Monthly Archives: May 2017

SOCIAL ONTOLOGY SYMPOSIUM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF RIJEKA

The 19th edition of the International Conference Contemporary philosophical issues: Social Ontology Symposium at the University of Rijeka was officially opened with a welcome address by the newly elected University of Rijeka Chancellor, professor Snježana Prijić-Samaržija, followed by opening remarks by the CAS-SEE and Institute for Social Theory (University of Belgrade) director, professor Petar Bojanić.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Following opening words, professor emeritus John Searle (Department of Philosophy, University of California, Berkeley) took the chance to render a remarkable perspective on how status functions are manufactured in the complex structure of human society, chaired by professor Nenad Miščević, and followed with a likely unique lecture by Maurizio Ferraris (LabOnt, University of Torino) entitled The Color of Money, moderated by Sanja Bojanic, director of CAS-SEE.

The two-day symposium (May 22-23, 2017) resumed with presentations and debates with: Maurizio Ferraris, Jennifer Hudin, Tomoyuki Yamada, Abigail Klassen, Paolo de Lucia, Bojan Borstner, Michael Vlerick, Lorenzo Passerini Glazel, Boran Berčić, Giuseppe Lorini, Edoardo Fregonese, Zvonimir Šikić, Nenad Smokrović, Matija Lukač, Marko Luka Zubčić, Leonard Pektor, Denis Paušić, David Grčki, Iva Bubalo, Alice Borghi, Miljana Milojević, Guglielmo Feis, Aleksandar Šušnjar, Kristina Lekić, Benedikt Perak, Olga Markač, Nenad and Danilo Šuster.

The event was organized by Department of Philosophy, Faculty for Humanities and Social Sciences, Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe, University of Rijeka; Croatian Society for Analytic Philosophy, PhD programme “Contemporaneity and philosophy”, LabOnt, University of Torino and Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade.

SOCIAL ONTOLOGY SYMPOSIUM

19th Edition of the International Conference 

Contemporary Philosophical Issues

Date: May 22-23, 2017

Conference Venue: Faculty for Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Rijeka, Campus, Sveučilišna avenija 4, 51000 Rijeka

Organizer: Department of Philosophy, Faculty for Humanities and Social Sciences; Center for Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe, University of Rijeka; Croatian Society for Analytic Philosophy, PhD programme “Contemporaneity and Philosophy”; LabOnt, University of Torino; Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory, University of Belgrade

Monday, May 22nd 2017
Plenary session (Room: 006)
09.00 –  09:30 Registration
09:30 – 10:00 Opening of the conference:

Snježana Prijić- Samaržija, chancellor of the University of Rijeka

Petar Bojanić, Director of the Center of  Advanced Studies – Southeast Europe, IFDT Belgrade University

Chairperson: Nenad Miščević
10:00 –11:00 John Searle

The Structure of Human Society

Chairperson: Sanja Bojanić
11:10 – 12:40 John Searle and Maurizio Ferraris

The Color of Money

13:00 – 14:30 Lunch break

 

Monday, May 22nd 2017
  TOPICS FROM JOHN SEARLE

Session A (room 401)

TOPICS FROM JOHN SEARLE

Session B (room 402)

Chairperson: Iris Vidmar Chairperson: Filip Čeč
14:30 – 15:15 Jennifer Hudin

Can Status Functions Be Discovered?

 

Tomoyuki Yamada

Formalizing Status Functions of Illocutionary Acts

15:20 – 16:05 Nenad Miščević

Searle’s Early Work: Ordinary Language Philosophy, or Linguistic Pragmatics?

Abigail Klassen

On the Multitude of Kinds of Social Kinds: Problematizing John R. Searle’s Institutional and Non-institutional Social Kinds

16:05 – 16:20 Coffee break Coffee break
Chairperson: Ana Gavran Miloš Chairperson: Andrea Mešanović
16:20 – 17:05 Paolo de Lucia

Dynamics of Normative Impossibility

 

Bojan Borstner

Metaphysics of Sociality

17:10 – 17:55 Michael Vlerick

Explaining Religion: Introducing an Institutional Approach

Lorenzo Passerini Glazel

Impossible Tokens, Necessary Types

 

17:55 – 18:10 Coffee break Coffee break
Chairperson: Miljana Milojević Chairperson: Ivan Cerovac
18:10 – 18:55 Giuseppe Lorini

Constitutive Rules and Meta-institutional Concepts

Boran Berčić

Are Nations Social Constructs?

19:00 – 19:45 Zvonimir Šikić

Why do Laws Succeed or do not Succeed?

Edoardo Fregonese

Imposing Function through Document. The Case of an Urban Plan: Plano Tomorrow in Plano (TX)

    20:30 Conference dinner

 

Tuesday, May 23rd 2017
STUDENT WORKSHOPS WITH JOHN SEARLE AND JENNIFER HUDIN

Social ontology meets collective epistemology

Room 006

09:00 –  10:30 Opening remarks: Nenad Smokrović, director of the PhD programme Philosophy and Contemporaneity

John Searle, Jennifer Hudin

Moderator: Snježana Prijić-Samaržija

Matija Lukač: Joint Commitment and Collective  Intentionality – Starting Point and Quality  Criterion

Marko Luka Zubčić: Social Ontology, Social Epistemology and Inferential Individualism

Leonard Pektor: Stoic Epistemic Virtues of Groups – Can there be an Unproblematic Direct Transfer from Individuals to Groups?

Denis Paušić: Is Wide Science a Group that Knows?

10:20 – 10:30 Coffee break
10:30 – 11:05 Moderator: Nenad Smokrović

David Grčki: How Bad is the “Bad Argument”

Aleksandar Šušnjar: Some Reflections on Searle’s View on the Connection between Language and Institution

Kristina Lekić: Group-mind and autism: Can we Talk about the Cognition of the Group of Autistic Persons?

 

 

Tuesday, May 23rd 2017
  TOPICS FROM JOHN SEARLE

Session A (room 401)

VARIA

Session B (room 402)

Chairperson: Iris Vidmar Chairperson:  Neven Petrović
11:10 – 11:55 Guglielmo Feis

Some (Alternative?) Facts for Searlean Social Ontology

Miljana Milojevic

Extended Mind and Personal Identity

12:00 – 12:45 Alice Borghi

Groups and Populism: a Case Study on Searlean Deontic Powers

Iva Bubalo

Semantics in Computational Cognition?

12:50 – 14:00 Lunch break

 

Tuesday, May 23rd 2017
  TOPICS FROM JOHN SEARLE

Session A (room 401)

VARIA

Session B (room 402)

Chairperson:  Nebojša Zelič Chairperson: Boran Berčić
14:15 – 15:00 Imke Maessen

Ordinary Citizens as the Source of Legal Validity

Danilo Šuster

On the Limits of Argumentation

 

15:05 – 15:50 Maria Matuszkiewicz

An Argument for a Minimal Mental Internalism

Nenad Smokrović

A Real Nature of Argumentation: Individual or Social?

15:50 – 16:00 Coffee break Coffee break
Chairperson: Ivan Cerovac Chairperson: Boran Berčić
16:00 – 16:45 Matjaž Potrč

Objectivity of the Brain in a Vat

Olga Markač

Analogical Reasoning

 

16:50 – 17:35 Benedikt Perak

Emergence of the Social Reality in the Ontological Model of Lexical Concepts and Constructions

 

 

MAREK SZILVASI

Does it matter for excluded Roma whether water is public or private? Case study of Slovenia

“Access to water especially in geographic regions threatened by water scarcity, have been increasingly elevated to the centre of the attention of governments, international community, and businesses across the world. Many political leaders and CEOs of multinational corporations have integrated water in their agenda and stated that water has become a new (blue) gold, and it should now to be treated like oil.
The predictions of irreversible water scarcity and consequential global corporate grab due to its increasing value might sound to most of us in Europe as a problem of the third world, or a scene from a science fiction movie or distant future at best. We take clean drinking water for granted. It is abundant and affordable, provided directly in our homes, and checked continuously to ensure it meets quality and safety standards.
Yet, not only that most of the water corporations and their advocacy groups have headquarters in Europe, all across Europe there are people living without access to improved water resources and sanitation. According to the United Nations Economic Committee for Europe (UNECE) and World Health Organisation (WHO), 12 per cent of population, some 110 million people, in the pan-European region is still without access to safe drinking water, and many of them are Roma.
In November 2016, in response to a citizens’ campaign, Slovenia became the first EU country to add the right to water to its Constitution, but the implementation of the new constitutional right has yet to be observed, especially in Romani communities.
After decades of petitioning local authorities to provide their households with drinking water and functioning sanitation, in March 2014, 16 Roma from two Roma neighbourhoods in Slovenia filed a complaint to the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR). The Hudorovič, Novak and Others v. Slovenia cases became the first right to water case at the ECtHR.
By analysing the case study of Slovenia, the first EU country, which recognised the right to water in its Constitution (2016) while also the first country sued at the European Court of Human Rights for failing to secure access to water to their citizens of Roma origin (2014), this presentation will point out the complex discourse of contemporary water movements and the very specific position of Roma living in social exclusion and housing informality. I will argue that despite the progressive legal framework and social movements claiming the right to water, the concerns of Roma are often neglected not only by the private and public water suppliers, but also by water activists. Due to the prevailing situation of anti-Roma discrimination and social exclusion, Roma have to make parallel claims on the access to water.”


Marek Szilvasi an independent scholar-activist. He received his PhD in Sociology from the University of Aberdeen, the United Kingdom, MA in Sociology and Philosophy from the Palacký University Olomouc, Czech Republic, and MA in the European Studies (Europe in the Wider World) from the University of Groningen, Netherlands. His PhD research has been sponsored by the interdisciplinary Centre for Citizenship, Civil Society, and Rule of Law (CISRUL).
His primary research interests lie in the fields of sociology of (human) rights, political philosophy, socio-legal and post-colonial theories, citizenship, social inclusion and equality paradigms, and environmental justice, all these with a particular focus on the situation of Roma in European societies.
Marek teaches at the Institute of Politics and International Studies of the ELTE University in Budapest, Hungary, and works as Head of research and human rights education of the European Roma Rights Centre (ERRC). He is also a board member of the PAD Foundation advocating environmental justice in CEE. He has been awarded the Martin Alexandersson Research Scholarship of the Raoul Wallenberg Institute for 2017.

 

 

 

 

MATEJA KURIR

Architecture as Ideology: the perspectives of critical theory (Benjamin and Adorno). An attempt

“The ideological attunement of architecture will be the key focus of the lecture, where the work of two promi-nent philosophers of critical theory on the topic of architecture, namely Walter Benjamin and Theodor W. Adorno, will be outlined. (more…)