Monthly Archives: April 2018

CAS SEE Fellows at the „Engagement for Social Change: Moving beyond Resistance“ conference

The current, 7th generation of CAS SEE fellows participated in the „Engagement for Social Change: Moving beyond Resistance“ conference held in Belgrade, 19-21 April, 2018.

Francesca Forle presented her paper Rythmòs in Acting Together. A Tool to Improve Stability and Orient Power Hierarchies“ at the “Thinking of Engagement” panel of the first day, together with Olga Nikolić, Igor Cvejić, Sotiria Ismini Gounari and Jelena Vasiljević at the University of Belgrade Rectorate.

During the second day of the conference, current Fellow Polona Sitar presented her paper „Menstrual Movements and Feminist Spirituality: The Red Tent Case Study“ at the “Yes, We Can(‘t): Women’s Engagement” panel with Anna Bednarczyk, Kathleen Zeidler and CAS SEE non-resident Fellow, Monica Cano Abadía presenting her paper on „Risking Vulnerability in Feminist Activism: The #metoo Case“.

The workshop on the book „Where did revolution go?“ by/with Donatella della Porta chaired by Gazela Pudar Draško (Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory) also hosted current Fellows Barbara Turk Niskac, Tiziano Toracca and Filip Milacic, together with researchers from the Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory; Jelena Vasiljević, Srđan Prodanović, Marjan Ivković and Irena Fiket.

 

Critique of Violence Now: From Thinking to Acting against Violence

2018 CAS SEE Summer School
Rijeka, June 18 – 22, 2018

Guest lecturers:

Judith Butler (Berkeley University)

Hervé Le Brass (Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, Paris)

Peter Fenves (Northwestern University)

Alexis Nuselovici-Nouss (University of Aix-Marseille, Fondation Maison des sciences de l’homme)

Astrid Deuber-Mankowsky (Ruhr University Bochum)

Marc Crepon (Ecole normale supérieure, Paris)

 

Rationale and background:

The 2018 CAS SEE Summer School examines one of today’s most pressing topics: how to think and what to do with violence in our present society. To what extent is it possible to deconstruct and name emerging mechanisms of violence? What are the kinds of phenomena that escalate coercion and violence, making it difficult to either contain them or to work out feasible alternatives? Assuming that violence in the various social contexts is not a self-contained, but rather a relational/social phenomenon (across various social entities and institutions such as families, associations, corporations, nations, states, religions), is there any social purpose of violence, and is there any productive alternative to violence? Is violence a form of communication, and are there substitutes in terms of strategies of communication that might non-repressively reduce the recourse to violence?

Southeastern Europe has seen more than its share of violence, as well as of anti-violence ideology over the past several decades, propagated both by the states and governments and by civil society organizations and various sections of the society. The region has seen the adoption and implementation of various EU laws and policies to a far greater and more extreme level than they were implemented in their countries of origin. The trend is partly a symptom of identity crisis and identity insecurity, where policies are designed to curtail all kinds of violence in society, shifting power towards every increasing prerogatives of the administration. Every instance of violence tends to be interpreted as a systematic social degeneration, which needs to be uprooted by draconian control and repressive policies. The results include an extremely powerful police force and state institutions with sweeping authority over individual citizens, and an increasing apathy and defensiveness by the ordinary people. Thus the study of violence as well as anti-violence policy addresses a core issue for the quality of life in Southeastern Europe.

“Critique of Violence Now” will:

  • Provide a framework for exchange of views and insights among activists and academics on following topics: Political Violence, Administrative Violence, Legal Violence, Domestic Violence, Collective Violence in the regional and global context, Countering (discourses of) violence through social engagement, Social inequalities and neoliberal conquest of state and society;
  • Inspire and build capacity of participants through stimulating topical and theoretical input by renowned academics, creating opportunities for building networks and joint cooperation actions in the field;
  • Provide workspaces for the participants to discuss and work on short papers (app. 3 pages) dedicated to four major clusters: “Political Violence: Revisited”; “Administrative Violence: Migration”; “Ethnicized and Racialised Violence”; “Deconstructing Misogyny and Patriarchy”. Papers (in English) would be further refined immediately after the Summer School and published in a volume edited by the Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory University of Belgrade.

Technical information and application procedure:

The official language of the Summer School is English.

The Program Committee of the 2018 CAS SEE Summer School will select the presenters based on the submitted abstracts responding to four Clusters:

  • “Political Violence: Revisited”;
  • “Administrative Violence: Migration”;
  • “Ethnicized and Racialized Violence”;
  • “Deconstructing Misogyny and Patriarchy”

We kindly ask you to put the following title in your email subject: ‘Name: title of the paper’. The complete application should be submitted in.doc or .docx format, and must contain: the title of the presentation, an abstract of up to 200 words, key words and a short biography in English.

Summer School applications should be sent only via e-mail to the following address: cas@cas.uniri.hr

Deadline for abstracts is 31st March 2018.

It is expected that the participants submit their full papers before 1st June 2018.

2018 CAS SEE Summer School Full Registration Fee is 125 Euros; Student Registration Fee is 50 Euros.

Payment is due before 1st June 2018.

The Summer School hosts offer reception and the ticket entrance for the theatre performance on June 18th in the evening, and provide refreshments throughout the duration of the Summer School program.

Important dates:

Application deadline: 31st March 2018

Notification of acceptance: 30th April 2018

2018 CAS SEE Summer School dates: 18th–22nd June 2018

Program Committee:

Astrid Deuber-Mankowsky; Ruhr University Bochum

Petar Bojanic; IFDT University of Belgrade / CAS SEE University of Rijeka

Vedran Dzihic; oiip / CAS SEE University of Rijeka

Manuela Bojadzijev; Humboldt University

Sanja Bojanic; CAS SEE/CWS, University of Rijeka

Adriana Zaharijevic; IFDT, University of Belgrade

Gazela Pudar Drasko; IFDT, University of Belgrade

Organization Board:

Mónica Cano Abadía, Kristina Smoljanovic (CAS SEE University of Rijeka)

For information on the time schedule, organization and future events, please follow us at the official website and the Facebook page.

If any further details are needed, please contact us at: cas@cas.uniri.hr

“Peace and Conflicts – Present and Future Challenges” Conference

The conference Peace and Conflicts – Present and Future Challenges (April 16 – 17, 2018)  is set to be held at the University in Rijeka (Campus) within the organizational framework of the University of Rijeka, Peace Research Institute, Oslo; International Center for Ethics in the Sciences and Humanities, University of Tübingen; Center for Peace Studies, Zagreb; and CeKaDe, Rijeka; along with conference partners Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung, Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe, City of Rijeka, Primorje-Gorski Kotar County and Rijeka 2020.


The conference will focus on the state of “frozen conflicts”, along with contributions on the nature of political violence, political reconciliation, disagreement resolution etc. Likewise, the conference will explore yet another cause of internal conflicts within our societies – i.e. migrations and the “Balkan Route”. Contributors to this conference include a wide range of eminent experts and activists from Croatia and abroad.


 For full program information please click to enlarge:

 

Conference Venue: Akvarij – University of Rijeka Campus

Address: Radmile Matejčić 5, HR-51000 Rijeka

 


Call for applications: “Notation, Algorithm, Criticism: Towards a Critical Epistemology of Architecture”

Venue and date: IUC, Dubrovnik, September 17-22, 2018

Applications deadline: August 15, 2018

Course description:

In modernity, there is no place for architecture without critical reflection, just as modern culture without cultural criticism is no better than the barbarism it has replaced (Schnädelbach). Critique is necessary of any activity, be it artistic, political, or scientific. In 1976, it was the „crisis of utopia” that laid the foundation for the late Manfredo Tafuri’s “ideological criticism”. By contrast, the philosopher and politician Massimo Cacciari maintained that crisis “must be produced”, thus proclaiming that any intellectual position that does not posit itself as productive in regard to crisis is reactionary.

Admittedly, we look back today with a certain nostalgia on a critical theory of architecture as it emerged in the 1960s — the heyday of critical thought in sociology and philosophy. Architects such as Peter Eisenman, Frank Gehry, and Bernhard Tschumi along with philosophers such as Theodor Adorno, Jacques Derrida, Gianni Vattimo, and Fredric Jameson were among the pioneers of critical discourse in architecture. Each had their own specific critical agenda, with some of them more inclined toward subversive methods that aimed at undermining architecture as the last stronghold of metaphysics. In architecture, critical theory always coincides with critical practice.

Since then, criticism has been absorbed and utilized by the very same institutions that it had helped to create. It can hardly be overlooked that in digital consumer societies, criticism has become a powerful economic agent. “The task of criticism has, in fact, changed,” Tafuri wrote in the introduction to his seminal book Theories and History of Architecture, published in 1976. But even more has changed with the advent of digital media technology. In unprecedented ways, today’s media technologies interfere with the practice of knowledge and change them according to their own – digital – agenda. Cacciari’s plea for crisis as a driving force for the production of knowledge has turned into a common cultural practice.

The seminar will address the concept of critique in architecture from a historic as well as contemporary perspective. It will investigate core concepts such as critique and practice, authorship and agency, history and documentation, concept and diagram, as well as idea and project. What are the possibilities of critical practice today in the age of digital transparency? What are the cultural, aesthetic, and social implications of the current transition from 2-D design processes to 3-D modeling (BIM)? Is this shift to digital media technology of equal importance as Alberti’s 15th century shift to notation? The transfer of ideas into drawings onto paper first opened up architecture to the creative and intellectual play of representation, and allowed for references to architectural history and its philosophical ideas. Architectural practice turned into a critical practice when it separated thinking about architecture from building architecture. The potential of graphic notation transformed architecture into a modern, ambivalent, contradictory, and critical cultural practice equal to literature and philosophy. At times, it seems as if media technology hollows out architecture’s critical consciousness and returns it to a simple practice of mere physical and material presence.

Course Directors:

Prof. Snjezana Prijic-Samarzija (University of Rijeka)

Prof. Joerg Gleiter (Technical University of Berlin)

Prof. Petar Bojanic (University of Belgrade/University of Rijeka)

Prof. Giovanni Durbiano (Politecnico di Torino)

Prof. Alessandro Armando (Politecnico di Torino)

 Lecturers:

Prof. Snjezana Prijic-Samarzija (University of Rijeka)

Prof. Joerg Gleiter (Technical University of Berlin)

Prof. Petar Bojanic (University of Belgrade/University of Rijeka)

Prof. Sanja Bojanic (University of Rijeka)

Prof. Alessandro Armando (Politecnico di Torino)

Dr. Lidia Gasperoni (Technical University of Berlin) (TBC)

Prof. Renata Stih/Dr. Frieder Schnock (Beuth Univiersity of Applied Arts, Berlin) (TBC)

Dr. Christoph Engemann (Bauhaus-Universität Weimar) (TBC)

Course instruction for students / participants:

NOTE: Participants should prepare 20-minute-long presentations on topics of their research and allow a further 10 minutes for discussions following course descriptions. The titles of the presentations with short abstracts need to be sent following this link.

* ECTS points are available for MA and PhD students. The requirements for ECTS credits are (i) participation in at least 80% of all lectures, (ii) presentation of a previously prepared original paper on the topic of the course or discussion papers on the papers provided by lecturers. The organizers will prepare the official IUC certificate, which will include a detailed overview of the students’ obligations (sufficient for 3 ECTS). Whether ECTS will be recognized as parts of their academic programs or as additional achievements in diploma supplements depends solely on the institutions that the students come from.

Accommodation:

Students themselves organize their travel and accommodation in Dubrovnik. The IUC administration has recommended the services of the Gulliver travel agency, which can be contacted via the e-mail address danijela.strman@gulliver.hr. You can also acquire additional information about the accommodation on this IUC link: http://www.iuc.hr/accomodation.php

Course Fee:

The IUC requires the payment of a small course fee, currently 40 EUR or its HRK equivalent, which is to be paid by all course participants. The fee could be paid to the following account or directly in the IUC office throughout the duration of the course.

Udruga Interuniverzitetski Centar Dubrovnik, Don Frana Bulića 4, 20000 Dubrovnik

IBAN: HR2923300031100213145

BANK: Societe genrale – Splitska banka d.d.