Kristina Smoljanovic

The rise of nationalism in Europe: causes, effects, and comparison between Western and Eastern Europe

1st International Conference
of the Faculty of Political Science, University of Montenegro

in partnership with Friedrich Ebert Stiftung and Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe, University of Rijeka

SEE ‘Academia in Dialogue’ Series

The rise of nationalism in Europe: causes, effects, and comparison between Western and Eastern Europe

Podgorica, 8-9 October 2018


PROGRAM
October 7

19.00  | Reception dinner for participants

October 8, Day 1

Conference Venue: Rectorate, University of Montenegro

08.45-09.00  | Registration

09.00-09.30  | Welcome address

Ivan Vuković, Program Committee of the Conference, Mayor of Podgorica and Vice-Dean Faculty of Political Science, University of Montenegro

Max Brändle, Director at Friedrich Ebert Stiftung Office to Serbia and Montenegro

Petar Bojanić, Director of Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade and Center for Advanced Studies of Southeast Europe, University of Rijeka

09.30-10.30  | Keynote lecture

Wolfgang Merkel, Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin, Germany, Right-wing Populism and its Challenge to Democracy in Europe

Moderator: Gazela Pudar Drasko, University of Belgrade

10.30-10.45  | Coffee break

10.45-12.00  | Session 1: Nationalist challenges in Southeast Europe

Participants:

Srdjan Radovic, Ethnographic Institute, Belgrade, Serbian Nationalism

Sead Turcalo, University of Sarajevo, Nationalism in Bosnia and Herzegovina

12.00-13.00  | Keynote lecture

Reinhard Heinisch, University of Salzburg, Everybody is a populist now! Myths, errors, and inflationary use of a new phenomenon

Moderator: Nemanja Stankov, University of Montenegro

13.00-15.00  | Lunch break

15.00-16.30  | Session 2: The Rise of the Radical Right in Europe

Participants:

Vedran Dzihic, oiip, Right-wing populist nationalism: Where and why (South) Eastern Europe and the „West“ come together

Nader Nourbakhsh, University of Tehran: Rise of the Far Right Extremism in Europe: Causes and Consequences

Arianna Piacentini, CAS SEE and University of Milan: Anti-immigrant United States of Europe? The populist representations of European culture and heritage and the South-North divide

16.30-17.00 | Coffee break

17.00-19.00 | Panel discussion Between East and West: Nationalism in Southeast Europe

Max Brändle, Director at Friedrich Ebert Stiftung Office to Serbia and Montenegro

Wolfgang Merkel, Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin, Germany

Daphne Halikiopoulou, University of Reading, Great Britain

Zsolt Enyedi, Central European University, Budapest, Hungary

Petar Bojanić, Director of Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade and Center for Advanced Studies of Southeast Europe, University of Rijeka

Vedran Džihić, oiip

19.00 | Dinner for participants

October 9, Day 2

Conference Venue: Rectorate, University of Montenegro

09.00-10.00  | Keynote lecture

Zsolt Enyedi, Central European University, Budapest, Hungary: Populist Establishment

Moderator: Milivoj Beslin, University of Belgrade

10.00-11.30  | Session 4: The Rise of Nationalism in Europe: A Comparative Perspective

Jan Muś, Vistula University, Warsaw: Nationalism as a reply to liberal hegemony. PiS case

Wawrzyniec Konarski, Vistula University (Warsaw): Ethnicity, Nationalism and Politics in Central Europe: Selected Historical Traditions and Current Consequences

Almedina Vukic, University of Montenegro: Losing my region? Nationalism perceived through experience of central governments in the United Kingdom and Spain

11.30-11.45  | Coffee break

11.45-12.45  | Keynote lecture

Daphne Halikiopoulou, University of Reading, Great Britain, What is new and what is nationalist about Europe’s new Nationalism? Explaining the rise of the far right in Europe

Moderator: Gazela Pudar Drasko, University of Belgrade

12.45-13.00  | Closing remarks

13:00  | Lunch break

After lunch | Excursion: Cruising in Bay of Kotor


 

Closing of the Summer school of Innovative interpretation of industrial heritage

The press conference and the official closing of the Summer School of Innovative Interpretation of Industrial Heritage program was held on Friday, September 28th, at the Delta Lab in Rijeka. The Summer school is a part of the “Touristic Valorisation of Representative Monuments of Rijeka’s Industrial Heritage” program, and on this subject, the program was presented by Prof. Snježana Prijić Samaržija, Rector of the University of Rijeka, Mr Ivan Šarar, Head of the Department of Culture and the project leader of “Touristic Valorisation of Representative Monuments of Rijeka’s Industrial Heritage”, Dr. Bert Ludwig, director of European Heritage Volunteers and Marina Batinić, co-founder of Culture Hub Croatia, alongside of Kristina Pandža, Project and Research Coordinator at the University of Rijeka – the education and research component and one of the partners in project implementation.

The University Rector, Prof. Snježana Prijić Samaržija stated that it takes courage and motivation to come to a foreign city and to try to interpret its industrial and cultural heritage, and that the whole concept of the summer school is innovative in itself so that the product remaining as its legacy, the proposals of student’s interpretation of Rijeka’s (industrial) heritage is equally innovative as is the way it has come to being.

Mr Ivan Šarar pointed out that sometimes the current social climate and the “tones” of daily political polemics can go far from any congruous interpretations of the heritage that is the subject of this debate. It’s really about two allegoric and symbolically charged represents of the city. These two objects are and continue to remain open platforms for diverse interpretations, so these (student’s) inputs remain equally important in a reality that never ceases to interpret its history.

Dr Bert Ludwig presented the work and activities of European Heritage Volunteers organization with different participatory projects open to the public, such as European Heritage Volunteers Projects, European Heritage Training Projects, World Heritage UNESCO Projects, EHV Partner Projects.

Marina Batinić, co-founder of Culture Hub Croatia reflected on the importance of the experiences accumulated abroad with exchange being one of the most valuable resources of the volunteers which indeed reflects on the local context, but also manages to shape broader, international co-operations and projects. At the end, she concluded that history is valuable in itself – it cannot and doesn’t have to be forgotten but giving chance to the young experts to provide some possible future perspectives and a positive relationship with the heritage is really what is most important.

After a brief discussion on the Project goals and the relevance of heritage interpretation, the student – volunteers from Croatia, Italy, Hungary, Chile, Germany, Russia, Taiwan and China took the stage to present the innovative heritage interpretation proposals, focusing on the “Galeb” ship and the Sugar Refinery administrative building in Rijeka.

During the past two weeks of intense workshops and discussions in Rijeka, the final report „Between Past, Present and Future – Interpreting the Industrial Heritage of Rijeka” with more than thirty proposals was produced as a result and the legacy of the volunteers joint work and can be downloaded here, as well as on the Center for Industrial Heritage and Culture Hub Croatia websites.

Summer School of Innovative Interpretation of Industrial Heritage

Summer School of Innovative Interpretation of Industrial Heritage, organized by Center for Industrial Heritage and Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe of University of Rijeka in cooperation with Culture Hub Croatia and European Heritage Volunteers, started on Monday, 17th of September with the volunteers’ visit to the City of Rijeka, where they were welcomed by Deputy Mayor Marko Filipović, Ivan Šarar, Head of the Department of Culture at the City of Rijeka and Ms Helga Večerinović, expert associate for product development at the City of Rijeka Turist Board.

During the two weeks long Summer School, the students from Croatia, China, Russia, Chile, Hungary, Germany, Italy and Taiwan investigated and researched the possibilities of the innovative interpretation of the school ship „Galeb“ and the Sugar Refinery, two representative objects of Rijeka’s industrial heritage, which are currently in the process of renovation. The mentioned reception at the City of Rijeka was also an opportunity for a short presentation of the project “Touristic Valorisation of Representative Monuments of Rijeka’s Industrial Heritage”, funded by the European Regional Development Fund – Operational Program “Competitiveness and Cohesion”. The Croatia’s Ministry of Regional Development and the EU funds provided substantial amount of 68.891.606,18 kuna for the project’s development, with the total worth of the project of 81.339.442,05 kuna.

On Tuesday, 18th of September, Summer School program continued in Delta Lab, with a Conference on the Interpretation of Industrial Heritage, with experts from the field of cultural and industrial heritage valorisation and interpretation, including doc. dr. sc. Darko Babić (University of Zagreb, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Department of Information and Communication Sciences) co-founder of the “Interpret Croatia” Association, who provided a remarkable and detailed overview of the interpretation theory, focusing on the need of creating an emotional link between the audiences and the (information regarding) the heritage, and focusing on interpretation as a creative informal education and, moreover, the importance of understanding that heritage comes into being by being interpreted. He concluded that the ideal situation is that in which the local communities recognize their heritage and know what they want to gain from it and then seek the experts to tell its story.

The program continued with lectures and workshop with the „Muses“: Dragana Lucija Ratković Aydemir and Ivana Jagic Boljat who emphasized the importance of good communication and openness in working with the clients and the users of the interpretation, and the pronounced relevance of understanding the needs of the local communities from the very start of interpretation process. The afternoon session continued with lectures and presentations of best practice examples with Jelena Mateševac (Primorje-Gorski Kotar County) presenting the project Cultural-tourist Route “the Routes of the Frankopans”, followed by mr. sc. Vlatko Čakširan (City Museum Sisak) presenting the „Info center of Industrial Heritage – Holland House“. Best practice example with regards to EU projects aimed at promoting co-operation between central European cities, and providing other cities, though their associations, with recommendations on how to improve hidden cultural heritage potentials were presented by Sonja Lukin and Tanja Pavlovic – Flegar (City of Rijeka), with the „Forget Heritage“ project, followed by Luka Rodela (Molekula Association) presenting the re-use center pilot within the same project, providing us with a short „beginners guide“ to heritage management in the context of forlorn industrial factories of Rijeka.

On Wednesday, September 19th, the most important current Rijeka project, Rijeka 2020 – European Capital of Culture was presented by Dorian Celcer, Partnership and Protocol Coordinator at the Rijeka2020 d.o.o.  He provided a showcase of the initial idea, application process, current developments and the seven flagships overview with the goals and legacy of the project, expected after 2020.

On Thursday, the volunteers were greeted by the University of Rijeka representatives, Prof. Sanja Baric, Vice Rector for Studies and Students, and Associate Professor Bojana Ćulum, Department of Education at the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, giving an overview of the University’s policies and strategies aimed at developing and fostering student activism and volunteering. The volunteers also met with the representatives of the Student Council at the University of Rijeka: Margime Hasani, Tea Dimnjašević and Kruno Topolski, followed by a walk around the University Campus.

On Friday, the students worked on the SWOT analysis of the Galeb ship, a week-long task with an agenda of forming innovative interpretation proposals and a final document to be presented after working in situ at the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, in vicinity of the Sugar Refinery administrative building, a magnificent late Baroque palace remained from the former complex, built in 1786 in Rijeka. The building is currently in the process of renovation within the program of the “Touristic Valorisation of Representative Monuments of Rijeka’s Industrial Heritage” project, funded by the European Regional Development Fund – Operational Program “Competitiveness and Cohesion”. Once renovated, in 2020 the Baroque palace will become the new City Museum of Rijeka. The project is managed by the City of Rijeka in partnership with the Rijeka Tourist Board and the University of Rijeka – Center for Industrial Heritage and the CAS SEE.

Over the weekend, the volunteers visited Labin and Raša in Istria, where they had a guided tour and a short lecture on the interesting and somewhat hidden history of coal mining industrial town of Raša. On Monday, the working session continued with the Sugar Refinery analysis at the DeltaLab.

On Tuesday afternoon at Delta Lab the volunteers had another public event in the framework of the International Workshop on Interpretation of Industrial Heritage summer school, they were presenting examples of good practices from all over the world.

On Wednesday, the morning session began with a guided visit to the Sugar Refinery administrative building and then we continued the day with the analysis for the Sugar Refinery interpretation proposals at the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in Rijeka during another public event, the Open Doors Day, which gave the opportunity to welcome guests at the working site of the Museum. The volunteers also visited the opening of the newly built RiHub, a co-working space aimed at hosting the creative industry, Rijeka 2020 d.o.o. offices and freelancers as well as providing a space for versatile educational and creative events.

The final proposal presentation of innovative interpretations by the European Heritage Volunteers is set for Friday, Saturday 28th, starting at 5.00 pm at the Delta Lab (Delta 5) in Rijeka.


Notation, Algorithm, Criticism: Towards a Critical Epistemology of Architecture

Venue and date: IUC, Dubrovnik, September 17-22, 2018

Course description:

In modernity, there is no place for architecture without critical reflection, just as modern culture without cultural criticism is no better than the barbarism it has replaced (Schnädelbach). Critique is necessary of any activity, be it artistic, political, or scientific. In 1976, it was the „crisis of utopia” that laid the foundation for the late Manfredo Tafuri’s “ideological criticism”. By contrast, the philosopher and politician Massimo Cacciari maintained that crisis “must be produced”, thus proclaiming that any intellectual position that does not posit itself as productive in regard to crisis is reactionary.

Admittedly, we look back today with a certain nostalgia on a critical theory of architecture as it emerged in the 1960s — the heyday of critical thought in sociology and philosophy. Architects such as Peter Eisenman, Frank Gehry, and Bernhard Tschumi along with philosophers such as Theodor Adorno, Jacques Derrida, Gianni Vattimo, and Fredric Jameson were among the pioneers of critical discourse in architecture. Each had their own specific critical agenda, with some of them more inclined toward subversive methods that aimed at undermining architecture as the last stronghold of metaphysics. In architecture, critical theory always coincides with critical practice.

Since then, criticism has been absorbed and utilized by the very same institutions that it had helped to create. It can hardly be overlooked that in digital consumer societies, criticism has become a powerful economic agent. “The task of criticism has, in fact, changed,” Tafuri wrote in the introduction to his seminal book Theories and History of Architecture, published in 1976. But even more has changed with the advent of digital media technology. In unprecedented ways, today’s media technologies interfere with the practice of knowledge and change them according to their own – digital – agenda. Cacciari’s plea for crisis as a driving force for the production of knowledge has turned into a common cultural practice.

The seminar addressed the concept of critique in architecture from a historic as well as contemporary perspective. It investigated core concepts such as critique and practice, authorship and agency, history and documentation, concept and diagram, as well as idea and project. What are the possibilities of critical practice today in the age of digital transparency? What are the cultural, aesthetic, and social implications of the current transition from 2-D design processes to 3-D modeling (BIM)? Is this shift to digital media technology of equal importance as Alberti’s 15th century shift to notation? The transfer of ideas into drawings onto paper first opened up architecture to the creative and intellectual play of representation, and allowed for references to architectural history and its philosophical ideas. Architectural practice turned into a critical practice when it separated thinking about architecture from building architecture. The potential of graphic notation transformed architecture into a modern, ambivalent, contradictory, and critical cultural practice equal to literature and philosophy. At times, it seems as if media technology hollows out architecture’s critical consciousness and returns it to a simple practice of mere physical and material presence.

Course Directors:

Prof. Snjezana Prijic-Samarzija (University of Rijeka)

Prof. Joerg Gleiter (Technical University of Berlin)

Prof. Petar Bojanic (University of Belgrade/University of Rijeka)

Prof. Giovanni Durbiano (Politecnico di Torino)

Prof. Alessandro Armando (Politecnico di Torino)

 Lecturers:

Prof. Snjezana Prijic-Samarzija (University of Rijeka)

Prof. Joerg Gleiter (Technical University of Berlin)

Prof. Petar Bojanic (University of Belgrade/University of Rijeka)

Prof. Sanja Bojanic (University of Rijeka)

Prof. Alessandro Armando (Politecnico di Torino)

Dr. Lidia Gasperoni (Technical University of Berlin)

Dr. Christoph Engemann (Bauhaus-Universität Weimar)

Summer School Program

 

Industrial Heritage Interpretation Conference

Center for Industrial Heritage
and Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe at the University of Rijeka
in collaboration with the Culture Hub Croatia and European Heritage Volunteers

invite you to the

“Industrial Heritage Interpretation” Conference

September 18, 2018 at the Delta Lab (Delta 5, 51000 Rijeka)

Photo credits: Museum of the City of Rijeka

09.00 – 14.00 | Morning Session

09.00 – 10:30 | „Introduction to Heritage Interpretation – theoretical basis and principles“, doc. dr. sc. Darko Babić, University of Zagreb, Department of Information and Communication Sciences, Museology and Heritage Management Section, co-founder and president of the association Interpret Croatia

10.30 – 12:00 | „Touristic Valorisation of Industrial Heritage – trends, possibilities, products“, mr. sc. Vlasta Klarić, co-founder and vice-president of the heritage interpretation association – Interpret Croatia

12.00 – 14:30 | „Interpretative Heritage Planning“, lecture and workshop, Dragana Lucija Ratković Aydemir, Muze d.o.o.


15.30 – 18.00 | Afternoon Session

Participating:

Jelena Matešavac, Primorsko – goranska County, project Cultural-touristic route Itineraries of Frankopan

mr. sc. Vlatko Čakširan – Municipal Museum of Sisak, project Info center of industrial heritage – Holland House

Sonja Lukin, Tanja Pavlović- Flegar, the City of Rijeka, project Forget Heritage

Luka Rodela, Molekula association, presentation of the reuse center in the framework of the Forget Heritage project.

Photo credits: Museum of the City of Rijeka

The Summer School of Innovative Industrial Heritage Interpretation is organized by the Center for Industrial Heritage and the Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe at the University of Rijeka in cooperation with the European Heritage Volunteers organization and the Culture Hub Croatia Platform. The Summer School is one of University of Rijeka’s activities, within the program of the “Touristic Valorisation of Representative Monuments of Rijeka’s Industrial Heritage” project, funded by the European Regional Development Fund – Operational Program “Competitiveness and Cohesion”. The Croatia’s Ministry of Regional Development and the EU funds provided substantial amount of 68.891.606,18 kuna for the project’s development with the total worth of the project of 81.339.442,05 kuna. Find more information on the Project at the official website of the Center for Industrial Heritage at the University of Rijeka.

Round Table “In Tribute to Saba Mahmood” with Judith Butler

Round Table with Judith Butler “In Tribute to Saba Mahmood” took place at the Art-kino Croatia in Rijeka on June 20th 2018,  within the summer school “Critique of Violence Now: from Thinking to Acting against Violence” program.

The round table discussion, entitled In Tribute to Saba Mahmood, was dedicated to the recently deceased anthropologist from the University of California, Berkeley who dedicated her scientific research career to studying the relationship of different religious forms and sexual practices, in particular as regards women. At the conversation in Art-kino Croatia, guests from the region joined Judith Butler in evoking Saba Mahmood’s book Religious Difference in a Secular Age. A Minority Report, focusing specifically on aspects directly relevant to the regional context. Participating in the conversation: Rebeka Anic (Institute of Social Sciences Ivo Pilar – Split), Zilka Spahic Siljak (University of Stanford, TPO Foundation Sarajevo), Sanja Potkonjak (University of Zagreb), Adriana Zaharijevic (IFDT, University of Belgrade), Senka Bozic (University of Zadar), with moderation by Sanja Bojanic (CAS SEE, APURI). The discussion was held in Croatian and English. The round table was followed by the projection of Martha Rosler’s film Semiotics of the Kitchen (USA, 1975).

Organizers: University of Rijeka, Center for Advanced Studies Southeast Europe (UNIRI CAS SEE), Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory (University of Belgrade).

Partners: Friedrich Ebert Stiftung Zagreb, Croatian National Theatre Ivan pl. Zajc, Erste Stiftung, European Fund for the Balkans, Institut Francais Croatia, Consulato generale d’Italia – Fiume, Goethe Institute Zagreb, Art-kino Croatia and the City of Rijeka. The Summer School program was part of the “Kitchen” and “Seasons of Power” Flagships of the project “Rijeka 2020 – European Capital of Culture.”

Photo credits: Art-kino Croatia

III. Rijeka SeminaRi

Rijeka Summer Research Seminars in History & Culture

Dates: July 11-12, 2018

Organizers: CAS SEE & Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences in Rijeka event organized with CEASCRO (Rijeka) & the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity (Göttingen)

DAY 1  – History of Psychiatry and Mental Diseases
Wednesday, 11. 7. 2018,  at 3:30 pm

Venue: Faculty of Philosophy and Social Sciences in Rijeka, Sveučilišna Avenija 4, 51000 Rijeka – Department of Cultural Studies, 8th floor, Room 807.

CEASCRO Project event – Financed by HRZZ – Croatian Science Foundation:

Mental illnesses and Patient Files: Interdisciplinary approaches to historical research

Session 1:  Katarina Parhi (University of Oulu), Born to be deviant. Histories of the diagnosis of psychopathy in Finland  (a PhD research: Questions, problems, tools and methodologies of a research on mental illness)

First round of Discussion on the methodologies of historical and cultural research on patient files and medical diagnoses.

Session 2: The connection between mental diseases, society and psychiatry in the Eastern Adriatic (19th-20th centuries)

Vanni D’Alessio (University of Naples, CAS SEE, CEASCRO) and Filip Čeč (Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences in Rijeka, CEASCRO): A research on patient files from the Mental Asylum of Trieste and the problem of moral insanity and psychopathy).

Vinko Drača (University of Zagreb), Silent voices: Use of Patient Files in Historical Research of the Psyche.

Heike Karge (University of Regensburg, CEASCRO), Working with patient files from the Southern Habsburg / Croatian area. Challenges and perspectives.

Milan Radošević (Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts – Department of Pula), Public and mental health in 20th century Istria: Institutions and perspectives of historical research

Iva Milovan Delić (University of Pula) and Marlena Plavšic (University of Pula), Experiences on historical research on mental and other diseases in Pula at the end of World War.

Discussant: Luca Malatesti (University of Rijeka, CEASCRO)

Second round of discussion on the methodologies of historical and cultural research on patient files and medical diagnoses.

DAY 2 | Urban Memory of Empires / Anthropology of Food and Play
Date: Thursday, July 12, 2018,  at 10:00 am

Venue: Faculty of Philosophy and Social Sciences in Rijeka, Sveučilišna Avenija 4, 51000 Rijeka – Department of Cultural Studies, 8th floor, Room 807.

10:00 | SECTION 1 | Presentation and discussion of the Project: Empires of Memory: The Cultural Politics of Historicity in Former Habsburg and Ottoman Cities.

Participants: Jeremy Walton (Project Leader, Empires of Memory Research Group, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity, Göttingen); Gruia Badescu (Research Association, School of Geography, University of Oxford); Miloš Jovanović (Project Member, Empires of Memory Research Group, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity, Göttingen)

Discussants: Vjeran Pavlaković (Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences in Rijeka, University of Rijeka), Vanni D’Alessio (University of Naples, CAS SEE)

SECTION 2 | Ethnographies of work and play 

12.30 | Session 1: SHIPYARDS

Sanja Puljar D’Alessio (Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences in Rijeka):  Ethnography of Organization: The case of the Shipyard 3. May; Andy Hodges (Institute for East and Southeast European Studies, Regensburg): title tba.

14.30 | Session 2: FOOD

Barbara Turk Niksač (CAS SEE), Going Back to the Land in Slovenia: Growing Food as Lifestyle Politics; Sarah Czerny (Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences in Rijeka), Geographies of Milk; Marija Katalinić (Rijeka2020) Urban garden projects in Rijeka.

Discussant: Jernej Mlekuž (Znanstvenoraziskovalni center Slovenske akademije znanosti in umetnosti, Ljubljana)

End of Day 2: Thursday, July 12, 2018 at 6.00 pm

Venue: Empeduja Beach Bar, Bivio (Kantrida)

Keynote Dialogue on Food Ethnography with:

Jernej Mlekuž (SAZU, Ljubljana) author of I feel kranjska kobasica. Kako je kranjska kobasica podigla slovenski narod  (Zagreb, 2018), Burek: A Culinary Metaphor (Budapest, 2015), ABC  Migraciji (Ljubljana, 2011).

List of 2018 Participants:

Gruia Badescu (Research Association, School of Geography, University of Oxford, CAS SEE), Sarah Czerny (Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences in Rijeka), Neža Čebron Lipovec (Univerza na Primorskem, Koper Capodistria), Filip Čeč (Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences in Rijeka), Štefan Čok (History Section of the Slovenian Library, Trieste), Vanni D’Alessio (Università di Napoli, CAS SEE), Franko Dota (Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Zagreb), Vinko Drača (Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Zagreb), Andrew Hodges (Institute for East and Southeast European Studies, Regensburg), Katja Hrobat Virloget (Univerza na Primorskem, Koper),  Ivan Jeličić (Università di Trieste), Igor Jovanović (Univerza na Primorskem, Fakulteta za humanistične študije), Miloš Jovanović (Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity), Heike Karge (University of Regensburg, CEASCRO), Daša Ličen (Znanstvenoraziskovalni center Slovenske akademije znanosti in umetnosti, Ljubljana), Luca Malatesti (Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences in Rijeka), Iva Milovan Delić (University of Pula), Jernej Mlekuž (Znanstvenoraziskovalni center Slovenske akademije znanosti in umetnosti, Ljubljana), Lidija Nikočević (Ethnographic museum of Istria), Olga Orlić (Institute for Anthropology in Zagreb), Katariina Parhi (University of Oulu), Vjeran Pavlaković (Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences in Rijeka), Tea Perinčić (Maritime and History Museum of the Croatian Littoral Rijeka), Marlena Plavšic (University of Pula). Sanja Puljar D’Alessio (Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences in Rijeka) Milan Radošević (Zavod za povijesne i društvene znanosti HAZU, Područna jedinica Pula), Kaja Širok (Muzej novejše zgodovine Slovenije), Péter Techet (Leibniz-Institut für Europäische Geschichte, Mainz, Germany), Barbara Turk Nikšač (CAS SEE), Jeremy F. Walton (Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity).

On the books by the keynote speaker Jernej Mlekuž see:

I feel kranjska kobasica. Kako je kranjska kobasica podigla slovenski narod 

Burek: A Culinary Metaphor 

On the project CEASCROsee the following link.

On the project, Empire(s) in a flash: Locating Habsburg and Ottoman pasts visit this link.

 


 

“Critique of Violence Now. From Thinking to Acting Against Violence” with Judith Butler

The CAS SEE 2018 Summer School “Critique of Violence Now. From Thinking to Acting Against Violence” (June 18 – 22, 2018) opened with at inaugural lecture by Judith Butler, entitled “Interpreting Non-Violence”. The event took place at the Croatian National Theater “Ivan pl. Zajc” in Rijeka on Monday, June 18th 2018. During the lecture Butler posed a question: who is the “we” that gathered at this occasion? Whoever we were, she said, we are all different, and conflict, is surely already among us. The challenge is to live with the conflict without (any) violence.

Judith Butler, Maxine Elliot Professor at the University of California, Berkeley, reminded us how our society stems from a powerful foundational fiction that is based on a conception of the human as masculine, self-sufficient, adult individual. This fiction inaugurates a societal structure that sustains ideas of individualism. But, what would happen if we tried another story?

We are all born into a condition of radical interdependency. Judith Butler advocated for changing our focus on interdependency against the self-sufficiency fantasy that is deeply rooted in our societies. Coming to the realization of our mutual interdependency is the condition of equality that can lead towards the understanding of our global obligations (toward our fellow humans, other animals, other living processes, and the environment). Butler argued against the mechanisms that cause that some lives are more grievable than others and some lives are more precarious than others. This is why an ethics of non-violence has to do with an equal distribution of the conditions of livability. In her final words, she concluded that arguing for non-violence is usually regarded as unrealistic, but maybe those who claim this are too enamored with reality.

On Tuesday 19th 2018, the City of Rijeka Town Hall hosted the public debate “Political Violence: is counterstrike possible?”, moderated by Manuela Bojadžijev (Humboldt University). In this debate, Donatella della Porta (Scuola Normale Superiore, Firenze) argued for the need of analyzing violence at different levels: macro (economic injustice and ethnic discrimination), meso (incapsulation of ideology), and micro (through acts of intolerant identities). Peter Fenves (Northwestern University) used Immanuel Kant’s fantasy of perpetual peace to argue that we do not have a fantasy of the state that can lead towards a theory of right. Do we, then, need new fantasies? Also, he presented Walter Benjamin’s idea of the connection between the state and criminality: criminality is an alibi to the State foundation – all States are organized violent organizations, and violent syndicates have pretensions of taking over the State.

Marc Crepon (Ecole Normale Superiore, Paris) added that there is a murderous consent as a dimension to our belonging to this world. Ignorance is also a part of murderous consent to violence and we need legal action of lawmakers to withhold certain forms of violence. Child labour, slavery, political violence, death penalty, domestic violence/masculine domination, are examples of violences that have to be tackled through legal actions. The media theorist Astrid Deuber-Mankowsky (Ruhr University Bochum) used the example of the Counter-Strike videogame to reflect on the politics of the game against terrorism.

Judith Butler reflected on the title of the debate: Is counterstrike possible? What is a strike? Is it violent or non-violent, or is it perhaps both? Is a non-violent counter-strike possible? We often think about violence as a physical blow, but is it the case for political violence? Political violence seems to act at the level of the state (police, army, prisons), of the violent laws (permitting genocide or femicide), of institutions (abandoning the migrants, for example). States also fail at taking political stances against these violences. And this, she argued, is not a physical blow, but it is violence. This passive way of failing to provide sanctuary fosters particular ways of circulating violence. In her final words, Manuela Bojadzijev claimed that nowadays it is more than ever necessary that institutions take an affirmative stance by pronouncing themselves as sanctuaries for migrants and for marginalized people. This positive act of taking positions in favor of human rights can maybe become the affirmative counterstrike that helps us face contemporary violences.

On Wednesday afternoon, June 21th, the Summer School rendered a tribute to Saba Mahmood, Professor of Anthropology at the University of California at Berkeley who passed away on March 10th, 2018. This tribute took form of a round table, moderated by Sanja Bojanić (UNIRI CAS SEE/Academy for Applied Arts), with participation by Judith Butler, Rebeka Anić (Institute of Social Sciences Ivo Pilar – Center Split), Zilka Spahić Šiljak (Standford University/TPO Foundation Sarajevo), Sanja Pontonjak, (University of Zagreb), Adriana Zaharijević (IFDT University of Belgrade), and Senka Božić (University of Zadar). Together, they reflected on Mahmood’s important contribution to contemporary debates on secularism, feminism, ethics and politics, with viewpoints that contested Western ideas on pious Muslim women.

For Saba Mahmood, secularism can be an instrument for intolerance and leads towards conflict because of its own ambiguity: it advocates equality while imposing inequalities and producing minorities. In this sense, the participants of the table deliberated on the features of a state that considers itself as secular, specifically reflecting on the Croatian context.

Regarding feminism, there was an interesting reflection on the relationship between secular and religious feminisms. It was stated that an entirely secular (or religious) feminism would be provincial; thus, it would be wise to overcome the secularism/religion divide in order to escape the reactive cycle that is often established and to work towards a cooperation between secular and religious feminisms.

Summer school organizers: University of Rijeka, Center for Advanced Studies Southeast Europe (UNIRI CAS SEE), Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory (University of Belgrade).

Partners: Friedrich Ebert Stiftung Zagreb, HNK Ivan pl. Zajc, Erste Stiftung, European Fund for the Balkans, Institut Francais Croatia, Consulato generale d’Italia – Fiume, Goethe Institute Zagreb, Art-kino Croatia and the City of Rijeka.

The 2018 Summer School program is part of the “Kitchen” and “Seasons of Power” Flagships of the project “Rijeka 2020 – European Capital of Culture.”

"Non-violent resistance works." A Talk Europe! interview with Judith Butler

Talk Europe!Is non-violent resistance able to end aggression and wars? And are there times when violence is, in fact, necessary? Judith Butler believes that non-violent resistance can be a strong and forceful instrument to undermine sources of state power and bring about change.Special thanks goes to the Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe for making this interview possible. #cassee #uniri

Objavljuje ERSTE Foundation u Srijeda, 29. kolovoza 2018.

The “Non-violent resistance works.” A Talk Europe! interview with Prof. Judith Butler, brought to us by ERSTE Foundation at the UNIRI CAS SEE in June 2018.

Fashion Week Spring 2018 – Food: Policies & Innovations

Fashion Week Spring 2018 – Food: Policies & Innovations gathered, for the first time in Croatia, the representatives of the European parliament, Croatian government, the civil sector, scientific community, media, architecture and activism in a two-day discussion on the growing economic, ecological, social and urban problem of Europe – food waste, donation and production. Organizers of the conference are European Capital of Culture Rijeka 2020, Center for Culture of Dialogue (CeKaDe), Food Network and CAS SEE.

The problem of rising food waste and insufficient food donations entered the Croatian media space with the removal of VAT on food donations in 2015. However, the change in the state of affairs has not been substantial enough.

Among the numerous conclusions of this spring’s Fashion Week are also the following:

  • It is necessary to establish a cooperation between civil society organizations and state entities for the purposes of dismantling legislative, logistical and administrative problems with regards to food donating
  • It is necessary to push for long-term education of donors and communication among intermediaries with regards to food donation and food waste, but also for possibilities of upgrading their operations
  • It is necessary to reduce food waste at every phase in the food distribution chain
  • It is necessary to educate citizens on the imprecision of “best before” signs on food and push for governmental responsibility to offer recommendations as to how long after the “best before” date can the food be regarded as available for consumption
  • It is advisable to create bold plans for urban food production in order to allow for the production of sufficient amount of quality food for the needs of the citizens (and Rijeka’s abandoned port areas offer a compelling site for reinvention for such purposes)

The fourth ICCTP Conference “The Critique of Violence Now”

We are pleased to announce the fourth conference of the International Consortium of Critical Theory Programs (ICCTP) to be held at Rijeka, Croatia on June 16-19, 2018 on the topic of “The Critique of Violence Now”. The conference will take place at the Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe, University of Rijeka, and will be sponsored in conjunction with the Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade, Serbia.

The Consortium is jointly housed at the University of California, Berkeley and Northwestern University with support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The task of the Consortium is to establish an active network of programs, projects, centers and institutes that will expand the global reach and form of critical theory for our time. The Consortium seeks to document, connect, and further the new and varied forms that critical theory has assumed in light of contemporary global challenges, including economic and political challenges to the university as an institution charged with the task of safeguarding and promoting critical thought.

The Consortium is meant to open new institutional links, overcome forms of hemispheric disconnection, and to pursue collaborative forms of interdisciplinary knowledge, guided by questions such as these: What are the current historical and global conditions in which the value of critical thought is challenged? How do we best describe and evaluate the prevailing forms of global power in their regional specificity that shape and constrain our intellectual life as it crosses academic and popular spheres, and how can critical thought rise to the challenge of these new global challenges through effective and thoughtful political engagement? By now, three conferences have been held, in Bologna, São Paulo and Johannesburg, on the topics of the critical tasks of university, the ends of democracy and reflections on memory and political time.

The issue of violence will be the focus of the fourth ICCTP conference, framed by the question, “what is a critique of violence for the present?” Can we have develop a global notion of “critique” without a “critique of violence”? Walter Benjamin asked this question in the early 1920s and he offered his own account of legal violence. Many of the traditional debates about violence and non-violence presumed a common understanding of both terms: we were assumed to know how best to identify violence and how to go about justifying or opposing its use. What challenge does the idea of “legal violence” pose to those traditional debates? And what forms does “legal violence” take now? What is the relation between spectacles of massacre, for instance, and those forms of legal violence, including administrative violence: how are they related, and how are they identified?  Does it matter how we understand regional violence (and how we designate regions) when we seek to answer this question? In addressing the topic “the critique of violence now,” we will be focusing in this meeting on the question of how we might re-appropriate Walter Benjamin’s influential and controversial essay “Critique of Violence” (Zur Kritik der Gewalt) in the context of our present political terrain.

The participants of the fourth conference of the ICCTP, The Critique of Violence Now, are: Petar Bojanić (IFDT/CAS), Judith Butler (UC Berkeley), Marc Crépon (ENS), Astrid Deuber-Mankowsky (Ruhr-Universität Bochum), Başak Ertür (Birkbeck College London), Peter Fenves (Northwestern University), Anne-Lise François (UC Berkeley), Dario Gentili (Roma Tre), Julia Ng (Goldsmiths), Pablo Oyarzún (Universidad de Chile), Massimo Palma (Suor Orsola Napoli), Michelle Ty (Clemson University).

The ICCTP conference will take place in tandem with the Summer School Critique of Violence Now: From Thinking to Acting against Violence (June 18-22).

Conveners

Judith Butler
Principal Investigator, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Grant for an International Consortium of Critical Theory Programs
University of California, Berkeley

Petar Bojanić
Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade
Center for Advanced Studies Southeast Europe, University of Rijeka

Sanja Milutinović Bojanić
Academy of Applied Arts
Center for Advanced Studies Southeast Europe, University of Rijeka

Gazela Pudar Draško
Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade

Adriana Zaharijević
Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade

THE CRITIQUE OF VIOLENCE NOW
June 16-19, 2018

June 16th

5-7 PM

Planning meeting, discussion of existing and future projects.

(Judith Butler, Petar Bojanić)

June 17th

9.30 AM-12.30 PM

Opening paragraph on law and justice, focusing on the means/ends distinction, explicating the meaning of critique for this essay (Peter Fenves)

Paragraphs 2-3: The problem of natural law (Massimo Palma)

Paragraphs 4-6:  “The question of the justification of certain means that constitute violence”: the distinction between legitimate and illegitimate violence; the introduction of legal violence as a problem; violence of the law and violence outside the law (Julia Ng)

2-5 PM

Paragraphs 7-8: Introduction of class struggle and the general strike, its relation to “pure means” and to non-violence; its relation to military law; the introduction to law-making in relation to Sorel’s Reflections on Violence (Marc Crépon)

Paragraphs 9-11: The police, its ghostly presence; transition to the non-contractual character of non-violent resolution, its relation to language and understanding; the relation between parliamentary power and violence; the non-violence as “unalloyed means” or “pure means” (Dario GentiliBaşak Ertür)

June 18th

9.30 AM-12.30 PM

Paragraphs 12-13: Non-violent resolution of conflict; techniques of civil agreement; the prohibition of fraud, “a policy of pure means,” the general strike (Anne-Lise François)

Paragraphs 14-17: Violence imposed by fate, the nonmediate function of violence, transition to mythic violence and the unwritten law and its relation to retribution; fate and the introduction of the mythical; the distinction between mythical and divine violence, the examples of Niobe and Korah (Astrid Deuber-Mankowsky, Michelle Ty)

2-5 PM

Paragraph 18: Divine power and “educative power”; Judaism and the commandment against killing; the doctrine of self-defense; the condition of “man”; the question of sacred life (Judith Butler, Petar Bojanić)

Paragraph 19: The formulation of the critique of violence as the philosophy of its history; breaking the cycle of the dialectical rising and falling of law-making and law-preserving violence. How to name that break, that “attack on law”? The expiatory power of violence; its invisibility; the final speculations on “true war” and “divine violence” (Pablo Oyarzún)

June 19th

10.00 AM -12.00 PM

Informal discussion of ICCTP and future plans for collaboration.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Information on the Participants

 

Petar Bojanić is the director of the Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory (IFDT) at the University of Belgrade, where he has been a fellow since 2005. He directs the Center for Advanced Studies – South East Europe (CAS) at the University of Rijeka.

 

Judith Butler is Maxine Elliot Professor in the Department of Comparative Literature and the Program in Critical Theory at the University of California, Berkeley. She served as Founding Director of the Program in Critical Theory. She is the Co-Director of the International Consortium of Critical Theory Programs.

 

Marc Crépon is Professor of Philosophy at the École Normale Supérieure, Paris, and the Chair of the Philosophy Department. He is also Research Director at the National Scientific Research Center CNRS, (Husserl Archives).

 

Astrid Deuber-Mankowsky is Professor of Media and Gender Studies at the Ruhr-University in Bochum. She is an external affiliate of the Centre for Philosophy and Critical Thought at Goldsmiths, University of London.

 

Başak Ertür is Lecturer in Law and Co-Director of the Centre for Law and the Humanities at the School of Law at Birkbeck, University of London.

 

Peter Fenves is Professor of Literature, German and Comparative Literature at Northwestern University. He has taught at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Johns Hopkins, Princeton and Harvard Universities.

 

Anne-Lise François is Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of California, Berkeley.

 

Dario Gentili is Associate Professor of Moral Philosophy in the Department of Philosophy, Communication and Performing Arts at the University of Roma Tre.

Gentili is a board member of the Associazione Italiana Walter Benjamin (AWB).

 

Julia Ng is Co-Director of the Centre for Philosophy and Critical Thought. She co-chairs the Walter Benjamin London Research Network. She is also Research Associate of the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures at Harvard University.

 

Pablo Oyarzún is Professor of Philosophy and Aesthetics and Director of the Bicentennial Initiative at the University of Chile. He is also director of the Central Research Seminar at the Art Institute of the Catholic University of Valparaíso. Oyarzún has also been a member of the Superior Council of the National Fund of Science and Technology (FONDECYT).

 

Massimo Palma is Assistant Researcher of Philosophy at the Suor Orsola Benincasa University in Naples, Italy.

 

Michelle Ty is Assistant Professor in the Department of English at Clemson University and a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute for Cultural Inquiry in Berlin. She is currently writing a book about Walter Benjamin’s solidarity with all that is abjected from the category of the human.