Kristina Smoljanovic

MARIJA OTT FRANOLIĆ

READ, THINK, FEEL, ACT: Can reading literature be a path to becoming empathic and critical individuals, ready for social change?

“Fiction enhances our vocabulary and imagination, gives us tools to describe and understand our lives, to make sense of the world. Reading fiction also offers readers a way to identify with the characters and imagine different worlds, experience new challenges, to put oneself in the shoes of the other and maybe even feel empathy with him, her or it.

In the light of rising xenophobia all over the world, and keeping in mind Adorno’s claim that the inability to identify with others led to Auschwitz, it is important to question whether identification with literary characters can be a fertile ground to identification with people in real life, those leading different lives. Can fiction, and especially fiction that disturbs us, offer readers a way to broaden their horizons, to stop seeing the “limited knowledge as truth” (Horkheimer & Adorno) and become empathic subjects ready to embrace societal changes? Or is this notion just wishful thinking?” 


Marija Ott Franolić is an independent researcher and currently a fellow at CAS SEE in Rijeka. She completed her PhD studies at the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Zagreb, with the thesis dedicated to exploring women’s everyday lives, based on their diaries and autobiographies. She is actively involved in the projects of the NGO Blaberon, aimed at encouraging reading and critical thinking. Her interests include the development of reading habits in younger children, the connection between reading and critical thinking, the influence of reading on our personality, feminism, women’s history, cultural studies, and women’s literature. She is the author of several scientific and popular articles, and has published the book Dnevnik ustremljen nedostižnom (A Diary of the Unattainable) about women’s everyday lives and their autobiographical texts.

GREGOR MODER

Truth in Politics

According to Spinoza, rights of individuals or groups are identical to their physical or psychical capabilities. If contemporary theory, including its Marxist variations, Althusser and Foucault, explains political and social relations as the relations of power and domination, of ideology and hegemony, then one could say that it follows the premises of Spinoza’s Political Treatise. However, while there is little doubt that power relations are a required condition of any sensible political theory, do they also constitute its sufficient condition? The panelists will argue this is not the case, and that one must indeed study not only power relations, but also a category which we can call the truth.


Kolenc, Komel and Moder are members of the Aufhebung International Hegelian Association based in Ljubljana, Slovenia. Dr. Bara Kolenc, philosopher and artist, winner of the Theatertreffen Stueckemarkt Commission of Work 2016 award, is the author of Repetition and Enactment: Kierkegaard, Psychoanalysis, Theatre (DTP, 2014). Dr. Mirt Komel, writer and philosopher, is the author of Discourse and Violence (DTP, 2012), The Socratic Touches (FDV, 2015) and The Attempt of a Touch (FDV, 2008). Dr. Gregor Moder, currently a fellow at CAS SEE Rijeka, teaches philosophy of art at the University of Ljubljana and is the author of Hegel and Spinoza: Substance and Negativity (Northwestern University Press, 2017).

SOCIAL ONTOLOGY SYMPOSIUM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF RIJEKA

The 19th edition of the International Conference Contemporary philosophical issues: Social Ontology Symposium at the University of Rijeka was officially opened with a welcome address by the newly elected University of Rijeka Chancellor, professor Snježana Prijić-Samaržija, followed by opening remarks by the CAS-SEE and Institute for Social Theory (University of Belgrade) director, professor Petar Bojanić.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Following opening words, professor emeritus John Searle (Department of Philosophy, University of California, Berkeley) took the chance to render a remarkable perspective on how status functions are manufactured in the complex structure of human society, chaired by professor Nenad Miščević, and followed with a likely unique lecture by Maurizio Ferraris (LabOnt, University of Torino) entitled The Color of Money, moderated by Sanja Bojanic, director of CAS-SEE.

The two-day symposium (May 22-23, 2017) resumed with presentations and debates with: Maurizio Ferraris, Jennifer Hudin, Tomoyuki Yamada, Abigail Klassen, Paolo de Lucia, Bojan Borstner, Michael Vlerick, Lorenzo Passerini Glazel, Boran Berčić, Giuseppe Lorini, Edoardo Fregonese, Zvonimir Šikić, Nenad Smokrović, Matija Lukač, Marko Luka Zubčić, Leonard Pektor, Denis Paušić, David Grčki, Iva Bubalo, Alice Borghi, Miljana Milojević, Guglielmo Feis, Aleksandar Šušnjar, Kristina Lekić, Benedikt Perak, Olga Markač, Nenad and Danilo Šuster.

The event was organized by Department of Philosophy, Faculty for Humanities and Social Sciences, Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe, University of Rijeka; Croatian Society for Analytic Philosophy, PhD programme “Contemporaneity and philosophy”, LabOnt, University of Torino and Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade.

SOCIAL ONTOLOGY SYMPOSIUM

19th Edition of the International Conference 

Contemporary Philosophical Issues

Date: May 22-23, 2017

Conference Venue: Faculty for Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Rijeka, Campus, Sveučilišna avenija 4, 51000 Rijeka

Organizer: Department of Philosophy, Faculty for Humanities and Social Sciences; Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe, University of Rijeka; Croatian Society for Analytic Philosophy, PhD programme “Contemporaneity and Philosophy”; LabOnt, University of Torino; Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade

Monday, May 22nd 2017
Plenary session (Room: 006)
09.00 –  09:30 Registration
09:30 – 10:00 Opening of the conference:

Snježana Prijić- Samaržija, chancellor of the University of Rijeka

Petar Bojanić, Director of the Center of  Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe, IFDT Belgrade University

Chairperson: Nenad Miščević
10:00 –11:00 John Searle

The Structure of Human Society

Chairperson: Sanja Bojanić
11:10 – 12:40 John Searle and Maurizio Ferraris

The Color of Money

13:00 – 14:30 Lunch break

 

Monday, May 22nd 2017
  TOPICS FROM JOHN SEARLE

Session A (room 401)

TOPICS FROM JOHN SEARLE

Session B (room 402)

Chairperson: Iris Vidmar Chairperson: Filip Čeč
14:30 – 15:15 Jennifer Hudin

Can Status Functions Be Discovered?

Tomoyuki Yamada

Formalizing Status Functions of Illocutionary Acts

15:20 – 16:05 Benedikt Perak

Emergence of the Social Reality in the Ontological Model of Lexical Concepts and Constructions

Abigail Klassen

On the Multitude of Kinds of Social Kinds: Problematizing John R. Searle’s Institutional and Non-institutional Social Kinds

16:05 – 16:20 Coffee break Coffee break
Chairperson: Ana Gavran Miloš Chairperson: Andrea Mešanović
16:20 – 17:05 Paolo de Lucia

Dynamics of Normative Impossibility

Bojan Borstner

Metaphysics of Sociality

17:10 – 17:55 Michael Vlerick

Explaining Religion: Introducing an Institutional Approach

Lorenzo Passerini Glazel

Impossible Tokens, Necessary Types

17:55 – 18:10 Coffee break Coffee break
Chairperson: Miljana Milojević Chairperson: Ivan Cerovac
18:10 – 18:55 Giuseppe Lorini

Constitutive Rules and Meta-institutional Concepts

Boran Berčić

Are Nations Social Constructs?

19:00 – 19:45 Zvonimir Šikić

Why do Laws Succeed or do not Succeed?

Edoardo Fregonese

Imposing Function through Document. The Case of an Urban Plan: Plano Tomorrow in Plano (TX)

    20:30 Conference dinner

 

Tuesday, May 23rd 2017
STUDENT WORKSHOPS WITH JOHN SEARLE AND JENNIFER HUDIN

Social ontology meets collective epistemology

Room 006

09:00 –  10:30 Opening remarks: Nenad Smokrović, director of the PhD programme Philosophy and Contemporaneity

John Searle, Jennifer Hudin

Moderator: Snježana Prijić-Samaržija

Matija Lukač: Joint Commitment and Collective  Intentionality – Starting Point and Quality  Criterion

Marko Luka Zubčić: Social Ontology, Social Epistemology and Inferential Individualism

Leonard Pektor: Stoic Epistemic Virtues of Groups – Can there be an Unproblematic Direct Transfer from Individuals to Groups?

Denis Paušić: Is Wide Science a Group that Knows?

10:20 – 10:30 Coffee break
10:30 – 11:05 Moderator: Nenad Smokrović

David Grčki: How Bad is the “Bad Argument”

Aleksandar Šušnjar: Some Reflections on Searle’s View on the Connection between Language and Institution

Kristina Lekić: Group-mind and autism: Can we Talk about the Cognition of the Group of Autistic Persons?

 

Tuesday, May 23rd 2017
  TOPICS FROM JOHN SEARLE

Session A (room 401)

VARIA

Session B (room 402)

Chairperson: Iris Vidmar Chairperson:  Neven Petrović
11:10 – 11:55 Guglielmo Feis

Some (Alternative?) Facts for Searlean Social Ontology

Miljana Milojevic

Extended Mind and Personal Identity

12:00 – 12:45 Alice Borghi

Groups and Populism: a Case Study on Searlean Deontic Powers

Iva Bubalo

Semantics in Computational Cognition?

12:50 – 14:00 Lunch break

 

Tuesday, May 23rd 2017
  TOPICS FROM JOHN SEARLE

Session A (room 401)

VARIA

Session B (room 402)

Chairperson:  Nebojša Zelič Chairperson: Boran Berčić
14:15 – 15:00 Imke Maessen

Ordinary Citizens as the Source of Legal Validity

Danilo Šuster

On the Limits of Argumentation

 

15:05 – 15:50 Maria Matuszkiewicz

An Argument for a Minimal Mental Internalism

Nenad Smokrović

A Real Nature of Argumentation: Individual or Social?

15:50 – 16:00 Coffee break Coffee break
Chairperson: Ivan Cerovac Chairperson: Boran Berčić
16:00 – 16:45 Matjaž Potrč

Objectivity of the Brain in a Vat

Olga Markač

Analogical Reasoning

 

 

MAREK SZILVASI

Does it matter for excluded Roma whether water is public or private? Case study of Slovenia

“Access to water especially in geographic regions threatened by water scarcity, have been increasingly elevated to the centre of the attention of governments, international community, and businesses across the world. Many political leaders and CEOs of multinational corporations have integrated water in their agenda and stated that water has become a new (blue) gold, and it should now to be treated like oil.
The predictions of irreversible water scarcity and consequential global corporate grab due to its increasing value might sound to most of us in Europe as a problem of the third world, or a scene from a science fiction movie or distant future at best. We take clean drinking water for granted. It is abundant and affordable, provided directly in our homes, and checked continuously to ensure it meets quality and safety standards.
Yet, not only that most of the water corporations and their advocacy groups have headquarters in Europe, all across Europe there are people living without access to improved water resources and sanitation. According to the United Nations Economic Committee for Europe (UNECE) and World Health Organisation (WHO), 12 per cent of population, some 110 million people, in the pan-European region is still without access to safe drinking water, and many of them are Roma.
In November 2016, in response to a citizens’ campaign, Slovenia became the first EU country to add the right to water to its Constitution, but the implementation of the new constitutional right has yet to be observed, especially in Romani communities.
After decades of petitioning local authorities to provide their households with drinking water and functioning sanitation, in March 2014, 16 Roma from two Roma neighbourhoods in Slovenia filed a complaint to the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR). The Hudorovič, Novak and Others v. Slovenia cases became the first right to water case at the ECtHR.
By analysing the case study of Slovenia, the first EU country, which recognised the right to water in its Constitution (2016) while also the first country sued at the European Court of Human Rights for failing to secure access to water to their citizens of Roma origin (2014), this presentation will point out the complex discourse of contemporary water movements and the very specific position of Roma living in social exclusion and housing informality. I will argue that despite the progressive legal framework and social movements claiming the right to water, the concerns of Roma are often neglected not only by the private and public water suppliers, but also by water activists. Due to the prevailing situation of anti-Roma discrimination and social exclusion, Roma have to make parallel claims on the access to water.”


Marek Szilvasi an independent scholar-activist. He received his PhD in Sociology from the University of Aberdeen, the United Kingdom, MA in Sociology and Philosophy from the Palacký University Olomouc, Czech Republic, and MA in the European Studies (Europe in the Wider World) from the University of Groningen, Netherlands. His PhD research has been sponsored by the interdisciplinary Centre for Citizenship, Civil Society, and Rule of Law (CISRUL).
His primary research interests lie in the fields of sociology of (human) rights, political philosophy, socio-legal and post-colonial theories, citizenship, social inclusion and equality paradigms, and environmental justice, all these with a particular focus on the situation of Roma in European societies.
Marek teaches at the Institute of Politics and International Studies of the ELTE University in Budapest, Hungary, and works as Head of research and human rights education of the European Roma Rights Centre (ERRC). He is also a board member of the PAD Foundation advocating environmental justice in CEE. He has been awarded the Martin Alexandersson Research Scholarship of the Raoul Wallenberg Institute for 2017.

 

 

 

 

MATEJA KURIR

Architecture as Ideology: the perspectives of critical theory (Benjamin and Adorno). An attempt

“The ideological attunement of architecture will be the key focus of the lecture, where the work of two promi-nent philosophers of critical theory on the topic of architecture, namely Walter Benjamin and Theodor W. Adorno, will be outlined. (more…)

CAS SEMINAR WITH ROBERT D. KAPLAN 

Robert D. Kaplan visited Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe on April 21, 2017 and gave a talk about how technology is making geography and geopolitics smaller, more anxious and claustrophobic, so that all of Eurasia is coming together as a single conflict system, even while Europe divides from within. Precisely because globalization leads to integration, it also leads to increased interactions across regions and this intensifies conflict and instability. Kaplan also reflected on the European crisis, in all its aspects, with thoughts and questions about how it looks from the viewpoint of Rijeka, Central Europe, and the former Yugoslavia. Robert D. Kaplan was joined in discussion with Giacomo Scotti, Vanni d’Alessio and Ervin Dubrović.


Robert D. Kaplan is the bestselling author of seventeen books on foreign affairs and travel translated into many languages, including Earning the Rockies, In Europe’s Shadow, Asia’s Cauldron, The Revenge of Geography, Monsoon, The Coming Anarchy, and Balkan Ghosts.
He is a senior fellow at the Center for a New American Security and a senior advisor at Eurasia Group. For three decades he reported on foreign affairs for The Atlantic. He held the national security chair at the United States Naval Academy and was a member of the Pentagon’s Defense Policy Board. Foreign Policy magazine twice named him one of the world’s “Top 100 Global Thinkers.”

 

NATASHA SARDZOSKA

Mapping of spatial memory in limitrophe cities: border-landscapes and border-bodies

“My project draws on limitrophe cities and interzones within border-zones landscapes and deserted places where abandon, detachment, twisted memory and emotional representation shape the place as liminal and as ontologically uncertain. I argue border passages, which are today spaces deprived from meaning, or rather Phantomgrenzen, such as former Schengen crossings, such as empty and forgotten architectures of the post-Yugoslavian period, where space is under continuous reconfiguration and, at some point, becomes politically critical and artistically relevant. Thus, those spaces, although deprived from substantial phenomenological nexus, are impregnated with the emotional memory of a place that no longer exist; in this sense, they are not places where something ends and something else begins its existence, but rather places where something starts its presencing (to name few actions which gain their semantical denomination at the border crossing itself: smuggling, trafficking, exile, homelessness, expatriation etc.).

I elaborate political meanings of borders, which are perpetually blurred and shifted in tidal geography, the cultural mummification, the erasure of preexisting maps and the revival of “quick sand” porous boundaries. I focus on the production of flows of non-targeted displacements and dislocations, indeterminate journeys and nostalgia for a lost space instigated by the political shattering. I will, therefore, present the border-artwork of Sara Salamon, visual artist from Rijeka, who is disintegrating, misplacing, reinventing and questioning the invisible phantom-border passage between Gorizia and Nova Gorica, unveiling interrelations of cultural mutation processes from former spatial memory towards transitory emotional memory. The goal is to rethink the interconnected mappings, which have become marginalized and diasporic but at the same time a center and a nucleus of cognitive anxiety proliferating movements and unpredictable spatial trajectories. The question I am tackling is: is it so important to draw boundaries, charts and maps when the world has turned culturally liminal, flow and creolizing?”

Natasha Sardzoska was born in Skopje in 1979. Researcher, interpreter and translator (IT, FR, EN, ES, PT, MK, SR), Italian language professor, poet, writer, journalist and cultural manager, she has been living and working in Paris, Milano, Stuttgart, Brussels, Lisbon, Belgrade, Heidelberg, Bergamo and Skopje. She holds a Bachelor in Italian language and literature and comparative literature from the University Ss. Cyril and Methodius in Skopje. With the Erasmus Mundus fellowship from the European Commission she has obtained a Master in media and cultural studies from the New University of Lisbon, the University of Perpignan and the University of Bergamo and a PhD in cultural anthropology from the Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen, University of Bergamo and Sorbonne Nouvelle in Paris.She has taught at Schiller International University in Heidelberg, the University for Tourism in Skopje, the University of Bergamo and the South-East European University “Max Van der Stoel”. She is part of the research group Phantom Borders at the Humbolt University in Berlin. She has been working as interpreter for the Senate of the Italian Republic, the Italian Ministry of Justice, the Italian National Antimafia Bureau, the International Organization for Migration, IBF Consulting, the Macedonian Ministry of Defense, the Macedonian Academy for Judges and Prosecutors and the European Commission and as expert in the French National Agency for Higher Education Evaluation AERES. She was editor of the official magazine of the Erasmus Mundus Association, where she was serving as Public Information Officer, and has interviewed well-known politicians amongst which Marielle De Sarnez.

She has attended international conferences and published in international reviews. She cooperates with the reviews Doppiozero, Nuova Prosa, Milan and Transmidia, Rio de Janeiro. She has published several poetry books, essays and literary translations (Saramago, Carducci, Pasolini, Tabucchi, Carneiro, Carvalho, Tavares, Bojunga, Couto, Bufalino, Braga, Collodi, Piperino) from Portuguese and Italian language. She collaborates with Radio Capodistria for the in-depth analysis program Il Vaso di Pandora, in Italian language. She has founded the Argentinian tango association in Macedonia promoting Argentine culture in the Balkans.

Call for papers – John Searle Symposium

19th Edition of the International Conference
Contemporary Philosophical Issues

Place:  University of Rijeka, Croatia

Organizers:  Department of Philosophy, Faculty for Humanities and Social Sciences; Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe, University of Rijeka; Croatian Society for Analytic Philosophy; PhD programme “Contemporaneity and philosophy”, LabOnt, University of Torino; Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade

Date: May 22-23, 2017

Deadline for applications: April 30, 2017

We cordially invite you to the 19th conference Contemporary Philosophical Issues: John Searle Symposium on Social Ontology.

The annual conference is this year dedicated to philosopher John Searle, whose influence on and relevance for the contemporary analytic philosophy, cognitive sciences and neurobiology can hardly be overestimated. Professor Searle’s work in philosophy of language, philosophy of mind, metaphysics and epistemology set foundations for many of the most discussed issues in these fields, and his renditions of problems as diverse as consciousness, intentionality, meaning, free will, artificial intelligence, reality, social reality, human rights, institutions and power, provided new directions for philosophers and scientists alike. In his books, Seeing Things as They Are: A Theory of Perception and Making the Social World: The Structure of Human Civilization, as well as in his work at the recently founded The John Searle Center for Social Ontology, Professor Searle focuses on themes in social sciences, which is why our focus at the conference will be on social ontology. However, we appreciate papers on all and every aspect of John Searle’s rich philosophical oeuvre.

Confirmed participants:

In addition to John Searle, our guests will be Jennifer Hudin, Director of the John Searle Center for Social Ontology, Maurizio Ferraris, LabOnt University of Torino, Tiziana Andina, Director of LabOnt University of Torino, Paolo de Lucia, University of Milano, Giuseppe Lorini, University of Cagliari, Nenad Miščević, University of Maribor, Boran Berčić, University of Rijeka, Snježana Prijić-Samaržija, University of Rijeka, Petar Bojanić, Universities of Belgrade and Rijeka

Abstract submission and deadline:

If you are interested in participating, please send a title of your paper and a short abstract of maximum 400 words by April 30th 2017 to Iris Vidmar (ividmar@ffri.hr) and Andrea Mešanović (andrea.mesanovic@gmail.com). Notifications regarding the acceptance will be issued by May 1st 2017.

Please note that our conference allows for the possibility of presentation of papers concerned with contemporary themes in analytic philosophy that do not address Professor Searle’s opus directly. These presentations will be organized as a parallel session of the conference, which, in case of a large number of applicants, can extend to May 24th. Ideally, we designate 30 minutes for presentations of papers, followed by 15 minutes for discussions.

There will be no registration fee. Conference organizers will provide lunch and light refreshments during the conference program. Participants are kindly requested to make their own accommodation and travel arrangements.

Organizational Committee:

Andrea Mešanović

Iris Vidmar

Luca Malatesti

Gazela Pudar Drasko

Nenad Smokrović

Snježana Prijić-Samaržija

Sanja Bojanić

Vera Tripodi

CAS SEE FELLOWS INAUGURATION

The Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe (CAS SEE) at the University of Rijeka organized the 5th Fellows Inauguration at the University Campus Akvarij caffé on Thursday, March 16, 2017.

The Fellows will stay and work at the CAS SEE premises in the following ten months divided in two terms (Spring and Autumn 2017/2018) and present their research to the representatives of the University, the Academia and the public.


Themes of their research are relevant for the current social and humanistic political debates which focus on:
1.            Making Inclusive Cities: Towards Participatory Governance Practices 
2.           Critical Theory

During their stay in Rijeka, the CAS-SEE fellows will, according to their research themes and proposals, be involved in the work of the Sweet&Salt flagship, hosted by the CAS SEE, within the Rijeka 2020 – European Capital of Culture project.

The fifth generation of CAS SEE Fellows was welcomed by:
Vice-rector for Students and Studies, Full Prof. Snježana Prijić-Samaržžija, Ph.D., Rector-elect at the University of Rijeka, Executive director of CAS SEE, Ass. Prof. Sanja Bojanić, Ph.D., Vice-Dean for International relations at the Academy of Applied Arts in Rijeka, Irena Kregar – Šegota, Development and Strategic Partnerships Director, Rijeka 2020 Agency, Full Prof. Idis Turato, Sweet&Salt Flagship Director (Rijeka 2020 – ECOC)

Please join us in congratulating the following 2017-2018 Spring and Autumn CAS-SEE Fellowship Awards, University of Rijeka recipients:

SPRING 2017

Mateja Kurir  (Ljubljana, Slovenia) Architecture as ideology: the perspectives of critical theory from modernism to the present
Gruia Badescu (Oxford University, UK) Spatializing Cultural Policies and Activism in Croatia and Romania: A Comparative, Transnational Study
Marek Szilvasi (Budapest, Hungary) Between Commodity and Common Public Good: Access to Water and its Relevance for Roma People in Europe
Natasha Sardžoska (Skopje, Macedonia) Mapping of spatial memory in limitrophe cities, landscapes, borders and bodies in Istria
Gregor Moder (University of Ljubljana, Slovenia) Critical Theory. Truth in Politics: Comedy, Sophistry and Critique
Marija Ott Franolić (Zagreb, Croatia) Read, Think, Act