance of supra-state actors (international institutions like the IMF, World Bank, EU) in domestic policy making has constrained the autonomy of states, on the one hand. The rise of sub-state actors (warlords, social movements) challenge the authority of the state from within, on the other. The resulting fragmentation of sovereignty poses problems for the state, which is expected to deliver ever more under conditions that weaken it externally and internally. However, it will be argued that often cunning states strategically claim weakness to mask the lack of political will in certain domains of governance. The talk will also analyse the dilemmas of these developments for the exercise of citizenship rights in a landscape of blurred boundaries between the public and the private.” – Shalini Randeria

 Shalini Randeria is a professor of Social Anthropology and Sociology at the Graduate Institute, a position she has held since autumn 2012. She has been Research Director at the Graduate Institute, and Rector of the Institute of Human Sciences (IWM), Vienna, since January 2015. She is Visiting Professor at the Social Science Research Centre Berlin (WZB). She is a former Member of the Senate of the German Research Council (DFG), President of the European Association of Social Anthropologists (EASA) and a Fellow of the Institute of Advanced Studies, Berlin. She was Max Weber Professor for Sociology at the University of Munich, Professor of Social Anthropology at the University of Zurich as well as Professor and Chair of the Department of Sociology and Social Anthropology of the Central European University Budapest. She currently serves on the Advisory Board of the Wenner-Gren Foundation, New York, and on the Editorial Board of the Annual Review of Anthropology. She has published widely on the anthropology of globalisation, law, the state and social movements. Her empirical research on India also addresses issues of post-coloniality and multiple modernities.

Shalini Randeria (2)Shalini Randeria (5)Shalini Randeria (1)Shalini Randeria (6)

CAS SEE Fellows at the conference “How to Act Together”

Fragile Infrastructures of Togetherness

Saturday, November 21, House of Culture, Faculty of Media and Communication, Belgrade

Chair: Sanja Milutinović Bojanić, CAS SEE, Rijeka

Aleksandra Djurasovic: “Oh, we could be together, if only the things weren’t so complicated”: Complexity Factor in the Late Post-Socialist Transition in Bosnia and Herzegovina

Giulia Carabelli: Affects That Bond and Disband: On the Production of Spaces for Being Together-with and -against in Bosnia Herzegovina During the 2014 Protests

Piro Rexhepi: After Ankara: Hierarchies of Togetherness and Humanitarian Violence

Francesco Marone: The Body as a Weapon: The Logic of Self-Sacrifice in Suicide Bombing

Julija Sardelic: Acts of Citizenship from the Margins: Romani Minorities and Social Movements in Southeastern Europe

Vera Tripodi: The Role of the Body in Politics, Epistemic Injustice, and Prejudice

Jeremy F. Walton: Merely Political: Agonistic Rhetorics of Unity and Anxieties of Proximity in Ankara